Please,; Don't put a label on me!

Thailand
February 10, 2007 2:14am CST
I am not a Christian or a Jew. I am not a Muslim or a Hindu or a Buddhist. I am not an Atheist or an Agnostic. I do believe in the basic goodness of humankind and in a collective conciousness that unites us all. I am none of the above and I am all of the above. There is good in all religions and the evil only surfaces when we try to impose our own beliefs on someone else. If there is one thing I wish the world would embrace it is the non-violence and tolerance taught by Gandhi. If we all approached the world with an open and forgiving mind, what a better world this would be.
3 people like this
7 responses
@olaff123 (434)
• Namibia
10 Feb 07
Amen!
2 people like this
@dickkell (403)
• United States
10 Feb 07
The good in all religions is a surface interpretation. You cannot embrace Judaism and Christianity and Islam because they differ on the answers to the most basic questions. Refusing to commit to a belief system doesn't put you on good grounds with all of them, but rather on shaky ground with everything. We need to embrace non-violence and tolerance, like Jesus taught, but you can't just stand there shouting "tolerance, tolerance" anytime we discuss the issues. There is either an objective truth or there is not. If there is, we must find out what it is and live in accordance with it. If there is not, we must turn mankind away from the dreamy distractions, find our own truths, and devote ourselves to increasing the good for all. If there is a God, he, she, or it must be related to in the way that he, she, or it demands, or else we must be preparred for the consequences. The Christian God is irreconcialable with the Hindu gods, and Allah is not comperable to the nature spirits of the neo-paganists. It boils down to this either a given religion or creed is true, or else it is false. If it is true, we should all embrace it. If it is false, then we should all reject it. There really isn't room for a "I believe everything" middle ground. If you believe everything, you really don't believe in anything. Take a stand and make a choice.
1 person likes this
• Thailand
11 Feb 07
The basic good in all religions is the basic teaching of the brotherhood of man. I am not sure what answers to basic questions you are referring to so please enlighten this poor ignorant fool. I am not seeking to be on good grounds with any religion. I think I stated where I stand but if you did not understand I will try again. I believe in the basic good of humankind and a universal conciousness. I do not necessarily believe in any defined god. I do not believe any religion is better or worse than any other one so I will take my stand with the collective knowledge of humanity and believe in what can be proven, not in a Bronze Age fable.
1 person likes this
@dickkell (403)
• United States
12 Feb 07
The brotherhood of man is not taught in all religions except in the fact that we all have a common anscestery. I don't believe you to be an ignorant fool, but if you say that all religions teach some common concept of goodness of man or unity of mankind, you are not looking beyond what the dictionary says about these religions. Look past, into what they actually say, and you will find that there are a variety of religions because people do NOT agree. Some of the basic questions are :What is a human being? Where did we come from? What are we made of? Who or what is responsible for the evil in the world? What happens when you die? What are the moral precept that should govern a good life? What IS a good life? What is the relationship of the rich to the poor? The weak to the strong? How can we know good from evil? What should be the course of a man's life? Is there a God? What is the nature of God, and, by extension, what is the nature of nature? What is reality? What is truth? What is untrue? To whom or what can we turn in times of hardship? Is there ultimate justice? Why do bad things happen to good people? DO bad things happen to good people? ARE THERE ANY GOOD PEOPLE? To say that you stand on the accumulated knowledge of mankind is, to me, an absolutely untennable position, because, at the end of the discussion, the best answer that reason can give is "I don't know." The more we think we understand, the more reason has to pick apart. The more we know, the more we know that we simply don't know. Doubt is a pretty shaky ground on which to base a life. Philosophically, doubt and the sledgehammer of reason are enormously helpful, but in the moments of felt passion, reason offers no consolation, no answer to the questions that matter most when we need answers the most. You believe in the basic goodness of man, then explain to me why, if all religions basically advocate not killing each other, why so many people are murderred so brutally every day. Man has been trying to do the right thing for thousands of years, and yet we are no closer to solving violence, or hunger, or hatred than we were two thousand years ago. And, if there is no eternity, there is no eternal accountablility, and thus, no real reason to do anything for the common good, because, in reality, people are very, very bad, and those who go out to do good works from a humanist standpoint quickly find that no matter how much you love someone, they can still hate and kill you - witness the murders of peace workers in Iraq, and without some outside driving force, the brutalility of the real world will snuff the goodwill of most of mankind. Christians can love even when they are hated because they know that God desires for them to love, especially the unlovely, because, at their core, they themselves are, or in any case were, absolutely unlovable, and yet, in spite of themselves, love reached down and touched them anyway. Any honest skeptic will be forced to admit that science is bound by the material, and that there will always be truths that are beyond it's reach. Unfortunately, these are the very truths that the deepest parts of us cry out to know - thus, even among the scientific skeptical, faith is nevertheless strong, in many cases strong than that of religious persons. I refuse to accept your self proclaimmed unlabelability because it is not true. If you despise religions, say so. If you find the concept of God or eternity untennable, admit it. But do not stand by and say that you are the best of everything and the worst of nothing. I own my label, and with it the good and the bad. I do not shy away from the ugly truth in favor of a superficial beauty, nor do I hide from the glorious beauty that of truths unveiled by my faith. All I am saying is that those among us who refuse to be "labeled" are accepting superficiallity to keep from knowing themselves and comming face to face with reality, be it grand or grotesque. To me, hiding above the label is the most hypocritical of all possible positions.
1 person likes this
@tigertang (1750)
• Singapore
17 May 08
I think lables are pretty limiting and I sympathise with people who say they follow all religions. On a personal level, I pay my respects to all holy places whenever I pass by them because, well they are holy to quite alot of people and when enough people find something holy, it often becomes Holy. When I look at my life, I've been blessed by all religions. I have inducted into the Buddhist faith, studied Christianity at school and today my kindest and most most decent paymasters are Wahabi Muslims. So, while many of these faiths are doctrinly incompatible in so many ways (Both Islam and Christianity focus on the supremacy of a single God, while Buddhism is a religion without God) they all offer something and it's up to the indivdual to decide what is right for him or her and what is useless. I take Bruce Lee's philosophy of Jet Kun Do on this issue - the best style is the best style for the individual. Too often, when it comes to religion, we often get so carried away with the word of the holy scriptures, so much so that we forget the basic spirit. If you think I'm talking gibberish, take a look at history. More wars have been fought over religion than any other issue. And ironically more often than not, most of these wars have been fought by people of the same religion because of a different interpretation of Holy Scripture. Look at Mylot discussions that involve Jews, Christians and Muslims. All of them claim to worship the same God and yet, if you look at such discussions, you cannot escape people calling each other nasty names. Then look at the Middle East and you'll find Sunni's and Shia's killing each other even though they are all Muslims. Why, because they couldn't agree over what someone said in the dessert all those years ago. And Christians are not much better - just look at Northern Ireland, which has come out of a millenia long war between Catholics and Protestants. But does that mean that both Christianity and Islam are useless? I don't think so.....they both make sense in so many ways if one takes time to understand them. So, don't rush into having a lable for yourself. Take time and discover what is right for you and accept that what is right for you may not necessarily by right for someone else.
• Kottayam, India
14 Nov 07
Know your God and Love your neighbor that is all we need.
1 person likes this
• Kottayam, India
18 Nov 07
Let His worthy name be praise.
@misskatonic (3730)
• United States
12 Feb 07
Humankind will always seek to label people. Because there are too many people who can't understand something unless they peg it into a pre-made box they already understand. They can't comprehend something that has no name, has no label, has nothing they can't use to call to mind preconceived associations. It's a sad fact of the human state. Everything needs to be clearly marked and packaged or else it's intangible. I don't believe in labels, myself, but labels believe in me.
1 person likes this
@Margajoe (4721)
• Germany
14 Nov 07
Hi! I totally agree. It is your choice to choose what you want . You donĀ“t need a lable. You need Love in your heart to carry you to the right place in life. That is what ever you choose to call it. As for Gandhi, sounds interesting who is Gandhi? Thank you. Take care.
@Margajoe (4721)
• Germany
18 Nov 07
What a better world this would be, was a song.Right? Take care. Have a nice day.
@urbandekay (18314)
5 Mar 08
Concerning Ghandi. Einstein once said, "Generations to come, it may be, will scarce believe that such a one as this ever in flesh and blood walked upon this earth". There can be no doubt that Ghandi expresses religious ideas both from his own Hindu culture and Christianity through the influence he admits to of the writer H.D.Thoreau. War goes on till men refuse to fight. all the best urban
@blueunicorn (2410)
• United States
14 Nov 07
I couldn't have said this better myself. You could have been describing me!