Is jail time for five minutes a day acceptable?

@shywolf (4520)
United States
February 11, 2007 12:38pm CST
There is now a program in La Crosse County in Washington that is a low-cost alternative to building more jail cells - known as "day reporting", felons have to appear before county staffers once a day, or whenever else they are asked to appear, to work off their jail time and 'pay their dues'. What do you think about this? There is a lot more detail if you wish to read more here: http://www.davesdaily.com/out.php?id=24439&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.jsonline.com%2Fstory%2Findex.aspx%3Fid%3D563326
16 people like this
38 responses
@lauriefnp (5112)
• United States
11 Feb 07
My first reaction when reading your initial discussion was that they were getting off too easily, but the article made me re-think that. It actually makes a lot of sense for non-violent felons. Besides the cost savings, which are always a big issue for taxpayers, it keeps these people out of the prison population where we know they only make more "contacts" and learn more criminal behavior. It encourages them to followthrough with holding down a job and maybe going to school. It teaches them the importance of keeping a schedule, keeping appointments, following rules, and responsibility. These are all things that being incarcerated for years do not teach them. It's great that there is a zero tolerance policy for missed appointments, and I'm sure that the participants will generally take that seriously. It will be interesting to see how this plays out, but it does sound promising.
3 people like this
@jahvo6 (623)
• Peru
12 Feb 07
Probbly it´s a good thing but it must be tested and wait more time for results, 5 minutes sounds like joke but who knows.
11 Feb 07
For crimes where people haven't been hurt or abused this would be a great idea. It would help reduce the overcrowding in prisons and reduce the cost to the state of prisoners being locked up.
3 people like this
• United States
11 Feb 07
It sounds much like probation. As I see it, unless the person was given probation - I don't see why they should be treated like they are on it. If someone is supposed to be in jail, then they should be in jail. In my town, if you go to jail you have to pay [$5 or $10, I can't remember] per day you are their. I'm not sure which is more dumb though, our jail rules or their's. I know if I went to jail, I wouldn't pay the debt for being there against my will.
@mahayla (192)
• United States
12 Feb 07
i don't think thats legal?? is it? to charge someone for being in jail?
@rosie_123 (6118)
11 Feb 07
Well, I guess it would depend on the severity of their crime, and many other factors. Here in the UK, we have comminity service for lesser offenders, and also a system of "tagging", whereby the offender does not have to be in jail, but is under a curfew, and has to be at home, or in some other specific place between certain hours, as well as regular visits to the Police Station to "check-in". As I said it would really depend on the crime, in my opinion.
2 people like this
• United States
11 Feb 07
I'm thinking "house arrest" would work better perhaps?
2 people like this
@uath13 (8207)
• United States
11 Feb 07
Depends on the crime I guess. I doubt it was only 5 minutes. Its probably more like daily community service.
2 people like this
• United States
11 Feb 07
This actually not a bad idea, especially for nonviolent crimes. In California, the prisons have become a lethal powder keg, overpopuated to bursting, with completely failed medical care. What will occur in the Washington experiment is that nobody will show up for their appointments. Then what do they do?
@kgwat70 (13396)
• United States
12 Feb 07
I definitely do not believe that this acceptable and should not be done. They are basically giving criminals the right to go out and commit more crimes. I think this would be very bad and make many people uncomfortable and unsafe. If they commit the crime, they need to do the time as far as I am concerned. I would not allow them to be able to do more harm to others. Many of these people may decide to not show up for their court appearance and may skip town or something.
• United States
12 Feb 07
But say that you committed a minor crime..like went through a traffic light or other..something lesser..wouldn't you like a lighter sentence?
@yanjiaren (9050)
11 Feb 07
is that a joke or something? why don't they make them do some community service..? and help clean up the neighbourhood or something? not just sit on theur butts enjoying the sunshine..
1 person likes this
• United States
11 Feb 07
Hmmm, interesting concept. But would it really work is what I'm wondering about.
1 person likes this
@jacton (272)
• India
14 Feb 07
yes
@cripfemme (7715)
• United States
13 Feb 07
I think this a good idea. It let's people stay integrated into their communities and to maintain their working life an school as well, which is always a plus. I'm sure the screen well for addmission into the program.
@brokentia (10396)
• United States
13 Feb 07
Burglars are included in those felons. Why would I want someone that is known to be a felon, breaking and entering, running around and not serving their real time? This is a joke! Felons are not going to take time served seriously. I know it "saves money" and their idea for "self rehabilitation" sounds all good. But the next time they think of breaking the law they will think what??? Gee, that just means they have to check in once a day. Sorry, but I think this is a horrible idea.
@AskAlly (3627)
• Canada
13 Feb 07
Big deal! What a trade off. A few minutues of inconvenience and you go back to what you were doing. Stay at home moms have stiffer sentences. Not much of a deterent to commit a crime or re offend.
@smartpk (193)
• Pakistan
12 Feb 07
you must be more careful about prissioners and ask them also regarding jail problems and often spend time with them to improve their habbits and get work from them and train them in different aspects of life.
12 Feb 07
Part time jail could work for some minor crimes that can't really be punished with a fine but a proper jail sentence is going over the top. Back in the early sixties South Africa had such a scheme where minor offences, like none injurious motoring offences, shop lifting, drunkeness and the like were dealt with by a period in jail. The sentence would be xxx hours and the offender would have to spend a minimum of 48 hours at a time by prior arrangement. So a drunken driver might get 600 hours in jail where he could opt to spend each weekend serving his time. This meant that he could still earn a living whilst at the same time paying his debt to society.
• United States
12 Feb 07
I say go for it as long as they're not "violent" felons or prone to be a repeat offender.......
@sourav9 (122)
• India
12 Feb 07
Obviously not acceptable. Crime is crime whether it is as simple or deadly one. Because respect once gone cannot be brought back by any means.
@Kate06 (123)
• United States
12 Feb 07
so, instead of actually going to jail you get to sit in time out for a while? Do they get a nap time as well? This seems a bit humorous to me that some officials actually think this is an equivalent to jail.
• India
12 Feb 07
What I know is this that it is not a 26 minutes old question. Whom you are you trying to defraud. Please don't devalue the internet or it has been raised ( THE ISSUE) why USA can keep controle over it. While you are making monkey out of yourself don't think you are making some one else.