It's only words? Is that so?

India
February 21, 2007 4:57am CST
There are a lot of languages in this world. Each of them has got their own characterstics and significance. Very often, I come across some words from different languages, that sounds good to ears. Sometimes, it's just the word that is good, and sometimes, it's the meaning and the context in which it is said, that makes you feel good about it. One of the words, which I really like is from my mother tongue 'Hindi'. It's called 'beta' meaning 'son'. I remember my father saying, 'Beta, how are you?', and it feels so good to hear that word from him; the word has got so much affection in it, that for me it is one of the sweetest sounding words. Traditionally, one is more close to his mother (at least boys are!). It is easy to express ones love for his mother, you can kiss her, and say all that you have in your heart. But there is always an element of hesitation attached, when it comes to expressing ones feeling for his father and vice versa. Don't know the exact reason, but I guess that, mothers are for love and fathers are for discipline! At times I feel that, all fathers make up a fake (or better said 'extra') disciplinary personality in front of their child (especially if he is a male), so that too much of love by both parents doesn't spoil the child. And whenever I hear the word 'beta' from my father, it makes me feel that my father in that word, has packed all emotions of love, care and affection that he has for me, which otherwise generally remains unexpressed. Some other words that I like are - 'subah' (dwan), 'mausam' (weather), and 'fursat' (leisure). All there are 'hindi' (or better said 'hindustani') words, which gives a very good feeling to the ears, and a soothing effect to the heart. That is it from my side. Now, I would like all of you to share a few words of your choice, the ones which you like, and tell me, what kind of feeling you get, when you hear those words. Hope we can make a little colletion of good words here. Cheers!
11 people like this
17 responses
@sharone74 (4839)
• United States
21 Feb 07
I gotta say that I love the way in which you expressed why the word means what it means for you. That is beautiful, hopefully your father will read it someday or maybe you will stop and tell him before he passes on. Now back to happier subjects. Words. Serendipity-just meant to be Epiphany-moment of total and utter clarity Interest- I don't know why I just love this word along with the lesser used word Pique-to garner ones attenetion in a negative or positive way. Pique someones interest. A fit of pique etc. Family or the Spanish-familia-we all know what that means and though I am not all that big on my folks family is still a very happy word to me.
• India
21 Feb 07
I hope he does:) Yeah, serene is a good word, one can feel the calmness in it! So, you see the magic! Words do magic sometimes, isn't it! Heres another on - fusion, i like the appeal the wrod carry, and it has a very good meaning too - when two or more things meet for a better result ! Cheers!
1 person likes this
@Willowlady (10666)
• United States
21 Feb 07
Our American English is such a convoluted language. An orange is a color and a fruit. Some of our words are from other languages and then bent to allow us to pronounce them. There is a dumbing down going on in our country since something bad is really good. Also to say to kill someone is not a threat anymore since it is just something they said. Words can be powerful and so descriptive.
2 people like this
• India
22 Feb 07
You are right, words can be powerful, and descriptive. We say it 'ada'(style) - to kill with ones eyes! haha, pls dont mind the novice translation!
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (60895)
• United States
22 Feb 07
I have a tee shirt that says, "English doesn't borrow from other languages. It follows them down dark alleys, knocks them over and goes through their pockets for loose grammer." English, and not just American English, is a composit language. It came about from the "middle class" having to communicate between their Norman overlords and the Saxon peasentry. It is the only language where the animal on the hoof (or wing) is different from the animal on the plate. It happily steals from other languages - orange being a good example. It comes from Farci (sp?) the arbic/middle eastern language for the fruit. I heard an interesting artical on Weekend Addtion of All Things Considered about how the more complex a society become, the more they need to label & differeniate colors, so the fruit is, no doubt, where we also get the name, before it might've been called, perhaps "a yellowish red" or some sort.
2 people like this
• United States
22 Feb 07
great discussion, you really wrote it well :) Hearing the word "peanut" gives me a good feeling, it is what my father called me when i was little. hope-just the sound of it seems to convey it's meaning to me. Plus so many times all we have to hang on to in life is hope aqua- i just like the way it sounds and it reminds me of my childhood and preschool for some reason peppermint patty- again reminds me ofmy childhood-my grandma always gave them to us when we vistied and also reminds me of the charlie brown charactor and that cartoon reminds me of my childhood as well. you might be picking up on the theme that I had a very happy childhood and I miss those times!
2 people like this
• India
22 Feb 07
haha! Ok! I got it Ms.Peanut!
1 person likes this
@mywords18 (645)
• United States
22 Feb 07
yes very true its only words.......make me rem. the lovely song of band "boyzone", well for me the greatest word is "love" and "understanding" and the most soothing words are words which i hear from my love's mouth no matter wat they are i simply love them.
2 people like this
• India
22 Feb 07
thats was sweet, yeah, its not only the words, but also the sincerity, with which they are spoken, is what counts, and it can make some simple words special:) Cheers!
1 person likes this
• United States
21 Feb 07
My daughter was born in France and I have always had a special attraction for the word "mignon' which translated from French means darling or small and dainty. Perhaps that's why a small steak is named filet mignon but I always think of it as a compliment.
2 people like this
• India
22 Feb 07
'Mignon' sounds sweet, and nostalgic too!
1 person likes this
@kathy77 (7488)
• Australia
21 Feb 07
Oh yes there are a real lot of languages in the world, yes you are right that mothers are for love and the fathers for discipline, well in my country the parents use the word pet a lot but this does not imply to any pet (dog or cat) it is used as an endearment a loving word to their children. We also call our children baby even when they are no longer babies due to they will always be our babies. Honey is another word we use but this does not mean the honey that we eat and can be applied not only to our partners but also to our children as we show that we love them.
2 people like this
• India
22 Feb 07
Those are sweet and cute words! I think another one that is pop there for 'pet' is 'pumpkin'! Am I right?
1 person likes this
@yanjiaren (9050)
21 Feb 07
i love some of our greek words.. manitsa..which has no description..it is like saying darling.. agorina mu...my little 'beta' lol i call my son and hubby that lol.. wo hao taitai..my good wife..my hubby calls me that in mandarin and i like it.. so hope these keep you going for a bit.. lovely topiv he na? bohut atchi baat hai!!
2 people like this
• India
22 Feb 07
You seem to have mastered all languages! Kudos! Yes, yes, thats good indeed ('bahut atchi baat hai')!
1 person likes this
• United States
21 Feb 07
I speak the english language, and my favorite words are 'i love you'. it doesn't really matter who says those three little words. But it always makes a person feel special when they are told that they are loved.
2 people like this
• India
21 Feb 07
Thats rigtly said, those words are simple, common, yet special. Cheers!
1 person likes this
• India
21 Feb 07
I like urdu/arbi words too, a few of them are 'fiza' meaning climate, 'soorat' meaning looks, 'ada' meaning style, and my fovorite is 'shukiya' which means thank you. I also like good sounding words from all languges. Sometime, it happens that, even if on dont understand them, still , he can get an idea about what they are all about by merely looking at the way they sound!
2 people like this
• India
21 Feb 07
Yeah, even i like urdu/arabic words. They sound great, dont they!
1 person likes this
@apsara60 (6612)
• Israel
21 Feb 07
I will start with the word MAA, I think almost in every language mother is called Maa, and how happy is a mother to hear this word, we don't have to ask. All know this. When hindi and urdu are mixed together it makes hindustani language, and hindustani language is full of beautiful words that have deep meanings and they can touch you emotionally. Some of the words that I like is zindagi (life), but not jindagi, proper pronounciation is very important.Kudrat (nature), (kubsuraat (beautiful) sawan (rainy season) sagar(sea),gulab (rose), haashina (beautiful girl) neela assman (blue sky) Muskurahat ( smile).......There is no end to this.. ........Hindustani in itself is treasure of beautiful words. It cannot be explained in few words. Urdu apne app meh ake shayri hai toh hindi meh gheraiye hi gheraiye hai. For those who are not indian. I am sure each one has liking for their language. And I as sure they will share it with you.
2 people like this
• India
21 Feb 07
You are right, there is omething about 'maa', every language has got that word, and interstingly, thats waht is taught to every child, 'say ... maaaa .. maaa!' In fact, thats the very word thats most of the child 'debut' their speech with! Thats what I have heard of .... whe samm kids are taught how to speak, thats what they say 'maa'.. I think its easiest to pronounce, and yes, it is one of the most beautiful words, and so are all mothere:) I too like to read urdu, its has got such great sounding poetic words, esepcially the 'shers', I love the way those 'shers' manage to say complex philosophies of life in two lines! I also hope, that we have lot of colorful collection words here:) Cheers!
2 people like this
@vanities (11387)
• Davao, Philippines
22 Feb 07
mine was our dialect which is tagalog..mahal means love..its a common words of endearment in couples and in a relationships..
• United States
4 Mar 07
I have a word that invokes emotion from me... a word I rarely hear. It is the Italian word tesoro meaning treasure. My grandmother used to call my kids that. Made me know how much they meant to her. Makes me think of that when I hear it and it makes me remember how much my grandma and I loved each other.
1 person likes this
@kelly60 (4548)
• United States
4 Mar 07
I speak the English language, and some of the words that mean a lot to me are love and friendship. The way I see it though is that it isn't just the word itself that expresses the true meaning. There is a lot more to it than that. The same words can be used in an angry tone of voice and will not have the same effect.
1 person likes this
• Namibia
22 Feb 07
There is magic and meaning in words. I do not know any Hindi, but some of our native African languages have words that just sound and feel wonderfull. Here is some Afrikaans words - see if you like some... Wonderlik - wonderful ongelooflik - unbelievable soetheid - sweetness heuning - honey have fun ....geniet dit...
@amosyor (54)
• India
22 Feb 07
language is not word, it is rather the expression comes automatically to every individual.
1 person likes this
@ljcapps (1926)
• United States
25 Feb 07
I like your discussion and the heart put into it. I completely understand it. My father has only told me he's proud of me 3 times in my life, so when i do hear that, i feel it deeply. However, there are no special words with attached meanings to them. Now, my in laws are different, although it's not necessarily the words behind them. My brother in law calls my wife, goober, and she calls him bumblebee. And they're simple words but with a wealth of affection behind them. My mother in law calls my wife, Squirrel, and her son, Moose. LOL following that, our son's nickname is Bugg. They may not be pleasing, but i can hear the love and affection behind them, and it always makes my wife smile to hear it.
@linda345 (2661)
• Canada
22 Feb 07
I love the words you have described and the meaning behind them. Where I come from Newfoundland, Canada we have a says and words that can be terms of enderment that seem strange to another person outside the province. Just this morning, I was talking to my daughter and I used the words my ducky. No I wasn't calling her a duck. It was like calling her my love. Sometimes I will say to my husband what are you doing old man. I am not being mean. Just another way to say my love.