Avoidable death

@urbandekay (18314)
March 1, 2007 11:15am CST
So a man died here because the doctor was not competent in English. Isn't it time we insisted on a test for foreign doctors and that parents have a responsibility to deliver their children to school in a state fit for education, which includes, as well as a reasonable standard of behaviour, a general competency in the English language all the best urban
2 people like this
6 responses
@crosa125 (1484)
2 Mar 07
what ever you say it's right,grass uper,how much did you sell me for?
@urbandekay (18314)
2 Mar 07
Noffin, b!tch wouldn't even make me a cake without blagging eggs off me all the best urban
1 person likes this
• United States
3 Mar 07
Hey! You better watch it, mister! No more cake for you! Ungrateful... *grumble*mumble* You better be careful or I'm going to tell everybody what you said in your sleep!
@urbandekay (18314)
3 Mar 07
What's with the no more cake? Not had any yet Frog Pimp all the best urban
1 person likes this
@rosie_123 (6118)
1 Mar 07
Oh yes - most definately. My friend was recently an out-patient in a local Hospital. She just had minor surgery that meant she came in for the day, and was allowed out in the evening. Not surprisingly she had a few questions before she left - just basic stuff about any side-effects she might expect etc., but none of the nurses or Doctors in the Hospital spoke good enough English to be able to explain it to her. I am not prejudiced in any way. My own Mother was from Eastern Europe, and my partner is from South America, so I know about the difficulties of living, and working in a "foreign" country, but if they both did it -so can anyone else - especially those with our health in their hands.
@urbandekay (18314)
1 Mar 07
Well said all the best urban
1 person likes this
@rosie_123 (6118)
1 Mar 07
Thank you. I thought it was a very interesting topic.
@shogunly (1406)
• Libya
4 Mar 07
Hello ,urban ! I wasted almost 6000 dollars on exams and a trip to the UK to sit for the PLAB exam with the General Medical Council (GMC) . Although I failed the final test (the reason is irrelevant ,I got almost full scores in English (8.5 out of 9) and the theory exam , but in the VIVA exam I got a PANIC ATTACK triggered by my INFERIORITY COMPLEX with CAUCASIANS on one hand ,and by the obvious LOATHING of some of the INDIAN examiners ) ,inspite of that , I could see from the examples of other doctors from my country there and from the overwhelming predominance of INDIANS that my chances were slimmer than slim at getting a job even if I had passed the test . The INDIANS have the advantage of having COMPATRIATES in all hospitals and boards within the UK , plus they are on the average SEVERAL years younger than me , which allows them to work for free (attachment) for many years before actually getting a paying job . Most of them had bad English , EVEN THE INDIANS ON THE EXAMINATION COMMITTEES !! Another group I found disproportionately (with their skills) represented were AFRICAN doctors , the color of their skins seemed to work like a charm (on chicks ,too ) and they get employed right away ,as if the employers were atoning for something that way . .To put in nutshell I disregarded the UK as a job alternative , I am now trying for Canada or US , do pray that I get a job there ! (people less experienced and younger than me and with lower grades both in medicine AND English left this country and landed jobs paying 10 , 000 Canadians /month , whereas I am working for only 200 US dollars /month :( !!!
@urbandekay (18314)
4 Mar 07
Hi, I'm not sure what to make of this, why do you think the Indian examiners were against you? Yes well, now you know how it is here, people call it by the misnomer of 'positive discrimination' and preference is given to people of different colours. Of course, all discrimination is still discrimination and such confusions distort interaction despite the good intentions behind them, but African's are often good English speakers in my experience. all the best urban
1 person likes this
• Netherlands
5 Mar 07
Yeah I believe that if anyone is living in a country that speaks a language different than their own they should learn this language. Doctors, school children, teachers, customer service reps as well. What can you contribute to that society if you can't properly communicate?
@mcrowl (1050)
• New Zealand
2 Mar 07
Yes, it's not good if deaths result from a language problem. Here in New Zealand, we see the other side of the coin. Highly skilled and competent professionals who emigrate here aren't able to get jobs because of the language issues. It's a kind of catch 22
• Canada
1 Mar 07
Thats shocking that this sort of thing can happen, but it doesn't really surprise me. It does surprise me though, that educated people like this doctor don't make a real effort to learn the language properly. It also surprises me that any country would let a doctor into the country, recognize their qualifications and allowed them to practice, but not care about their language skills... thats just pathetic... This thing must happen in the US too. I was just watching a rerun of Seinfeld last night, and it featured a doctor who didn't know English. It was funny on TV, but in real life it is disgraceful.