In this day and age

@hookfan (447)
March 19, 2007 3:44am CST
I couldn't believe it, in this day and age of equality and awareness, it's inexcusable really. A girl in her late teens has emailed me. She has the same eye condition I do and has asked me if people with our eye condition can work? Her mum doesn't think she'll be able to work, be hired or be able to have a job! Unreal! Her mum isn't that old and to be so ill informed, well, it boggles my mind. Her daughter definitely wants to find a job that will suit her (and her eye condition) and to do something she will enjoy. Why not encourage her instead?
1 person likes this
3 responses
@weemam (13389)
14 Apr 07
I hope you wrote back and told her what you have done and all you have achieved in your life pal , It should give the girl and her Mum a lot of encouragement , You should be really proud with what you have done with your life xx
@hookfan (447)
15 Apr 07
Oh yes, I did email her back and have also emailed with her mum who just isn't sure that 'blind people' can manage on their own, have a family etc. From what has gone on conversation wise - she just doesn't think LOL I did tell her what I've accomplished and what I'm currently doing so hopefully that will give her some encouragement as well as to her daughter. xx
@youdontsay (3503)
• United States
14 Apr 07
Some parents are WAY over protective of children who are differently abled. All they see is the "weakness" of their child, take it personally as a sign they have failed somehow, and become martyrs to "take care" of them the rest of their life. There is no reason a person can't get vocational training if they are blind, unless there is some other disability that is more limiting. But I see blind people doing all kinds of work. When I was in college there was a young blind man studying to be a teacher and school counselor. I've seen blind people functioning like everyone else, living normal lives. Driving has special challenges, of course. But there are always taxi's and buses or even having one's own driver. And maybe I'd be concerned if my surgeon was blind. (smile) But I understand that they learn to tie knots with one hand and with their eyes closed. So . . . maybe . . . Encourage her to talk with a vocational counselor for the "handicapped." I hate that word, but that's what they use. Personally, I like "differently abled."
@hookfan (447)
15 Apr 07
She has been given all the information to help her along. Independence is something that she needs to gain if she's to live on her own as she'd like to. Standing up for herself wouldn't hurt either :)
• Australia
19 Mar 07
I agree with your words very strongly I have a physical disabilty and some thirty odd years ago I inocently asked my mother why me and the answer I got still boggles me I was told that thank myself lucky that I was a female and not a male as men need to work and as I am disabled I would never work. I was also asked to leave school as there was no point as I weould never work. Well I'm here to tell you I spent 15 years on a dialsys machine brought up a child on my own for 10 of those years studied psychology and domestic violence counselling I worked with life line as a voulunteer counsellor for 5 years and I was asked to work on the domestic violence hotline (paid work) which I did for two years. I now work in a office one day a week and I own a very sucessful online jewellery shop. although others attatudes regarding people with disabilities have moved forward in the last 30 years there is a still HUGE room for improvement.
@hookfan (447)
19 Mar 07
All I can say is well done you :) The thing that gets me is when people tell me 'you can't do that!'. It's surely the thing to drive me on to try it at least and more often than not to succeed :) It sounds like you have as well despite your mum's very negative words. Well done :)