Online college VS brick and mortar......

United States
March 25, 2007 5:54am CST
How do you feel about online college? Do you respect someone just as much who has a college degree from an online college? Do you think someone who goes to a brick and mortar school gets more respect and if so is that fair? Is there a difference if someone takes classes online at a college that IS a brick and mortar college? I am currently attending college at a brick and mortar college. For my first year I have gone to classes in person. I have tried an online class this semester and found that I love it! I love being able to get up out of bed and do my homework in my pjs. I also love that I can eat, drink and smoke while doing this. It just allows me so much freedom. I am considering taking all my classes online from now on (the ones that are offered). I am just wondering if I will be respected as much if I choose to go this route.
4 people like this
12 responses
@winterose (39922)
• Canada
25 Mar 07
the point is whether it is fair or not, you still have to get a job in the end, if that is your goal. Before taking online classes you have to investigate how many people get jobs in your field that have graduated from these courses. Many companies etc still will not recognize online courses.
2 people like this
• United States
26 Mar 07
You make a great point winterose. I hadn't thought of checking into that. I will do this. Thanks!
@ladyluna (7004)
• United States
25 Mar 07
Good morning Princeworthy, In part, the answer would depend on the field of study. For example: I don't beleive that I would trust a veterinarian who only studied on-line(heaven forbid). However, studying law, liberal arts, accounting, education, computer programming, etc ... would all be fine from an online institution. As to your question about if one is more respected than the other. If we're not talking about Ivy League, then it doesn't really matter. UofPhoenix has done wonders at rendering on-line study respectable. I suspect that the real factor in determining online or brick-n-mortar is how independent the student is. A typical 18yr old may do better in a traditional setting, until they develop strong study skills. Of course, there are exceptions ... some first year teens are highly motivated. So, they'd do well in an independent study setting. There's also the socialization factor. Brick-n-mortar offers great opporunities for developing greater social and communication skills. Especially for young people just entering the world on their own. Astute employers may see brick-n-mortar degreed individuals with greater communication, interaction skills. Although this probably wouldn't apply to older, returning students. If the student is committed and interested in their study, I agree with you that on-line degrees can be truly advantageous.
2 people like this
• United States
25 Mar 07
Thank you for your respons ladyluna! I am going into the nursing field. But only my prequsite classes will be offered on the internet. Once i am in autual nursing classes I will have to attend tradtional classes.
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Mar 07
I still like the idea of attending classes in the campus. I am getting my MBA and was attending classes on campus, then I am expecting so I decided to take the online classes offered by the campus. I think in the future, employers will look closely on what university did you get the degree. If it is just a school that has no accreditation and just giving diplomas like crazy, then it is really worthless. But there are well known universities that are also offering online classes so I definitely would choose these universities rather than the fly by night ones.
2 people like this
@greengal (4288)
• United States
26 Mar 07
Taking a few courses of a degree online is ok, and isn't so looked down upon, but somehow a person who earns an online degree isn't considered equal to the one who earns it Certified Public Accountant) but the Board requires that I have so many semester hours in accounting, so an online certification will be of no use.So O guess because of these preferences, people tend to go with those who have earned a degree from a college than an online certification.
2 people like this
@valerfore (298)
• Singapore
25 Mar 07
If you are studying for a degree(the paper), an online college is useless as most companies do not recognise them. If you are studying to improve your knowledge, distinguished universities such as MIT already release their material online, you just need to search for them. Hence, I would say an online college is not worth it
2 people like this
• United States
29 Mar 07
While it's most definitely not fair for a student that goes to a 'brick and mortar' school to get any more respect than anyone else, I will admit that I may have a little less respect for them. And I wish I had a good reason why. Since 'brick and mortar' is the traditional way of going to college, I think many people have it instilled in their heads that other forms of post-secondary education are unacceptable. It's ridiculous though. But as was mentioned before, watch out for employers that may not accept online college degrees as a sufficient source of educational experience. And at the same time, I'll try harder to respect people taking online classes. =)
• United States
29 Mar 07
It does give the advantage of one-on-one with the teacher (office visit) but it also has it's disadvantages like all the partying that goes on.
• United States
26 Mar 07
I'm going to start college this fall and hopefully I'll be able to take everything online. I know I'll enjoy being able to be much more casual as I work, but I'm also hoping that this will give me time to have a full-time job, and there's also not the problem of showing up late (which I really need to work on, lol). Concerning respect, I don't think it should affect it at all, or at least not much. The only real difference will be the social aspect of college, and as far as most people are concerned, a legitimate degree is a legitimate degree, whether or not you went and sat through classes every day for years or not. If taking a clep test is equivalent to having the class, then surely taking the class on a more flexible schedule would be just as acceptable.
1 person likes this
• United States
27 Mar 07
Showing up late is also a big problem for me. This is one of the big reasons that I enjoy online classes, I don't have to be in class at a certin time.
@asteriskec (1074)
• Philippines
26 Mar 07
Generally, I still think that attending classes the traditional way is the best. You get to test not only the knowledge you've gained so far but also the way you interact with other people. Especially since you're taking up Nursing and that requires social skills somehow. I think you will still be respected as much because it really all still boils down on whether or not you've finished, you have the right certification/diploma from your academic institution and if you also have the drive to continue learning. I suggest that you check with the CGFNS and NCLEX websites to check if they now acknowledge online nursing courses.
• United States
26 Mar 07
I am not planning on taking my nursing courses online. I am only taking classes like Sociology, Math, and English online. Thanks for the information though!
• United States
27 Mar 07
I am an online college student and I love it. It seems its the way to go anymore because of the freedom it gives. I used to attend college where I had to sit in the classroom and what not and I remember just staring at the clock and thinking about all the other things I could be doing at those times. Ive gotten no criticism so if you ask me I prefer online college.
1 person likes this
• United States
26 Mar 07
My dear, only you have to respect yourself. It isn't for others to judge you or dis respect or respect you. I personally do not see anything wrong in how a person obtains their education. In fact, I commend you. So, do what makes you happy, and what works best for you. I have rated you another ++ for an excellent post. Now, get back to work. :) Hugs, M&M
1 person likes this
@catcai (1057)
• Philippines
26 Mar 07
I think people who graduated from an online course or college deserves as much as respect from people who graduated from a brick and mortar school. What’s important I guess is the proficiency of the graduate with regards to the course that they took up. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with studying online. Both cases have each their own pros and cons. Like for instance, yes taking up an online course is much more convenient and you just stay at home- and you have control of your time. But you’re also missing out on things like socialization with classmates, and school parties or any other events that are campus initiated. Besides, online colleges have opened more doors for people who would really like to have a degree but cannot be on campus as required. For example, if you're a mom who takes care of her kids or a baby perhaps, who still dreams of having a college degree but is unable to go to a college because she has to stay home to watch over the kids. With online colleges, here dream can still be a reality; she can still study and have all the time to care for her kids and even work. Also for some disabled persons who have difficulty in traveling around, they can still have a degree while at the convenience of their home or while undergoing therapy at least they will have more time taking care of their recovery while continuing their education. It doesn’t really matter where you graduated, It's not supposed to matter in any sense, what’s important is that you are qualified for the job and you know what you're doing.
• United States
25 Mar 07
I think getting a college degree via online is great. It is good for those who have a college degree and want to pursue further without any interference with work or family. Due to the advance in technology, online is just another method of delivery. Granted that some fields or professions would better benefit a student if done the traditional way.