have you experienced "culture-shock"?

Malaysia
March 26, 2007 6:24am CST
i have experienced this during my first visit here in malaysia.. everything is different..you have to adapt to their way of living.. some of it you might feel a bit odd.. malaysia is a moslem country.. one of the things i don't understand is "why are they so afraid of dogs..?" we have a dog.. so, whenever my mother has a malay visitor,,we have to hide the dog... and they have a thing about pigs.. they don't eat pork.. my mom said malays consider pork as the dirtiest form of food.. and one more thing malaysia is home to many cultures.. diversed.. there are chinese,indians,indonesians,pakistani,bangladesh and many more.. its just weird cause i am so used to our way of living back in philippines.. but now i am happy to say i have adjusted to their culture.. malaysia is a lovely place,you should come visit here some time..
5 people like this
27 responses
• Pakistan
26 Mar 07
Yes I do understand that adjusting in a new place is hard and not always easy. Well I think that they (Malaysians) are not afraid of dogs but rather Muslims believe that keeping a dog indoor drives away the Angel of Blessing. But it is okay to keep a dog outside your home for the purpose of guarding because no doubt that a dog is very faithful and I know that because I like dogs too. Coming to the issue of pork, pork is forbidden in Islam and that is the reason that Muslims do not consume pork and we regard it as the dirtiest animal. You could read more about it at http://www.irf.net/irf/faqonislam/index.htm just to gain an insight. And yes Malaysia has a lot of people from different back grounds but I do not see how they can affect you, they just go on with their lives. Yeah Malaysia is indeed a great place and one day I just might visit it.
2 people like this
@repzkoopz (1895)
• Philippines
26 Mar 07
hell yeah! but in my case, its more of war-shock-culture-shock. happened when i joined ROTC as COCC. i didn't expect to be in so much shock as i have a good idea of how officers are trained since i was an officer way back in high school. i expected people in there to be serious and all. but when i got in, i was in total shock of how crazy they are. thing is, they're crazy, military style. whack each other for fun, hang on trees for hours (i do mean the word hang, with your bare hands!), roll on the stairs from the 4th floor to the ground floor, man, it was fun, and likewise, agonizing! who the hell wants to roll on the stairs from the 4th floor to the ground? hehe.. the warshock part comes in where seniors do "their thing", you know what i mean. i didn't expect it to be that serious. darn! we got through it all anyway. c",)
1 person likes this
@ESKARENA1 (18299)
26 Mar 07
i experienced this the first time we went to Egypt. We flew in to Luxor, the first thing we noticed was the heat. Then as we got involved in the local community, we got invited to homes for meals and weddings and stuff. It was a massive change from England. A man came into the village bringing a basket full of chickens and we had to pick one to be cooked, just felt odd blessed be
1 person likes this
@crazynurse (7489)
• United States
26 Mar 07
Oh yes, I have experienced culture shock within my own country! A few years back I moved from a large, metropolitan city to a small, Appalachian coal-mining town. Boy, what a case of culture shock. I went from 4-star restaurants to locally owned greasy spoons. I went from malls to just a Wal-Mart. I went from many choices of heatlh care provideers to one or two. I went from law enforcement that provided equality with the law to 'good-ole boy' law that is based upon who you know and who's child you are. I went from well-educated people being the norm to well-educated people being the minority. I went from a city where most worked to a town where over half are 'on the draw'...meaning that they are totally subsidized by the federal government, despite the fact that they are totally able to work. They feign disability to get a check, yet get out and do odd jobs that would tax a well body! I could go on and on, but you get the picture!
@xyla_v (314)
• India
27 Mar 07
i think i am one of the persons who mourn the culture shocks happening in one's own country...When every one is praising about indian culture and heritage ,it seems to me that Indians have either ignored or unaware of their culture and try to imitate the western .....it is sad to watch when you lose your roots...
• India
27 Mar 07
ya u r saying the truth... not only youth all of them imitating western culture... no need to come and c the changes.. just switch on the t v and watch indian channel...or movie. who's wearing indian dress.. if any heroine wear sari that scene should be included rain...who knows their own mother tongue... ya need to learn others culture and languages but pls dont forget ours.. also u can accept good one but most of them accepting what the western want to change now... i think they are adopting our good cultures.. so we have to go there for seing our culture!!!!
• Brazil
26 Mar 07
I NAO KNOW MALASIA nao ii believe that it is very cold nai know more say
• Serbia And Montenegro
27 Mar 07
What's that? I don't understand what your saying. :D
• Philippines
27 Mar 07
The only time i experience a bit of a culture shock is arriving back to the city from the beach. This is very evident during the summer season. The heat can pretty unbearable when you reside in the city. And i'm not one of those people who can stand extreme summer days in the urban city. It's such a hassle to add on more clothes for when you leave your house, the excessive heat leaves you perspiring and sticky. It's not the way to enjoy the summer. As compared to being in the beach, when you feel hot, just take a dip in the cool blue waters. This may not sound like a culture shock. But in Europe, there are these naked camps where you can stay in with different people. The thing is during your whole stay in this camp, you are not allowed any piece of clothing. They say that when they return to their ordinary lives in the city, they have a difficult time adjusting to dress up to get out of the house. It's pretty much almost the same thing with my experience.
@thanuarun (290)
• India
27 Mar 07
these things are happening here in india too...i think this is not only malesian culture all muslims are doing the same... because according to hooly khuran...they r doing so...i have many muslim friends... very nice friendz... come to india ! u can c so many cultures.. so many languages...so many religion,casts...etc...each of this have their own culture...u may wonder!!!
@webbuff (926)
• Philippines
27 Mar 07
yes actually i did.. it was in India and Saudi and wow it really blew my mind... i cant really do things i usually do (e.g wear red shirt, eat pork, etc) because i may offend other people.
• United States
27 Mar 07
The closest thing I have had to culture shock was going to New York City in 2002. I went to the Bronx twice and well it was really different. First off me and my friend were going to the church (it was a mission trip with about 10 kids we were separated to different churches with kids) and we were like the only two white girls there. I mean you could feel the eyes on us walking down the street. It was a difficult culture for sure. I loved the little kids, it was fun hanging out. But at the same time it was a harsh reality of things I had never seen before. So thats the closest thing to culture shock I have had.
• United States
27 Mar 07
When I became the only Caucasian person in an all Latino neighborhood, that was a "culture shock" and that was here in my own home in California.
• Serbia And Montenegro
27 Mar 07
Malaysia actually mainly comprised of Malays, Chinese, and Indians. These are the people who made Malaysia originally. The others are usually immigrants, like Bangladeshi etc. who practically came to Malaysia for a better living and for work, or any other reason. More or less. I was born outside of Malaysia, but has been raised in this country. I'm used to it. So no culture shock for me. I went to Thailand and i liked the country too.
@mizrak07 (557)
• Philippines
27 Mar 07
Yes I have, you don't have to move to another country to experience it. During my high school days I was transferred to another school located in the city miles away from our province. I had a hard time adjusting to the new environment. It's a totally new place with new people whose behavior I can't stand. It took me months to adjust.
• Canada
27 Mar 07
You know I havent experienced the real culture shock that you speak of as in I havent been anyplace like that. But I often experience something like that when I go to the supermarket or mall and I look around and see all the STUFF! and feel the overload of it all! When I experience that I think of the people who immigrate to this country and can just imagine what they think. Iwould love to visit Malaysia. Years ago I worked with a Malaysian girl and she was delightful.
@aweins (4203)
• India
27 Mar 07
there wasn't any much of a culture shock as my hubby says when he went to mexico and he stayed there for more than 4 years roughly, we r indian and mexico is the only country which uses spices like us, and the roti ( chappati) eating country like us. it was so much different , but when he went to china it was a huge difference, he said that there culture, eating habbits r totally different its difficult to match them.
• Philippines
27 Mar 07
hi! Malaysia seems to be a wonderful place. Anyway, as for your question, i get sort of a culture shock but not so much when i visit the USA, especially when i travel by myself. In your own country, everything is familiar and even if you have visited a certain place many times in the past, when you visit again after a long, long time, its unnerving and once you land, you lose the familiarity of the place and get used to staying there all over again. So youre not from Malaysia originally? where were you from before you went to malaysia?
@smints8985 (1595)
• United States
27 Mar 07
Not a very tremendous and serious shock though, but kind of a shock. I studied in a Chinese school in the Philippines, and for the first 15 years of my life I have always been around Chinese classmates, of course we have Filipino teachers but the school environment was basically Chinese. So when I entered college, I was kinda not used to the setup that almost everyone is Filipino, and there was basically just 2 of us in our class that are Chinese. At first it was kinda awkward for some reason, I don't really know what. But eventually I got used to it in a couple of months time, maybe a less than a month I was blending in.
@towongfoo27 (2989)
• United States
27 Mar 07
Hi lexxie3, I experience culture-shock when I lived in Yongsan, South Korea, for a year via the military. It took time for me to acclimatize, but once I did, I enjoyed South Korea a lot more. I generally discovered that Korean families have more respect and are closer-knit than Americans families. I liked the scenery, and especially the mountains, they took my breath away being so beautiful. I also learned that Koreans like country and line-dancing, for we use to go to the country clubs or bars and the line-dancing is a big phenomena. It motivated me to try it for myself. Similarily, I enjoyed taking the subway everywhere. One time we went to Lotte World, which is like Disneyland in America. What I remember most is that Itaewon is for tourists via all the vendors, clubs, and stores. You can buy things in Yongsan for much cheaper than in USA. I get so bored with American culture. I want to travel again soon, but without the military this time.
@Writerbob (572)
• United States
26 Mar 07
When I was 19, I went to Turkey from the US, and I spent fifteen months there. The culture shock was total, but the people and country were such awesome forces that I find myself to this today being homesick for my second country. Tessekur edrim, my Turkish friends!
@Ravenladyj (22937)
• United States
26 Mar 07
Oh most definately and we only moved from Ontario Canada into New York USA! Ppl find it surprising that the kids and i experience (still even 4 yrs later but not as much) Culture Shock but anyone who has spent time in the U.S but are Canadian and visa versa SHOULD know what i mean...even though they are neighbouring countries, they really are very different in many many ways!