So, is water-boarding torture or not?

@anniepa (27280)
United States
October 31, 2007 8:30pm CST
What's so difficult about giving a straight answer to a straight question? Apparently it's pretty darn difficult for Bush's Attorney General nominee Michael Mukasey to answer. He's said things such as "It would depend on the circumstances." No, it wouldn't; it either is or it is NOT torture! I say, yes, it sure is. What do you think? Annie
1 person likes this
7 responses
@JaLuvYa (175)
• United States
1 Nov 07
Definately torture! I mean come on- they know it's torture! They don't care! Civil liberties are being taken away from American citizens- so you know how they feel about foreigners. This is just another episode in the greatest show on earth- AMERICAN POLITICS! But he knows if he says that it is torture, then he will be opening the flood gates for alot of charges against people who's back he feels he needs to scratch right now like... Bush- the one who nominated him right?
@anniepa (27280)
• United States
1 Nov 07
I must say I agree with you on all counts! I find myself very suspicious of anyone Bush appoints for anything by this time. For those of you here who support Bush, hey, I'm honest about my anti-Bush feelings, I just don't trust the guy one bit. Of course it's torture. There have been experts who have testified to this fact. There is a great possibility of terrible long-term effects of this practice as well as a real risk for a victim to suffer a heart attack or stroke. Again I must repeat what I've said in other posts - torture doesn't even work according to most experts in the field! Annie
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@xfahctor (14126)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
1 Nov 07
In a word, NO. I'm sure Daniel Pearl would have prefered this to being beheaded by a saw knife. They way some bleeding hearted, warm and fuzzy types have it, we would be having tea with captured insurgents instead of treating them as they are, criminals. To say the united states torures is not only a fallicy but an insult. You can be sure al quieda isn't debating they'r own techniques in the way the handle our people when they capture them.
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@JaLuvYa (175)
• United States
1 Nov 07
Scary :-\ Not everybody they capture and try to get information from is a criminal! So you are in favor of torturing people that may or may not have information? May or may not be a criminal? And bleeding heart, warm and fuzzy people... in other words people with a freakin' conscience are the only reason that many of us in this country have any rights to begin with!
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@xfahctor (14126)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
1 Nov 07
I have a consience, but it is for my own people before others. Sorry, Someone captured while shooting at you is a criminal. The other's, I never advocated "torture" but the way many have described it, they want to do absolutely nothing in the way of getting information. What exactly do you prapose we do? What for you would be acceptable? where do ou draw the line? What would our ideal interogation look like?
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@JaLuvYa (175)
• United States
1 Nov 07
You should draw the line at anything that you would consider a violation of your civil liberties if you were actually guilty of the crime for which you were accused. And I repeat- not all the people that they have apprehended are guilty! In other words there are some innocent people being tortured right now to get information that just simply don't have. But as long as you can sleep at night...
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@lancingboy (1386)
• United States
1 Nov 07
Um.....what exactly is water-boarding? I never heard of that before. If I hadn't seen the word "torture", I'd think it had something to do with watersports, like surfing or something. I don't think torture does any good. Aren't the people they torture, taught how to lie even under the most extreme circumstances?
• United States
2 Nov 07
Most of the people they torture tend to be innocent. People want somebody to blame, they find somebody to blame..and then those who don't deserve it get hurt. Anyway, water-boarding is when they strap you to a board, and you can't move. And then they hold youy nose closed and pour water continuously over you. And you feel as if you're drowning, and you COULD drown during this particular method of torture.
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• United States
3 Nov 07
Exactly. I read about the Witch Craze, and I've read about how the Inquisition tortured those people. Many cases we find that actually most of the people would lie so that their torturers would just kill them and end their suffering. If you're subjected to that constantly, you'll say anything just to make it stop. PLUS the guys they really want, the few real terrorists out there...they're TRAINED to withstand all different types of torture, and with their strong (though fanatical) beliefs, they wouldn't betray that even if they weren't trained to withstand torture. So no matter what, torture ain't gonna get alot of answers. ESPECIALLY not in a situation where someone's got a bomb and is gonna blow some random city up. *sigh* And lol. I know. It sounds like some water-sport you'd play on vacation or in the olympics right? The technical term for it is; "Simulated drowning", waterboarding's just easier to say.
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@xParanoiax (6997)
• United States
2 Nov 07
Yes, it's torture. When Mukasey said, "I don't know" I honestly made the "WTF?" face. It's just so ridiculous. There's nothing hard about defining what torture is. I looked it up in the dictionary for Pete's sake! "To cause mental or physical anguish" I thought even three year old's new what torture was! Anyway...just more insanity for the current American government. The Joy.
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@JaLuvYa (175)
• United States
3 Nov 07
Apparently common sense is not common :)Bush and others like him though, re-invent the meanings of words to suit their own agendas. You know - it's not war- it's a "pre-emptive strike". Or how about this one- the substitution of Sadam's name for Bin Laden for the attack on 9/11. You know... whatever they can pull off these days.
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• United States
3 Nov 07
Oh, I know dearie. Common sense really should be common, but it's definitely not these days..ESPECIALLY not in the government. I daresay Bush and Co. do this all on purpose and not out of pure stupidity either...and this, frighteningly enough, may be the least of their crimes. Sometimes I wonder just how mad the world is, to tolerate such things lol.
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@RosieS57 (889)
• United States
1 Nov 07
Since Bush and Cheney both say the US doesn't use torture, let's have them volunteer to be subject to it publically and then stand up and say that waterboarding isn't torture. Seems it would be a real patriotic duty to prove that it isn't, since rthey insist that it isn't. If not them due to old age, then perhaps one randomly chosen kid of theirs to take their place. Now that couldn't possibly be torture to see your kid go thru that, could it? (heavy sarcasm)
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@anniepa (27280)
• United States
1 Nov 07
You're gunning for another BR, RosieS57! That's priceless, I'd love to hear someone say that directly to Bush or Cheney, if it's so harmless let us see you or one of your daughters go through it and we'll agree. But, of course, with this gang what's good for "everyone else" is rarely good enough for their own. Thanks to everyone for their posts here, and I've gotta say this is going to be a tough one to pick a BR for.
@JaLuvYa (175)
• United States
1 Nov 07
I have to agree that was a great line Rosies57. I wish I would of that of that myself- lol.
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@bobmnu (8160)
• United States
1 Nov 07
He responded to a question by saying that he was personally opposed to water boarding but could not say if in a legal sence waterboarding was torture. That was a typical Lawyer answer. He then asked what water boarding was. I have heard two different descriptions of water boarding. Both involve straping a person to a board and one you tip the board into a pool of water and hold the person there until they almost drown. The second method is to strap the person to a board and cover their face with a cloth and pour water over the cloth giving the person the feeling of drowning. In the first you could die and in the second you are in no danger of dying but you have the sensation of drowning. The second has produced information that is valid and useful. I am not a lawyer but according to some people the first is clearly illegal whild the second is open to different inteerpertations. According to many international treaties and laws because the life or limbs are not in danger it is not really torture.
@Latrivia (2889)
• United States
7 Nov 07
Ah, but that's the beauty of the situation: whether or not water-boarding is torture is a matter of pure circumstance. Those circumstances being that it's only torture if anyone *but* America does it. We've prosecuted war criminals for using the exact same technique, citing it as torture. We've outlawed "submersion" of the head in water, yet pouring water over a covered face and forcing it into the nose of the victim, while not technically submersion of the head, still simulates the same thing as the outlawed torture technique: drowning. If water boarding were used on the officials who like to claim it isn't torture, they'd change their tunes really quick. It's easy enough to say something isn't as bad as it really is when you haven't been subjected to it. Plus, they like to give the illusion of getting results - which is why they use a torture technique to force what they want hear from the mouths of their prisoners, whether it's true or not.
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