U.S.'s Space Race Future Slowly Unveiled

@theprogamer (10539)
United States
December 22, 2007 2:48am CST
Yes its me again! I found one other item I wanted to share and talk about. This one I couldn't skip up because I'm a science and space fan (should be obvious to friends that have gotten to know me). http://www.space.com/news/071219-weldon-nasa-shuttle-retirement.html Its a plan unveiled by a U.S. Congressman with some basic items on keeping the space program alive. A few new ideas are there, plus some proposals to improve NASA based on past events. Space and science goers I'd love your opinion on this. Everyone else too of course. Think the spending and spacetravel/research is beneficial to mankind? Think that more should be done, or less? What about other growing nations and their coming role in this area of science? There have been discussions on what can be acquired from the moon and nearby regions of space. I've stated and still think that the research is worth it and the acquisition of some elements and isotopes will greatly benefit mankind.
1 person likes this
3 responses
@pismeof (855)
• United States
22 Dec 07
I'd have to agree with you Progamer; Space travel should continue .As you mention numerous elements have been discovered on the Moon.We will be mining there someday. We also have to consider the commercial products that are discovered as a result of necessities required by the exploration itself. The biggest obstacle of course is the funding,with all the other economic short falls in the nations budget, there isn't much left for N.A.S.A.
@theprogamer (10539)
• United States
22 Dec 07
Indeed. Its important but requires precision, cooperation and input/effort from both public and private sector. Your final thoughts really hit home some good points. Materials are needed and can help humanity. The big obstacle is funding from either sector. The budget and economic shortfalls do put NASA in a critical bind. I wonder how this one will play out, I'll be keeping my eyes on it.
@SEOGUY (906)
• United States
22 Dec 07
Space the final frontier? It is only logical to exspand our knowlage of space and space travel. Today we are limited in travel in space becouse of the energy of the engines we create. Deep space travel will require much higher energy outputs to travel the vast distanse of space. Although Einstine hypothasized that the speed of light could not be broken the same was said about the barrier of sound. Space is a giant machine that uses the phisical laws of the universe and we are still learning about what is going on in first our star system, and secondly our galaxcy. I beleive one day science will find a way to travel faster than light and find a way to compensate that enersia of this speed using gravity and Einstines relitive theory of time/space. Useing the galaxtic gravitaional forces to bend space and letting deep space travel become a reality. Not useing massive engergy from atomic or plasma but just simply folding space like one would a shhet of paper.
2 people like this
@theprogamer (10539)
• United States
22 Dec 07
Well scientists are already aiming for the moon and other parts of nearby space for resources, elements and isotopes that could help technological and energy crisis on the planet. As for your other theories, they are great and I am a fan of them. Hopefully mankind does realize at least a couple of the theories, it could mean a lot for space travel and planetary living.
@AD11RGUY (1266)
• United States
22 Dec 07
I'm glad to see that this is being carried through! I read about this almost a year ago. The gap between replacement is far too large and would have a devastating effect on our space exploration, Hubble and space station maintenance, but to name a few. There has been a serious neglect of dedicated funds to NASA since Regan started his failed "Star Wars" campaign. We are really long overdue for some serious investment not only in NASA, but the private sector for space exploration as well. I can't wait to see Burt Rattan's ships in "mass" production! The cost savings alone will leapfrog what we can do with our continuous need for exploring the "outer limits".
1 person likes this
@theprogamer (10539)
• United States
22 Dec 07
Very true. Most importantly, I'd like to see more private sector involvement with the space program (and a lot of other things). Well that, and general development of this technology/field.