"We Can All Be a Little Late Sometimes...

@anniepa (27279)
United States
April 5, 2008 3:13pm CST
"We can all be a little late sometimes in doing the right thing," is what John McCain said about his original "No" vote on making Martin Luther King Day a national holiday. http://firstread.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2008/04/04/860317.aspx According to some reports McCain was booed when he spoke in Memphis, TN on the anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s death. What do you think - McCain supporters and detractors alike, do you agree we can all be a little late sometimes in doing the right thing? Is this one of those cases where changing one's mind is acceptable and there is no need to hold what someone may have previously thought against him? Annie
4 people like this
7 responses
@leeesa (885)
• United States
5 Apr 08
I don't trust politicians. I think they just say what they think we want to hear. McCain is obviously after the votes right now, so of course he will say something like that. But does he mean it? Usually the first thing that comes out of someone's mouth tends to be their true thoughts because they don't have time to think about it and make it "politically correct".
2 people like this
@anniepa (27279)
• United States
6 Apr 08
Also, I think he was given a pass, as usual, because nobody really got into why he'd been against it in the first place. Annie
@stephcjh (32327)
• United States
5 Apr 08
I do not think there is time to be a little late with things anymore in this country. They need to get on the ball and get something done before we all go under here. I always change my mind about these political people because they all talk the talk but do not walk the walk or know what to do to help all of us in the country.
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@Rozie37 (15499)
• Turkmenistan
6 Apr 08
While I believe that Martin Luther King Jr. was a great man, it is not everyone who feels this way. I feel that he deserved a holiday for what he accomplished for me and my people, again, it is not everyone who feels this way. We do not celebrate the birthdays of every American president. Only the ones that we believe are great in some way. So for John McCain not to jump on the bandwagon right away is acceptable to me. Maybe he did not know much about what Martin Luther had accoplished. I think that it would be fair to give him the benefit of the doubt on this one.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27279)
• United States
6 Apr 08
While what you say makes sense, Rozie, the fact is McCain DID know as much about King when he voted against the holiday as he does today; everyone did, it was widely discussed and broadcast at the time of the original debate about making his birthday a holiday. You would have been very young at the time but I remember it well. It's more than clear McCain did what he thought was best for him politically at the time and he's doing the same now. I firmly believe in giving people the benefit of the doubt and I also realize people often change their minds for legitimate reasons but in this case I don't think that applies. Annie
1 person likes this
@Rozie37 (15499)
• Turkmenistan
8 Apr 08
I don't know anything about McCain. I just would hate to know that someone prejudice is trying to become president. Someone has said that Bush stated he will do whatever it takes to get this John McCain guy as president.
@Taskr36 (13923)
• United States
8 Apr 08
Well Rozie, Obama is trying to become president as well and he's spent the last 20 years as a member of a racist church. His pastor and spiritual mentor over the last 20 years is a racist who thinks that white America is responsible for 9-11. I think a vote against MLK day 25 years ago is much less significant than 20 continuous years of calling a racist your spiritual mentor. A lot of people voted against making it a holiday back then. I think the vote was like 89-77. The country has evolved since then and I think it's reasonable to believe the people who voted against the holiday may have evolved as well.
@skinnychick (6906)
• United States
6 Apr 08
I would like to know why he voted no in the first place. The real reason would bother me a bit... But in the end, he did the right thing and I would have to give, even him, a little credit. I did say "a little" ...:)
@anniepa (27279)
• United States
6 Apr 08
Here's a bit of a history about Senator McCain. To those who claim this is a "liberal" source, note there are links to other sources backing up all of the information contained here. http://truth-about-mccain.blogspot.com/ The media loves him and he's called the "Straight Talk Express" but if you look deeper he's been anything but a straight talker for years. Annie
• United States
8 Apr 08
I would have to agree with you and the article!
@raydene (9874)
• United States
6 Apr 08
Yeaaa It always a good idea to say the correct things when running for office! xoxoxoxoxoxo
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27279)
• United States
7 Apr 08
That's for sure - and to say something different depending on who you're talking to. Annie
• United States
5 Apr 08
It seems to me that Mr. McCain has a long history of being late or never to doing the right thing.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27279)
• United States
6 Apr 08
You're right - then if and when he does it's just conveniently for political purposes! Annie
• United States
8 Apr 08
He had to say something.It is a fact that Arizona didn't want to make MLK Day a holiday. And the Only reason they made it a holiday was that they couldn't host the Super bowl without it. There were players that wouldn't go to Arizona until they celebrate MLK day like the rest of the country. McCain has to look like he trying to get the black vote. Too bad this isn't going to do it.
1 person likes this