how do they get their statistics for medical discoveries?

United States
July 20, 2008 10:13pm CST
im not talking about like the normal medical research where they ask people to try out medication im talking about the ones that later on they say "50 percent of all pregnant women that that upped their intake of vitamin D end up with babies that have a lessor chance of developing ________" i dont understand how they figure this out way after the fact.. how do they keep track? i dont see how they track down all the population and ten years after they have kids that might have a certain condition go ask their mom if they ate a lot of fruit etc?? and i mean obviously depending on how they search and chose people will alter the percentage of the results right? or do you think they have followed these people from birth to now? seems like some of these things they "discover" are by accident so you wouldnt think they had been looking for it all along to where they would have taken note of how much of whatever they took.. maybe im totally ignorant but i dont understand...
2 responses
• United States
21 Jul 08
I truly think that statistics can and are constantly altered to fit the situation. If it is a company that sells vitamin D of course they are going to have some sort of report from some sort of "doctor" to tell you that you need to take more because statistics show this can prevent you from getting blah blah disease. I wonder if there are statistics to show whether statistics are useful and accurate? :)
1 person likes this
• United States
21 Jul 08
haha good question!!
• United States
21 Jul 08
I'm not really sure. I often this wonder myself. Sometimes I think it's just by general observation. And that makes sense in a way. Also I think they can tell by looking at patient's medical records. And then they pass the info along to a doctor friend, lol. But I'm just taking an educated guess, lol.
1 person likes this