You did WHAT? Maybe you should have read the label?

@sulynsi (2834)
Canada
May 14, 2009 6:27am CST
I've wondered about the seemingly assinine instructions we read on packaging. "Lather.Rinse.Repeat" Uh, is it necessary to explain so obvious a procedure? And then you hear stories of people who didn't read the instructions, or who misuderstood them. Some years ago, I read of a woman who complained that the contraceptive method recommended by her doctor obviously didn't work, even though she used it faithfully. When the doctor suggested that after the baby arrived, he would put her on a different method, she said "Well, thank goodness, cause the stuff tastes terrible!" Upon trying a feminine undergarment at the recommendation of a friend, a lady complained that it seemed a great idea, but it wasn't at all comfortable and was "rather sticky". "Uh," her friend said, "you are wearing it upside down" Of course, packaging may be confusing even if you do your best to read it. When a gentleman came to live in a Western country, he was having a little difficulty with the language. He wanted to purchase food, but couldn't be sure what it was he was buying. He figured though, that things must be pretty much the same way here as at home. Food cans were decorated with certain pictures for certain food items. His meal was a little strong, but edible. The decoration was a nice picture of a cat. Have you heard of any funny misunderstandings?
4 people like this
11 responses
@byfaithonly (10716)
• United States
14 May 09
Well there is the really big one here in the US at least - coffee cups at McDonalds now must carry huge warning "Contents may be HOT". You would think most people would expect that a cup of coffee would be hot unless you orders 'iced coffee' but there was the lady who sued when she got burned by a cup of coffee. I've always felt bad for the lady who was burned but never understood why a company can be sued for delivering a product as it is expected.
1 person likes this
@sulynsi (2834)
• Canada
14 May 09
I think this must be the reason for seemingly silly labels. Companies must run into similar foolishness all the time. I always thought "dry clean only" on a polycotton shirt was definite back coverage!
1 person likes this
• United States
14 May 09
From what I understand about that particular case, the coffee was hotter than it should have been. I agree that it is common knowledge that coffee is served hot, unless you ask for it not to be. However, her lawyers simply found a loophole in the fact that the coffee was so hot it scalded her, and there was no warning label indicating this could potentially happen to her. It sounds rather ridiculous, but ridiculous cases like that are won all the time.
@Wizzywig (7858)
14 May 09
I used to like the instructions on solid stick deodorants which said " remove cap and push up bottom"... I bet there were people who did! There were also tinned meat puddings with labels saying "stand in boiling water for 10minutes" & we have "warning! May contain nuts"... on bags of salted peanuts.
1 person likes this
@sulynsi (2834)
• Canada
14 May 09
The one on the deodorant, that would be a weird visual! I hope noone has actually stood in boiling water!!! May contain nuts!? I've seen this one, too. I should jolly well hope so! Isn't that what I paid for? lol Actually the one about the boiling water makes me realize I have a confession to make. I LOVE reading the awkward and funny translations on labels, particularly in dollar stores.
1 person likes this
@arkansos (546)
• India
14 May 09
Well, silly as the instructions maybe, it is necessary for some equally as intelligent people. I do remember a witty one for a headache Balm "Step1: Apply directly to forhead. Step2: What part of apply directly to forehead did you not understand?"
1 person likes this
@sulynsi (2834)
• Canada
14 May 09
I love it when a manufacturer has the courage to say it like it is. Perhaps they should add "Remove cream from tube (or jar) and smear directly on forehead." I can just see someone using the tube like a hot water bottle! lol
1 person likes this
• United States
16 May 09
LOL! My son doesn't read ANY labels! EVER! One day I gave my dog a bath in my bathtub and left his shampoo on the side of the tub.. my son's bathroom was being painted so I told him to use MY shower.. and that he did! later that day I was sitting next to him and asked him what shampoo he used because his hair smelled like baby powder and I KNOW we don't have any shampoo that smells like that.. but our dog smells like baby powder! the dummy used the dog's shampoo!! I asked him if he didn't see the pic of the dog on the bottle... and if that wasn't a sign to him that it wasn't meant for humans! lol! nope! but the bright side is... he didn't have fleas or ticks! lol!
@sulynsi (2834)
• Canada
16 May 09
I hope he didn't start scratching his ear with his foot! lol Actually, I'd be more concerned if he'd used people shampoo on the dog! PH levels are different and some dogs are extremely sensitive. Shampoo gets EVERYWHERE on a dog.
@paula27661 (15898)
• Australia
15 May 09
Directions for use can be pretty funny. Many years ago I bought an interior sun shade for my car's windscreen; you know the silver foil like ones that you stretch across the front window to protect the car when it is parked in the sun? Well I purchased one, opened the box and the directions fell out: CAUTION: REMOVE BEFORE DRIVING. All I can really say is Dah....
@sulynsi (2834)
• Canada
16 May 09
lol Now, if THAT wasn't self evident, NOTHING is!
1 person likes this
• United States
14 May 09
I agree that some of the warnings are pretty ridiculous. Who would actually iron their clothes while they were wearing them!?! This is a funny story told by my coworker. It isnt from bad labels or misunderstood instructions, but the example of the pictures on the cans reminds me of this. It is nice that they can laugh about it now. My coworker and his wife are originally from Cuba and Puerto Rico. Just before all of the crap with Castro happened, his family moved from Cuba to Puerto Rico. That was where he met his wife. In the 70's they decided to move to the US. Not long after they arrived, they were expecting their first child. His wife went to a furniture store where she saw a crib she loved. She asked about the 'jello' crib. The sales man didnt understand her at first. When he did, he was laughing at her and making fun of her. My coworker had gone to a stock room at work about the same time. He asked for a 'jello' high lighter. The person didnt know what he was talking about at first. When they realized it, they corrected him. They told him how to properly pronounce the word yellow. In Spanish, the y is often pronounced as a j. Needless to say, they didnt buy the 'jello' crib or any other furniture from that store! Its really sad that more people wont help out immigrants when they can.
@sulynsi (2834)
• Canada
14 May 09
Jes, that's a common one! I love accents and English spoken with a pinch of Spanish, or any other language, is like adding an herb to a bland recipe. That's cute, thanks for sharing.
• United States
21 Jul 09
The label on the box containing an egg said, "Caution: Dropping on toes may be hazardous to your health." Somehow, I didn't even make it out of the store when that heavy object fell out of the box & ... landed on my toes. Like you seem to like to say: It's a hard egg nothing but a hard egg Uh - I guess it's time to admit it. You were right.
@James72 (26829)
• Australia
23 Jun 09
I've often wondered why they're so obvious with instructions on packaging at times too, but I guess when you consider how litigious society has become, when it comes to some products they have little choice really. I especially love the translated warnings you get to see on some of the Asian imports. One of my all time favourites is the knife I saw at a discount store that had been imported from China. Some genius had translated into English the warning "For external use only" Damn and I was going to use it to cut myself out of the stomach of a great white whale! Thank God I saw that warning before thinking about buying it..... LMAO
• Philippines
19 Jun 09
hi sul! i just want to share a funny story years ago about my youngest bro who's about 13 yrs old at that time. It happened during dinner when my mom kept on commenting about all the pimple breakouts he's having. My brother would irritatingly answer that it's normal for teenagers to have pimples and they will all soon go away at a certain stage. But my mom won't accept his reasons and kept on suggesting all brands of face wash and astringents. My brother then reasoned and said that maybe MY "face wash" he's commonly using is simply not for his skin type since his pimples won't go away.When my mom asked what brand it is, he said it's the pink bottle in the shower...then i told him that it's my feminine wash...Lactacyd!LOL!after that i bought the biggest bottle available hahaha! sometimes it makes you wonder if some people don't really know how to read or are simply too lazy to do so.
@mariposaman (2967)
• Canada
15 May 09
I think a lot of that started in the United States where the onus is on the manufacturer to provide all possible warnings or they will be sued. Remember an IQ of a hundred is only a median average, there are as many smarter people as there are stupid people.
@MrPKitty (103)
• United States
15 May 09
I once stayed at a Holiday Inn in Waco Texas. It had a pool and a kids wading pool. All around the edge of the wading pool the depth was stenciled. 10 inches, 10 inches, 10 inches and so on. The wading pool got no deeper, never the less along with the depth was the warning, "Do not dive into pool". I can only assume someone though 10 inches was pretty deep.