When you're deciding where to put your 'X' on your voting slip....

@Wizzywig (7858)
April 13, 2010 6:11am CST
Obviously no politician/party can please all of the people all of the time but, do you choose the candidate whose policies you really support or do you find yourself having to resort to picking the best of a bad bunch? I suppose the people who would opt for a "none of the above" box just wouldn't go along to the polling station.
1 person likes this
5 responses
@BarBaraPrz (25382)
• St. Catharines, Ontario
13 Apr 10
Even though there's no "none of the above" box, people can still indicate that by just not marking their ballot and returning it. These are counted as "refused", not to be confused with "spoiled".
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@BarBaraPrz (25382)
• St. Catharines, Ontario
13 Apr 10
One of the things you find out when you work as a poll clerk...
@Wizzywig (7858)
13 Apr 10
but, they may as well stay at home and not bother to vote at all really unless they feel that they're making some sort of point. Does anyone actually take any notice of how many are refused?
@BarBaraPrz (25382)
• St. Catharines, Ontario
13 Apr 10
Yes, they're entered into the record of votes.
@hvedra (1623)
13 Apr 10
I really wish the UK had compulsory voting but with a none of the above option. I know exactly who would poll the most votes in the election! The problem I have is that I've long realised they are the SAME bad bunch. Anyone in a mainstream party is representing corporate interests and not the voters.
@Wizzywig (7858)
13 Apr 10
I suppose "none of the above" is more pro-active than not voting which is interpreted as "I dont care". The fact that they are all expected to stand by their party means they are not standing by the electorate. There are, no doubt, MPs who are looking to procure a chairmanship at the end of their political career so will 'prepare the ground'.
2 people like this
@sblossom (2169)
13 Apr 10
As I know so far the UK has no compulsory voting system. So it means some people would give up their rights for the upcoming elections. I have a friend who is abroad now. He would like to vote, but he said his party or the party he supports is too small, totally no chance to win, so he doesn't bother to vote for them. He would choose one of the two bigger parties. However no one of them is his favorite. Also accoring to the census, just one of five first voters did vote for a party. it's not a good result anyway.
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@BarBaraPrz (25382)
• St. Catharines, Ontario
13 Apr 10
From what I've heard, it will be close between the two major parties and neither will have a clear majority, so it'd be to your friend's best interest to vote for his party. They could form the balance of power.
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@laglen (19779)
• United States
13 Apr 10
I vote for the person I feel best represents my views. You will never find somebody you agree with 100% of the time. We all have our own history and prejudices. So you have to weigh your issues and decide what is most relevant to you. I know here in the US, too many people vote celebrity rather than educating themselves on the views and principles of the candidate.
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@Wizzywig (7858)
13 Apr 10
Obviously, we have to go with the one that most closely represents our own views and it is very much a case of weighing up all the issues. I dont think our politicians carry the same celebrity status, despite their attempts to "sell" themselves
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@laglen (19779)
• United States
13 Apr 10
I would prefer no celebrity status. I think that draws attention away from the issues.
@Wizzywig (7858)
13 Apr 10
I agree. There's no point in being represented by someone just because they're famous... they need to have clear policies.
@RawBill1 (8541)
• Gold Coast, Australia
13 Apr 10
I find myself not being attracted to giving any of the candidates my vote each time as they all seem to come across as complete idiots who love themselves mostly. So I just give my vote to the Green party and then second and third choices to the small independent guys who have no hope of getting in, but may have views that are a little more extreme but good. The Green Party never get in, but their votes go toward deals to save environmental areas. So if they get more votes, then the major parties tend to take action on the greenies interests.
@RawBill1 (8541)
• Gold Coast, Australia
14 Apr 10
We have three levels of government here. Local Council, State Government and Federal Government and everyone over 18 years of age are legally required to vote. They fine you if you do not. (Providing they can find you of course!) I cannot remember which one is which, but in at least one of the levels of elections, we get to vote in preference from number 1 down to 6 or 7 or whatever the number of candidates is. In at least one other form, (perhaps Federal) we only vote for our number 1 pick.
@Wizzywig (7858)
14 Apr 10
We have Town Councillors, County Councillors, MPs and MEPs. The first 2, we get to choose more than one (in no particular order) & the others are just a case of picking one. There's no legal obligation to turn out.
@RawBill1 (8541)
• Gold Coast, Australia
14 Apr 10
Hmm, interesting. I thought that seeing as our legal system and government system was based on the UK versions that it might be a law that you have to vote there too. I know that it is not compulsory in the USA, but thought it would be in the UK. Lucky you!
@dawnald (84069)
• Shingle Springs, California
14 Apr 10
I do pull up a list of the issues and where the candidate stands on them, and I usually vote for the one who is most in alignment with my beliefs. Sometimes I just find the person repugnant for some reason, and then I will go with choice #2 or just not vote for that particular office.
@Wizzywig (7858)
14 Apr 10
That sounds like a good way of deciding. I think we can like a candidates policie but may know something about him/her that puts us off wanting them as individuals to represent us