Holland Lops

United States
January 23, 2007 9:47am CST
So this Christmas, as a gift to our child, we purchased a bunny. It is a holland lop. I rather think that he is delightful as a pet. I am curious about other people experiences with rabbits as pets. My husband and I are rather, NOT pet people, besides fish, and hermit crabs, my kids have been with out a pet. As discussion, I suppose I am hoping to hear from other rabbit owners, counsel, advice or simple "rabbit wisdom"! Let me glean from your knowledge...
2 responses
@mcmomss (2601)
• United States
23 Jan 07
We have a bunny that we keep in a cage, but he does come in the house sometimes. He loves to sit on your lap and cuddle. He even gets along good with the dogs. I've heard that they are very easy to litter box train, but I've never tried this.
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Jan 07
We are trying to litter train ours, it seems to be working, there is less and less poop on the bottom of the metal tray beneath his wire cage, and more and more in the litter box. I am so glad to hear that he gets along with your dogs! Thanks for sharing that, I wondered. What breed is your bunny?
@Pigglies (9336)
• United States
23 Jan 07
Be careful about wire floors! Does your bunny have somewhere to rest the feet? The easiest way to litter train is to put hay in or right near the litterbox at least at first. Then they'll eat and poop.
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Jan 07
we do have cardboard in there for him to sit on most of the time. Sometimes he messes it up and he goes with out, till we get more.
@Pigglies (9336)
• United States
23 Jan 07
You should definitely read www.rabbit.org if you've never had a rabbit before. The smaller rabbits actually tend to do worse with young children, but you didn't say how old your children are. The important thing is that you supervise, and that the rabbit is in a family area so that if the children neglect any responsibilities (if they have any), you'll notice. And also because children are unlikely to notice signs of illness. Spay or neuter when the rabbit is old enough to avoid health and behaviorial issues. I've found rabbits to be more territorial when kept in smaller enclosures, and thus more likely to bite. If at all possible, here's a set up that works well: linoleum flooring, puppy pen, a litterbox (can be filled with hay or you can fill a separate box with hay, but either way, grass hay is the most important part of a rabbit's diet), pellet dish (rabbits don't need many pellets, just a small dish), and a water dish (some people use bottles, I've found rabbits do better with dishes). Hope that helps! If you have any more questions, feel free to ask. I've done a lot of rabbit rescue education days, so I'm prepared for anything, hehe.
1 person likes this
• United States
23 Jan 07
Wow Thank you so much for all that information, I need to let my daughter read it too! We do the dishes, like you mentioned, and he loves it, and yes the hay, lots of hay, and we do pellets too. Do bunnies need salt licks?
@Pigglies (9336)
• United States
24 Jan 07
No on the salt licks, especially if you feed pellets (taste one, they've got salt in them (they don't taste too bad actually though, depending on the brand)). Usually they'll get too much salt if you put in a salt lick. You're very welcome. Hope it's helpful!
1 person likes this
• United States
24 Jan 07
Thanks for the bit about the salt licks, my daughter was so glad to know!