BEE COLONY COLLAPSE : An answer?

United States
May 29, 2007 10:59am CST
An organic bee keeper thinks he may have found the solution to bee colony collapse. Organic bee keepers are not having the same problems as other bee keepers. At the url below is this observant man's theory on how the bees can be saved. http://informationliberation.com/index.php?id=21912 So, what do you think? Does this guy make sense? He sure does to me.
5 responses
@beaniegdi (1966)
29 May 07
I knew there was a problem with bees vanishing but I had no idea that they where being made artificially large. I always thought of bees as natural and close to nature. We have bees that seem to have made a hive in my back garden just under my windows. I didn't want to kill them when I saw them but I think they may be a problem in summer as I thnk they will be coming into my house.
• United States
29 May 07
Like yourself, I had no idea bees were being made larger. I also had no clue that makeing them larger would increase their exposure to a parasite as their larger size required a larger honey comb that took longer to build. Who'd duh ever thunk it?
@shestalou (293)
• Canada
31 May 07
It makes alot of sense to me, I read that same article yesterday and its so true the mass media never gives you the whole story, thats why its always good to check out independent news programs and get the whole story.
1 person likes this
• United States
31 May 07
Yes, I have always liked to get my news from multiple sources. No one seems to report objectively and thoroughly. Multiple sources is the only way to get the whole story.
@Destiny007 (5820)
• United States
30 May 07
Yes he does make sense. Anytime you try to improve on nature there is the possibility of unintended results. When are people going to learn that nature already has a pretty good design in place, and we shouldn't mess with it? How about that idea of crossbreeding all of those years ago with domestic and African bees in order to increase honey production and pollination rates? It turns out that wasn't such a great idea although it did give the movie industry some new material for killer bee movies. Why not just leave nature alone and enjoy the benefits that nature provides?
1 person likes this
• United States
30 May 07
"Why not just leave nature alone and enjoy the benefits that nature provides?" Man is just too curious to do that. I do agree we need to be more careful or we'll end up like that proverbial cat. (curiosity killed it)
@lisaneuc (56)
• United States
29 May 07
"Who should be surprised that major media reports forget to tell us that the dying bees are hyper-bred varieties that we coax into a larger than normal body size?" --Bees on steroids...just trying to impress the Queen, I guess. Da next govuhnuh of Cal-ee-fornia could be a bee! :D
1 person likes this
• United States
29 May 07
These same bees are also hyper vulnerable to parasites because they have for generations relied on human pesticides to protect themselves as opposed to natural genetic factors. Thus over generations the natural immunity was unintentionaly bred out of these bees. We all remember where goes the road paved with good intentions.
@estherlou (5017)
• United States
29 May 07
How interesting. You find the coolest things to share with us sometimes! ..."Who should be surprised that the major media reports forget to tell us that the dying bees are actually hyper-bred varieties that we coax into a larger than normal body size? It sounds just like the beef industry." This sounds like an good reason to prevent tampering or genetic manipulation of our animals and food.
1 person likes this
• United States
29 May 07
Yes, as we have attempted to "improve" various different species to suit our needs, we have inadvertantly made things worse in ways that could not be anticipated. Even the use of pesticides and antibiotics to "help" the bees has had long term detrimental results. In an interactive interdependent dynamic world it just is not possible to tell what exactly is going to be cause and effect in every case.
1 person likes this