sound advice on recognizing stroke victims

@bgerig (1258)
United States
June 8, 2007 8:11pm CST
If you believe a person is suffering a stroke, you can quickly do this: 1) ask him/her to smile 2) ask him/her to raise both arms 3) ask him/her to speak a simple sentence If s/he has trouble with any of these action requests, call 911 (in US) immediately and describe the symptoms to the dispatcher. Neurological experts maintain that if they can get to a stroke victim within three hours of the attack, the ffects of a stroke can be totally reversed.
5 people like this
9 responses
@mummymo (23707)
9 Jun 07
There has been a big campaign here in the UK bgerig about this very thing! Good for you for highlighting it here my friend! Lets hope none of us ever need to know these things but at least if we do hopefully we will remember this post! xxx
2 people like this
• Philippines
10 Jun 07
yes, this is a very helpful post. although it is true that i do not wish to encounter this emergency situation in real life, it can always happen at the time when we least expect it.
1 person likes this
@Modestah (11188)
• United States
9 Jun 07
that is amazing, some of this is word for word what I wrote, other than perhaps some short hand, some of it is just arranged a little differently. check it out http://www.mylot.com/w/discussions/911511.aspx
1 person likes this
@bgerig (1258)
• United States
9 Jun 07
I am sorry for the duplication. I just read the information elsewhere yesterday and decided to join the stroke discussion and added my finding. Only now did I read your earlier contribution. I again apologize for the duplication. I was not/am not trying to claim authorship to the idea...I think it fairly well promoted by national or internation stroke advocates.
@Modestah (11188)
• United States
9 Jun 07
thank you, Bgerig. yes, this is very good information that bears to be retold again and again.
1 person likes this
@aprilgrl (4460)
• United States
9 Jun 07
I had 31 mini strokes couple of years ago. I remember the doctors asking me all thises questions and they do come in handy. I had the strokea t home and my hubby called 911 I was so scared and I had to learn to do things all over again like walk, haoling a pencile and forks I felt like a kid all over again but I fought so hard because I wanted to see my daughter graduated and I made it ti her graduation without using my cane. Thanks for sharing the iformation about it.
1 person likes this
@bgerig (1258)
• United States
9 Jun 07
and thank you for sharing your story. How are you doing now?
@aprilgrl (4460)
• United States
9 Jun 07
I am fine and back to normal thanks for asking :)
1 person likes this
@sizzle3000 (3038)
• United States
11 Jun 07
My mother just emailed this to me. She thinks that knowledge is power and she is right. I also hope that when something like this is actually happening that we have the good sense to remember this so that we can get the help needed immediately. I think that the more information you know the better off you will be in an emergency situation.
@bgerig (1258)
• United States
11 Jun 07
your Mother is absolutely right that information/education is vital. Thanks for sharing.
@jennybianca (12912)
• Australia
9 Jun 07
This is excellent advice. Strokes can be treated successfully if seen very early. My brother had a minor stroke 18 months ago. It was a big shock to the family, as he was only 45 years at the time. He was at work, in the toilet, & suddenl;y felt very odd. He had to hang onto the wall as he tried to get back to his office. He called for help, and as he is one of the Prison managers, A Docdtor from the Prison hospital was avaikable. He put him in the prison hospital & quickjly recognised thast my brother had suffered a stroke. An ambulance was called & he was rushed to hospital. He was out in two days & bsack at work in one week. They never found out what caused his stroke, & no blood clots were found.
@bgerig (1258)
• United States
9 Jun 07
that just goes to support the concept that early diagnosis and care makes a big difference.
@asmurthy (2462)
• India
9 Jun 07
A sudden loss of brain function caused by a blockage or rupture of a blood vessel to the brain, characterized by loss of muscular control, diminution or loss of sensation or consciousness, dizziness, slurred speech, or other symptoms that vary with the extent and severity of the damage to the brain. Also called cerebral accident, cerebrovascular accident.
1 person likes this
@gberlin (3836)
10 Jun 07
Thank you for this great information. I thought my wife was having a stroke because she had all these symptoms but fortunately it turned out to be high blood pressure. If I had waited she very likely would have had a stroke.
• Philippines
10 Jun 07
this is a vitally good information. i will surely remember to observe this procedure if i am exposed to a situation which might be a case of mild stroke. to refresh it will be to smile, raise both hands, and to speak a simple sentence. i surmise, 'i love you' will be fine. i am not joking, it just happens to be the simplest line for me to say. it is good to know that neurological experts can still do a lot of much good within three hours that the attack has taken place.
@jerryn (819)
• United States
10 Jun 07
You are so right. Thanks for posting this. I saw on the news the other day where a tool has been made to enable the doctors to suction up the blood clot in a stroke victim. I think it's awaiting approval from the FDA.