Do You Suffer From OCD?

@Malyck (3428)
Australia
August 19, 2007 10:19pm CST
Or know somebody who does? What is it that makes you/them tick? Are you receiving treatment/what are your coping strategies? How does it affect your life and relationships?
1 person likes this
4 responses
• United States
24 Sep 07
I suffer from OCD. I don't understand my illness. I often tell my husband, I don't understand, I'm a slave to it. And that's really how it feels. A huge component of my particular case is the fear of germs and toxic products. This is a bad combination because while I fear the germs, I also fear the products which are meant to kill bacteria. I've learned that I can only use chemicals just before I am about to shower. I usd to shower three or four times a day to do this but I currently refuse to punish myself like that so I only use product just before my shower every night. I wish my hands frequently, sometimes three times in a row. It's a terrrible fear that I feel or else I wouldn't do it. I know it is crazy. I am also a checker, counter, etc. I've been making alot of progress lately though. I do not take medication but have found great relief by talking to normal people. I simply ask ya know, do you do this or would you do this if that happened? And if they say no, I feel better, more like, ok I can do this and be okay. I've also just made myself do things I didn't want to do or more specifically not do things. For instance, the other day dirty dishwater splashed on my leg, normally this would have resulted in a shower but instead I wiped it with plain water and got busy so I wouldn't think about it. Now it's happened since and it was no big deal just to wipe it and go. The more you expose yourself to your fears, the more they aren't fears anymore. And I think this sort of thing works far better than medicine ever could. It will be a lifelong battle, I don't pretend otherwise but I am learning ways to cope and I hope everyone else can to.
@Malyck (3428)
• Australia
24 Sep 07
Congratulations on your progress thus far. Those small steps to conquer the fears and phobias are definitely in the right direction, and it sounds to me like you've got the right attitude to get your life in a semi-fearless order. =D I have to agree with you that hands-on coping mechanisms are far better than medication. You're learning how to battle the illness rather than just being sedated. Thank you so much for your response. I wish you and your husband the best of luck, and hope that you continue to approve in leaps and bounds. You certainly deserve the best response! Malyck. (oh, and welcome to MyLot! =D)
• United States
31 Oct 07
Sometimes when i've leaving my house, even after i've locked the door and got in my car. I'll have to go back in just to make sure i didnt leave anything on.
@BuffMom (2212)
• United States
23 Dec 07
I know someone who is exactly like that. It hurts me just watching him go through that, having to double check everything and count things for no reason. For me it's weird, I don't understand why he does that, but he does.
@Rollo1 (16639)
• Boston, Massachusetts
20 Aug 07
I am one of those people with a mild offshoot of OCD. I'm a checker. I get ready to leave the house and often turn around at the door to go back and check that I turned this off or set the other thing or whatever it is. Sometimes I get as far as the car. A few times I even drove all the way home from work to check on the coffee pot. I put the kids to bed and lock the doors but just as I am about to fall asleep, I wake up and go check the doors again. I used to stop and imprint in my memory when I unplugged the coffee pot to try to cut down on those return trips. For a while I had a pot with auto-shutoff. That was heaven because it didn't matter if I didn't turn it off. That broke and my cheapie replacement doesn't have that feature. So, instead I got married and my husband is home during the day. I figure, if the house catches fire, he'll probably notice.
@Rollo1 (16639)
• Boston, Massachusetts
20 Aug 07
I think everybody has certain compulsive behaviors - well, everyone except my husband. He is so laid back and calm, which makes him my perfect partner because only one of us is always in a panic and one of us is there to be steady and stalwart. I confess to having tried to use peoples' OCD tendencies against them. When my friend and I went shopping, if the mall was very crowded and we wanted people to leave, we would walk through the crowds muttering "I think I left the coffee pot going" "I don't think I shut the oven off" and even "I think I am hungry, I should go make dinner". I can't say scientifically that it works, but the crowd did seem to thin out a bit after we did that.
@Malyck (3428)
• Australia
20 Aug 07
I agree, every body has their own idiosyncrasies and compulsions, I suppose that 'healthy' people just know how to cope with them, and they don't control every moment of their life. Sounds like you and your hubby certainly are the perfect balancing match!
@Tinanina (13)
• United States
6 Nov 07
My Husband has severe OCD which he was diagnosed with 16 years ago after our first child was born. the last five years have been the worst as he is worse than he has ever been and none of the meds seem to work anymore so now they keep changing them adn trying new ones. He had a sort of breakdown when hsi best friend was killed in a car accident. thsi disease had destroyed our relationship adn almost sdestroyed our marriage. If I wasn't so stubborn, I would have probaly left him years ago, but I still want him to get better and get back my old husband if I can. It is very frustrating to see someone you love suffer so much.
@bucketkid (239)
• Australia
20 Aug 07
I am a meticulous clean-freak, but other than that, I don't have any other real compulsions.