Does any one know how to stop email spoofers

United States
November 16, 2007 2:24am CST
I am sick and tired of this, i have ran virus scanners, spybots and nothing is ever found, but yet i keep getting returned mails i didnt send, literally 1000's of them. I don't want to close my email account. Please help if you can.
1 person likes this
1 response
@santuccie (3383)
• United States
16 Nov 07
Ouch! I really don't think you can. Your machine doesn't have to be infected in order for criminals to spoof your e-mail address. I could spoof your e-mail address if I knew what it was (and if I had the stomach for that kind of stuff). All one has to do is use an "alias." If you're getting THAT many bounces, your e-mail account is no longer your own. You have no choice but to move, and use some discretion this time around: Don't post your e-mail address in forums or other online communities; use a web rating tool like McAfee SiteAdvisor, and don't submit your real/primary e-mail address on any site that does not have a green rating; when you get an e-mail with an attachment, download it to your desktop (do not open it yet, even if it's from someone you know), then scan it at virustotal.com. If I may make another suggestion, stay away from Yahoo! Mail. They've rested on their laurels for far too long. People still think they're the best because they're one of the oldest, when they don't even offer POP3/SMTP access, customizable filters, forwarding/fetching, or even a competent spam filter. I suggest you try Gmail, AOL, or Bluebottle. Gmail has lots of features, including POP3/SMTP (also IMAP for some members), session encryption, customizable filters, and fetching/forwarding. AOL offers IMAP/POP3/SMTP, session encryption, and whitelisting (not enabled by default, must be turned on). Bluebottle offers POP3/SMTP for free customers, session encryption, and Challenge-Response filtering. It keeps both a whitelist and a blacklist. You can manually allow any sender you want to receive e-mails from, and block anyone who starts to bug you. And when an unknown sender sends you a message, it is quarantined until: 1) They respond to a challenge from Bluebottle, verifying they are human. 2) You add them to your whitelist. Data mining should be tougher than it used to be, assuming e-mail providers have patched up previously exploited vulnerabilities in their databases. But you can still be mined if someone hijacks a cookie on your machine. If you're having problems keeping your computer secure, I suggest you visit my blog: http://invincible-windows.blogspot.com/ Hope this helps!
• United States
16 Nov 07
wow, thanks so much for your rapid response! I have reported these emails to the FBI, they have a special reporting link for that, also to my isp. I don't download attachments, my online business is attached to my primary account so i really dont want to move, but eventually i know i will have to. Thanks i will try bluebottle!
1 person likes this
@santuccie (3383)
• United States
16 Nov 07
Who is your e-mail provider?
• United States
16 Nov 07
my cable company cox.net
1 person likes this