Lets have a Demonstration about the cost of Fuel!!

@jennybianca (12913)
Australia
December 13, 2007 11:14pm CST
We should all participate in a demonstration. I wish some aussies in adelaide would organise something, as I would be in it. For city people, who do not have access to great public transport, we have no choice but to use our cars. To take my daughter to swimming 5 or 6 times a week, school 5 times each week, horse riding once per fortnight, is costing so much. Just doing those trips costs me around $50.00 each week. Yesterday petrol was $1.44 per litre.
1 person likes this
5 responses
@dodoguy (1294)
• Australia
10 Jan 08
Hi jennybianca, The question that I have about demonstrating is - why? I agree that the price of petrol is getting a bit much to bear, but there's unfortunately not a lot that can be done about it. I can't see a demonstration having much effect on anything beyond amusing the media and otherwise using up people's time which could be better spent on other things. The petrol companies don't care - they enjoy putting the prices up, and the occasional outburst of commuter frustration probably amuses them even more. Rather than organizing a demonstration to parade around with placards or whatever in the vain hope that petrol prices will go down instead of up, it might be more constructive to pool resources to find an ALTERNATIVE to the petrol trap we've all found ourselves in. Lower fuel consumption helps, but ZERO fuel consumption would be even better. And an electric vehicle (for example) might accomplish that purpose, if recharged off the (much cheaper) domestic mains, or even recharged from solar power. Or running wood-gas generators in trailers towed behind cars might be viable - like was done in Exercise WWII. But those are just examples. There's a world of possibilities out there, but it's not someone else's problem to make it all happen - because it simply won't happen. It's our problem, and a demonstration won't fix it. Organized planning and action to do something about it just might.
1 person likes this
@dodoguy (1294)
• Australia
10 Jan 08
Just by the way, I wasn't trying to be cynical there. As the posts from India and elsewhere indicate, the oil prices are a global problem - that's what happens when we have oil-based economies dancing to the tune of global energy cartels. The idea of seeking alternatives to oil isn't that far-fetched, either. Here in Australia, we have 60% of the world's known uranium reserves in the ground, and we're busily selling the stuff off to other countries, but have no domestic nuclear power industry at all. I'd imagine that a bunch of nuke power plants to provide abundant cheap electricity for generations to come would provide a solid platform to build an electrically driven economy - eg, battery powered vehicles for a start. Even without nuke power plants, electric vehicles still offer much cheaper running costs than petrol-driven versions. BUT a lot of work and commitment would be required on a national level to get such things in train. Even simple things, like bicycle thoroughfares through the cities, have been sorely neglected in Australia. This after a couple hundred years. So we're in a situation of our own making - and will continue to be, until we actually do something about it and fix the problems. It's instructive that Brazil's thriving ethanol industry only came into existence under the direction of a military dictatorship. Now it's a credit to Brazil, and the envy of the world - but it would most likely never have come into being if not commanded by a dictatorship in the first place - a democracy ALWAYS chooses the EASY way out, from the most SHORT TERM perspective possible. So maybe we need a nice, healthy, totalitarian regime to take power here in Australia in order to squash all the noisy feel-good opposition and actually get something useful done about the price of energy.
1 person likes this
@jennybianca (12913)
• Australia
10 Jan 08
I agree with many of your ideas here. My suggestion of a protest was not meant to exclude positive methods of reducing the fuel costs and preferably our reliance on them. I still believe a protest, of the peaceful kind, is a legitmate way to let the government know that we, the people, are serious. Even if no action is taking at the time, which is the likely case, it impresses upon the oil companies & government that the population has real concerns.
@Calais (10899)
• Australia
14 Dec 07
We dont have public transport here and the petrol is at the very least $1.45, I dread to see what it will be coming up to christmas.. Just to go to town costs a small fortune..Its ridiculous..Needless to say we try not to go often and we dont ride the bikes as much ...
1 person likes this
@jennybianca (12913)
• Australia
14 Dec 07
Some of petrol companies deliberately raise costs just before holidays start. It makes going on holidays so difficult for people.
@Calais (10899)
• Australia
14 Dec 07
Our petrol is always expensive, I think because they add extra freight to the trucks that bring the petrol out..
1 person likes this
• India
25 Dec 07
Hi jenny, $50 a week, works out to be approximately 34 litres of petrol. I feel it is fairly a high bit of Consumption. Probably you have to avoid cars when you are to take short trips. Regarding the pricing of Petrol it is priced Rs 48/= in my town in India.Converting it into US dollars it works out to be 1.23 per litre. So by no means fuel is cheap anywhere in the world. Only thing we have to do is to find the alternate source of energy, that will sustain in market for a longer term. If this happens i feel, that many WARS fought under various veils will certainly end, and the world will be lot more happier. Merry Christmas to you Jenny. Take care friend:)
1 person likes this
@jennybianca (12913)
• Australia
27 Dec 07
Yes, you have made a good point, that wars may end if an alternative fuel was developed.
@Mickie30 (2631)
24 Dec 07
Travelling at the same speed can help fuel economy there are also other steps you can take. You need to drive sensibly. Speeding, rapid acceleration and braking wastes gas. Using cruise control can cut down on fuel usage. You can limit the amount of idling this does the car no good. Try to reduce the amount you drive. Maintain your vehicle. Reduce the weight you carry in your car. I have heard about PT Cruisers. There are ways of reducing the amount of money you have to spend on fuel.
1 person likes this
@jennybianca (12913)
• Australia
25 Dec 07
These are all excellent suggestions. Thank you.
@KarenO52 (2951)
• United States
16 Dec 07
It's scary to see how much the price per gallon of gas is going up. I live in a rural area, where I have to drive 10 miles just to get basic groceries. My husband drives 25 miles to work everyday. He's started to use my car more now, as it saves a few dollars every day driving that than driving his van. Sometimes I wish I still lived in Chicago, where there's a great transit system. I knew many people who never learned how to drive, and got by fine by bus, train, or bicycle.
1 person likes this
@jennybianca (12913)
• Australia
17 Dec 07
I have been to bigger cities, usually overseas that have an excellent public transport system. Australia is so big, with a small population, that it simply can't produce a really good public system. Thus, nearly all of us, still reply on cars a lot. And with the price of petrol, it is becoming very difficult.