Black Hole Plasma Jet

@theprogamer (10539)
United States
December 27, 2007 10:40pm CST
I'm a bit late on this one and forgot to post it earlier, but hey, better late than never. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071218103611.htm Somewhat interesting in terms of science. I expected superheated gases would be involved when I first saw the story. Apparently a black hole is expelling hot gases from the center of a nearby galaxy. Now the galaxies involved have a history of hot gases, plasma and matter composition. This is touches on some of the theories to the creation of the universe and pre-universal existence (heated gases/plasmas). Physically galaxies are theorized to have large black holes at their centers and are rotating clockwise as indicated by the formation of the jet. Intriguing.
2 people like this
3 responses
@skinnychick (6906)
• United States
28 Dec 07
Very interesting- says a lot about creation actually and maybe life or the ability to be life in other galaxies far away. I wish the article was a little more in depth- :( Another good story thanks for sharing it- pro.
@theprogamer (10539)
• United States
28 Dec 07
Be careful what you wish for Skinnychick... I may just put more articles and postings from now on :) I can always add even more analysis on things too... but of course I run the risk of scaring some readers away. Ah well. :
1 person likes this
@theprogamer (10539)
• United States
8 Jun 08
After spending time on again - off again trying to resolve discussions in the past couple of days I think my previous statement still holds true. Not too many are interested in the science topics. Doesn't mean I won't stop sharing them though.
• United States
9 Jun 08
Noooooooo- don't stop sharing them. We are out here and like the science topics. It's good to think once in awhile. :)
@munhozmib (3851)
• Sao Paulo, Brazil
28 Dec 07
Hello. I found the article very interesting. If we start to invest more on this kind of research, we can get the answer to many questions. Just a shame that the article does not give much details. Thanks for sharing it with us!
2 people like this
@theprogamer (10539)
• United States
28 Dec 07
Well some of the article has established theory in it which can be searched further with other articles. I'm tempted to add much more into my side of the posting too (along with multiple articles perhaps). Very tempted Munho, and I'm glad you too brought it to my attention.
2 people like this
@munhozmib (3851)
• Sao Paulo, Brazil
29 Dec 07
Hm, I understand what you mean. And I'm also glad I could bring it to your attention. I look forward to answer more of your discussions. Respectfully.
@VKXY62 (1606)
• Australia
28 Dec 07
G'day theprogamer, now that was a beaut article. I've seen the pics of the galaxies with the jets from the central object before, but the jet hitting the other galaxy, hoooeee. Have you seen the image of the quasar yet? I can't remember if it was a Hubble or Spitzer telescope image. They imaged a quasar and discovered it had a normal galaxy wrapped around it. I put forward a theory that the quasar may be a black hole composed of antimatter, you know when the big bang happened, there were supposed to be equal amounts of matter and mirror matter. There must be some around somewhere. I really can't think of any other reason as to why a galactic central object could be so bright. K. P.S. you seem to be into space and bits, have a gig at this, (I made it), http://www.qsl.net/vk3ukf/index.html and my Martian MER software at, http://www.qsl.net/vk3ukf/Merdat2007.html Cheers mate.
@VKXY62 (1606)
• Australia
28 Dec 07
Another P.S. What's this about galaxies rotating in a clockwise direction? There is no up or down in space and it depends on your position and perspective. I thought. Please explain.
@theprogamer (10539)
• United States
29 Dec 07
Very good point on the latter part. I think I read it was clockwise but with space any perspective is correct. It could be from our "perspective" but I'll have to look into the real definition of the directional observation. The rotation itself stems from celestial/body movement along with the theorized super blackholes located at the center of galaxies. I'd put it similar to the orbit of a solar system and star just for an example to grasp. On quasars, I've heard of the theory and I've seen various images. Spectacular in my view. I'll also have to check into your views. I too wonder if where the opposite matter and energy "went". Also I've theorized in another discussion the universe may be surrounded by the "pre-universal" material. I'm also checking out your links VK, thanks for sharing.
1 person likes this