Trouble re-adjusting...help!

United States
January 13, 2008 12:56pm CST
My son is 8 and has Asperger's. Anyone have any pointers to help him get back into his schedule? At Christmas he had off of school for 10 days and then had the flu for a week after that. Now he can't seem to get back in the swing of things and is making himself physically sick! I could sure use some pointers from those of you who have an AS kiddo!
1 person likes this
2 responses
@mclendon (308)
• United States
5 Jun 08
I realize you wrote this 5 months ago, but in case you are struggling when there is a change in routine, I thought I would try to help you out. Does he have a calendar? A large planning calendar where you can write out his schedule or use pictures or stickers may help him to feel like he is back in control of his schedule. If he is into numbers you might try making a numbered, ordered list of his morning routine and post it somewhere so he can use it as a checklist. Go over it with him the night before or several times over the weekend. Make a new list for holidays or summer break. Go over it with him; for ex: "This is your school morning schedule. You can refer to it to check off each thing you need to do in the morning. You won't have to worry about being late or forgetting something if you use your list." I think the scheduling thing is a way to feel in control. My son is also 8 and diagnosed with PDD(NOS) but he is very Aspergery. He gets out of sorts when his schedule changes or when he doesn't know his exact schedule for the day. I've used a numbered checklist in the past and it really helped him. He has since "graduated" to using his clock and calendar to help him "control" his schedule.
@ronaldinu (12439)
• Malta
20 Sep 08
Children with Aspergers like routine and a well planned schedule. They have difficulty to cope with things that are not unusual.This happens to me when my son goes back to work either after the Christmas or summer holidays. The first days are a bit difficult but then he manages to cope quite well. Try to be as supportive as you can, with your physical presence and reassurance.