Adults reading children's books.

United States
March 1, 2008 10:21am CST
There are some books, apparently written for children, which adults can read and still enjoy. One example would have been "The Hobbit" which I believe was intended to be read by a younger audience. Another, more recent, example would be "Harry Potter." I check out books each week from the library to read to my daughter. Some don't interest me at all. Others, if I adopt a simplistic child's mindset to read the story, seem entertaining. One example would be the book, "Chopsticks" which is a really simple story -- but which was enjoyable enough to read to my daughter. Another example would be "The Eye of the Unicorn" which my daughter and I read together, each of us happening to enjoy the story from our own perspective. Now, of course, my daughter if only four -- so I can't read her Harry Potter or The Hobbit yet. But my question is.. what stories have you read to and with your child which you -- as an adult -- also found yourself enjoying? Why did you enjoy them? What do you think was different about that story instead of others which made it more captivating?
8 people like this
20 responses
@lilybug (21145)
• United States
1 Mar 08
My son is 8 and is always bringing books home from school to read. I have noticed that some of them are books that I also had when I was a kid. I enjoy sitting there listening to the story as he is reading it and remembering it from my child hood. It is a nice flash back. I recently paid a visit to the home that I grew up in and got some of my old books out of the attic. My son read one of them to me the other night. It is called "Morris Has a Cold". I love that book.
2 people like this
• United States
6 Mar 08
Ah! Morris the Moose and Boris the Bear, right! I think I remember that one.
@lilybug (21145)
• United States
8 Mar 08
I also got him a different Morris and Boris book last week off bookmooch. It is called Morris and Boris Three Stories. It has, what is obvious by the title, 3 stores that are about 20 pages each.
@Angelwriter (1955)
• United States
1 Mar 08
I read children's books for myself. I don't have any kids, but I've never stopped loving those kinds of books. I find them generally more enjoyable than adult books, because most of them get to the story right away, and don't have pages of exposition and description. One book I love is The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle by Avi. I wouldn't call it simplistic. It's about a 13 year old girl who's tried and convicted of murder while at sea. It's exciting and suspenseful - probably more because the main character is a kid than it would have been with an adult. And, even the ones that are a little slower to get to the action seem filled with more possibilities, because the characters are young and haven't had time to become as jaded as adults. A Little Princess could never be written for adults. But, it's a magical book.
2 people like this
• United States
6 Mar 08
:) My daughter is a bit young for stories about accusations of murder, I think. But I can see how in a few years she might be more interested in it. Then again, I can read science and discovery type books to her and she has fun with them. Maybe I'm not giving her enough credit there. I can see the point about simplicity and more innocent characters, too.
@ersmommy1 (12596)
• United States
1 Mar 08
I read all sorts of books to my daughter. Fairy stories and Curious george. What matters to me is that SHE find the stories interesting. What (to use your term) captivates me is seeing her. How she interprets the story. For example My child has a Rumplestilskin book that I read to her frequently. But she also has a CD with a different version of the story on it.What i find entertaining is when she Points out" But mommy the other reader in the other story said..." shows me she is interested and paying close attention.
2 people like this
• United States
6 Mar 08
Ok, that is endearing. She understands there are different versions of a story.
• Philippines
2 Mar 08
I love children's books, I love reading them to my nephews and nieces because I also learn from them as well as get the chance to read the books I have not read when I was young.
2 people like this
@ElicBxn (61135)
• United States
2 Mar 08
I shamelessly read children's books, where am I going to find an "adult's" horse book after all? I also read lots of other books targeted to children. However, I do protest that The Hobbit was writen for children, even "young adults" (13-17.) I read it during that time frame back in the 60's. I can honestly say that there were things that I didn't understand. I reread it in my early 20's before I read the Trilogy and got a more indepth understanding of what Tolkin was going for. The Hobbit is really a prequel to the Trilogy and while it may not be as violent or as complex as the Trilogy, it is still a complex book. Just so you know, I'm a die hard science fiction/fantasy fan, I'm also in my mid-50's.
1 person likes this
• United States
6 Mar 08
I read the Hobbit in Junior High. It seemed to follow it at the time. In fact, I read the whole series one after the other. I would guess that I probably didn't know all the words, either. I most likely just skipped those parts. Then again, Tolkien as a linguist, so a large vocabulary and words in his invented languages would probably have been confusing for young children, too.
1 person likes this
@ElicBxn (61135)
• United States
7 Mar 08
My brother read it in jr high too. I can tell you that he didn't understand it, tho he acted like he did. I'm sure he THOUGHT he did.
• United States
1 Mar 08
At 29, I guess I'm still a kid at heart, because everytime I go to the book store, I find myself skimming through children's book. My ultimate favorite would have to be "the giving tree." I find that story really beautifully sad and true in every person's life. I also love reading the works of RL Stine. He is like the Stephen King for children. When I read these children books, I go back in time where I am still a little girl, living with Mom, feeling protected and sheltered, and worry free. These books makes me feel young again.
1 person likes this
• United States
6 Mar 08
Oh, wow. I rather thought the giving tree was a bit.. well, overly giving. But, I guess, in many ways that's a sort of symbolism for parents, isn't it. I should read it again.
@kimbers867 (2540)
• United States
3 Mar 08
The Berenstain Bears are a staple in our house. I think each book teaches a lesson. They are wonderful. If I happen to have extra time during the day, I substitute teach, I always grab Berestain Bears to read to the younger kids. My 6 year old and I have been reading the Fairy Books from Disney, since she is a huge Tink fan. They are really cute and give you a lot of background info on her. My oldest and I tried to read Harry Potter but couldn't get into them, but we liked the movies. She and I did read the Wonky Witch books, there are two right now and the third is in progress. They were good.
@hbalmer (11)
• Canada
2 Mar 08
First, let me tell you that the Hobbit was actually written for adults and eventually worked its way down to the teenage and now the preteen set. It is an amazing book that allows each person, of each age group and reading experience, the opportunity to discover something that they did not discover on a previous read-through. The Harry Potter series of course was written by a woman who was smart enough to pick up on a secret that many writers forget - parents have to sit through this too. I don't have children of my own, but enjoy reading several books for nephews and to other people's children. A few of my favourites (I'm Canadian so this is spelled correctly) from the ages include, but are not limited to: The Secret Garden, Little Women, Little Men, Anne of Green Gables and the series which follows, and the Witch and the Wardrobe. For those adults out there that want to read these books but feel that they can't or shouldn't because they don't have kids; please get this idea out of your head. Words are written for a world to enjoy and being taken back to a simpler time is a great gift that we should all be able to give ourselves.
@merjun (158)
• Philippines
2 Mar 08
is fun and nice to feel like a child once and a while
1 person likes this
@mcrowl (1050)
• New Zealand
2 Mar 08
I've read Madeleine L'Engle's books, Neil Gaiman's children's books (and his adult ones), books like the Anastasia series, and heaps of others. I don't have any problem enjoying children's books - in fact sometimes I enjoy them more than the ones written for adults!
@djmarion (4901)
• Philippines
2 Mar 08
i like reading books and i tend to buy different books in the bookstore near my place, sometimes i even go out for the book sale and buy some use yet great books to add for my collection. reading i one thing i fancy the most and during the time when i have no computer yet in my home i tend to read a lot of books, the best i read is the books of Dan Brown. As for the children books i don't read too much of it. i read Harry Potter though since the story is very entertaining and i believe it is not intended for children only.
1 person likes this
@moneyandgc (3430)
• United States
2 Mar 08
Some of my favorite books are "children's" books. I love the Harry Potter series. Homecoming by Cynthia Voigt, The first book in The Boxcar Children series. My husband loves the Artemis Fowl books, Eragon and Eldest, Harry Potter, and the Narnia series (I have only read The Lion The Witch and The Wardrobe).
1 person likes this
@preve1984 (610)
1 Mar 08
I'm 23 years old and just a short time ago I have read "The Hobbit", is really beautiful and I believe that all people should read it. Events would like to read "Pinocchio" I believe children's books are funny and also very constructive.
1 person likes this
@mflower2053 (3227)
• United States
1 Mar 08
I like reading younger childrens book. I want to read the spiderwick chronicles. I read The Chronicles of Narnia which was pretty good and I try and read it to my daughters even if they don't understand it yet.
1 person likes this
• India
1 Mar 08
there is no bad in reading child's book ..i ll read all comics and i love it ......hehehe
1 person likes this
• Philippines
1 Mar 08
i have always loved reading. i grew up to Fairy Tales when i was in elementary, then when i was in high school, i read teenage fiction like Goosebumps, Sweet Valley, Fear Street and Christopher Pike and some Edgar Allan Poe's shorts, then when i was in college, i was introduced to stories of deeper meaning like those literary pieces of Nick Joaquin like the May Day Eve (which is my all time fave), and Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy which is entertaining at the same time scary. and now, im already a yuppie, i'm still fond of books and i'm reading inspirational books like the Negosyo by Joey Concepcion, it's about how businessmen and tycoons made it big.
@Shawchert (1040)
• United States
1 Mar 08
I tend to read a lot of younger books, mostly because the Adult fantasy is well... too perplexing for my tiny little brain. As for reading to my son, I read him picture books, he is only 2 months old i could read him anything and he will be happy with the sound of my voice, but I like some of the stories that i find in the library.
1 person likes this
@BYOLA2871 (4373)
• South Africa
2 Mar 08
i guess am guilty of this but i am not worried cos there iare lots of things you learn from these books though they were meant for kids,i also love to watch children cartoons,i still read comics,it helps me know how well to relate to my kids bringing me to their level,we do read together sometimes and i am really having fun doing this
@kblakley (248)
• Loveland, Ohio
2 Mar 08
I've actually read alot of books/books series meant for younger readers. I've read all the Harry Potter books, which I have a 12yr old that read them too and it actually helped us connect. When they get that age you look for anyway to connect with them. We've also read the Goosebump series books together. I'm a sucker for thrillers and there just so simple but suspenseful. We've also read The Sisterhood of the traveling pants. Although I really enjoy alot of the young readers books I still sometimes like to sit and read a good adult novel. I think the one thing that got me reading younger readers books is my daughter, she seemed to like them so much and I thought what the heck......if she likes them I'd like to check it out too. I don't regret it at all, infact its probably one of the best things I ever did.
@Pose123 (21661)
• Canada
2 Mar 08
Hi owatagoosiam, I know many adults who enjoy the books that you mentioned, but they no longer hold any interest for me. I think that all parents should read to their children, as it creates a bond between parent and child as well as introducing children to books. Blessings.