can structure reduce juvenile delinquency?

@winterose (39893)
Canada
March 24, 2008 4:17am CST
my grandmother always said, Idle handles get into trouble, for years authorities believed that activities such as sports, community service etc reduced juvenile delinquency a new study seems to back it up http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/03/080321174211.htm do you believe this to be true, have you ever had a juvenile delinquent child, a child that has been in trouble with the law? If so how did you deal with it?
5 responses
@udnisak (610)
• Australia
18 Aug 10
i belive there are lots of problems for this type of behaviour in youth... main problem comes withing their family,, if a family memeber is a criminal they tend to get influence from that and start commiting crime.. this family member can be your own father or mother or even one of your siblings... i belive high parental supervision is the key to this problem...
@winterose (39893)
• Canada
19 Aug 10
wow this is an old discussion, it was posted three years ago, just parenting styles are implicated in juvenile delinquency, the permissive parenting style is the one most responsible,
• Canada
2 Nov 08
As far as deliquency goes, it's usually just rebellion against parental units so far as I see. Kids from close families don't get into trouble nearly so often as those who dislike their parents.
1 person likes this
@winterose (39893)
• Canada
3 Nov 08
yes there is some research supporting that
@crazynurse (7489)
• United States
24 Mar 08
Your grandmother was a very, very wise woman! While I have not had a child who was a juvenile deliquent, I have worked with my fair share of children who were juvenile deliquents. I worked for six years on an in-patient ward of a child/ adoescent mental healh facility. We got children there who were really troubled and kept them for 6 months in an attempt to turn them around. Sadly, these kids were often the product of poor parenting or a complete lack of parenting. Sometimes it was do to chemical imbalances in their brains and other times we didn't know the cause. No matter the cause, each of our psychologists and therapists would recommend the same thing to whomever the child was being discharged to, "keep them involved." They recommended that younger children be enrolled in karate classes, dance classes, organized sports teams and anything else to give them a focus and to build self-esteem.
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@winterose (39893)
• Canada
25 Mar 08
very good response, yes all those things are good, including peer pressure,
@KrisNY (7591)
• United States
25 Mar 08
You know, I believe this as well. That when kids have something structured to do—it keeps them out of trouble. It’s when kids have nothing to do- and no adult supervision that they go out and look for something to do and end up finding trouble. My daughter is 11—and she is a great kid. We live in a small town- I would also think that this probably happens more in bigger cities—where there are more kids- with less adult supervision. .
@ElicBxn (61143)
• United States
24 Mar 08
I have a friend who has a son who's been a budding delinquent since he was a baby. Despite everything they tried with him they failed. I don't think everyone is wire to be good (per you other discussion) but this one was definately wired to be bad.
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