Mind Over Matter

United States
May 29, 2008 12:38pm CST
Is this an effective approach to fibro pain? My doc explain the disease as a miscomunication between your nerves and your brain. If I hurt myself...say stub my toe, and it hurts way more than it should, could this be a result of the disease? And if so, can I think my way out of the pain?
2 people like this
6 responses
@patgalca (15636)
• Orangeville, Ontario
3 Jun 08
Fibro is neurological but not in that way. It is more a sensitivity of all the senses. You are going to be more sensitive pain, your stomach is probably more sensitive to certain foods, your eyes are probably more sensitive to light and you could be seeing floaters, your sense of smell is probably heightened, you probably can't stand loud noises and may even have constant ringing in the ears. And obviously you are sensitive to touch, hence pain. I know people who can't have a massage therapist touch them because their skin hurts. I like my massage therapist to work through the pain in my muscles. It hurts but the muscles need to be loosened up. Stress causes all your senses to react. If there was one simple answer in the brain to this illness then you would think they would be able to fix it. But diet, the weather, stress, they all play a role. How can miscommunication of the nerves in your brain be the main factor? Mag-Citrate (Magnesium/Malic Acid) helps relieve pain but I don't think it adjusts the brains nerves. I have had fibro for 11 years and it is not easy in the beginning but if you do your research and you become proactive, learn your limitations, pace yourself, exercise, eat well and drink lots of water, you can manage your illness. Don't let it manage you. Don't let it stop you from doing what you want to do. You main pay for it in the end but what you do is probably worth it. We had relatives with us this weekend and after two days I was wiped right out. So tired, so much pain, but I had a grand time. I didn't go to the dance because I knew I could not handle the loud music and it would be a late night. Besides, hanging out with a bunch of drunks is not fun for me so I stayed home and had a good night's sleep. My husband agreed that it was too loud for me. Many doctors will tell you many different stories. The fact is, no one knows what causes fibro, no one knows how to cure it. So anything they say is just their opinion or theory. Do your own research and find something that makes sense to you. Good luck!
2 people like this
@kareng (20734)
• United States
9 Jun 08
Well said Pat! The main thing is to learn your limits and stick within them. I have found that I need to stay somewhat active or else I get worse. I try to stretch as much as I can and get in regular exercise. I have managed to get off my medication by keeping steady with what I'm doing. I used to be on medication and had a hard time sleeping because of the pain. Now, I'm sleeping good and not waking up in the middle of the night unless it is to go to the bathroom. Before I slept very badly, tossed and turned and then had a hard time getting up the next morning to go to work. I've resolved to fight it with everything I have. Diet and exercise are important. My goal right now is to eat better and lose some weight. Don't let them put you on too much medication to where you can't think straight.
• United States
10 Jun 08
Thanks Pat and KAren. The "knowing your limits" part you both mentioned is something I am working on right now. I don't want this to control my life. It is good to know that I finally have a doctor who doesn't make me feel crazy. I have been fighting this for about 8 years, and just recently(in the last three months) have found a doc who is willing to look past my already diagnosed conditions. So over the past three months I have been keeping a journal. I can go back and look over the things that really put me out. I can then work to adjust how often I do those things, or to what extent I do them. One thing I'm doing is giving myself regular breaks,. Instead of tackling the whole house at once, I focus one thing for about 20-40 minutes, then give myself a break. This break helps me to keep track(or rather monitor) where I am at and how much more I will be able to do. Thanks again for both of your comments. People such as yourselves are giving me hope!!
@sunkissed (4331)
• United States
29 May 08
Well your doctor can say what he wants. I have never been able to think my way out of pain. I have been disabled for over 22 year because of degerative disc disease. I have had 4 back surgurys for ruptured discs.I have nerve root damage to all the siatic nerves in my legs. I can not walk long, sit or stand long. I have cronic pain 24/7 i take neurontin,cymbalta,muscle relaxers, pain pills,do all sorts of things for pain, nothing helps.I have tried telling myself it did not hurt, it sure did not work for me..
1 person likes this
• United States
30 May 08
It sounds as though your situation is much worse than mine. Thank you for sharing. Just to clarify, my doc never told me I could think my way out of pain. She just expalined what fibromyalgia is, and I was thinking, since its a miscommunicaation to and from the brain, that maybe thinking out of pain is a possible therepy for fibro suferrers.
1 person likes this
• United States
5 Jun 08
I was diagnosed with Fibro in 1999. I have often wondered the same thing, but no I don't think you can think your way out of pain. I have terrible trouble with my Fibro and have not been able to get it under control. It seems as I get older, the pain and fatigue are getting worse. If I could think my pain away I would probably be meditating 24/7...lol, anything that would help.
• United States
5 Jun 08
It was a thought at least:) I truly believe in the power of ones mind. After I posted this I tried it out for a while. I had waked my ankle bone with a scooter(after taking it away from my son). It ached so bad I thought it was broken. But everyonce in a while, when I'd stopped thinking about it, it didn't hurt. So I thought, maybe my brain was getting a mixed signal, and it really wasn't as bad as it felt. Well, this was days ago, and it is still bothering me when I set it wrong, or bump it again...so I guess it was just wishful thinking:)
• United States
20 Jul 08
Hey, I was recently diagnosed w/ fibro. OMG....I used to be so active...now there are days when I feel 52 going on 92! Thinking your way out of this? nope...it just plain hurts. I just had 2 very bad days...following about 3 hrs in my flower gardens. You sometimes have to wonder if it is worth it!!! At least I can work 40 hr weeks again...it has been a long 2 yrs getting a diagnosis!!! I agree w/ everyone else...you have to learn moderation. But, damn it is tough. My doc told me to read, read, read,...the more different things you try...the better your odds of finding what works for you... hope I find it soon!!!LOL!! God bless you love...hang in there!
@bam001 (941)
• United States
17 Jul 08
I don't think that most doctors truly understand this disease (or syndrome as they call it) and how it affects us physically and mentally. I have never been able to think my pain away. I do think that I have misfiring pain signal and therefore hurt more than the normal person.
• United States
1 Jun 08
It might be a bit more complicated than that. Here's a question - have you ever tried yoga? Now don't let me act like I know anything about it, because I'm only experimenting with it myself, but my partner is completely into yoga and she swears up and down that it is nearly the cure for everything. She started yoga several years ago after a shoulder injury was giving her a lot of continual pain. She swears by it. I'm trying to get into it myself, slowly but surely. I can feel a difference with it (when I *do* it) And it isn't really about twisting yourself up into a pretzel shape or anything - if you do something and it *hurts* don't do it! http://www.yoga.net.au/what_is_yoga http://yoga.about.com/od/beginningyoga/a/whatisyoga.htm But I think this is probably a more involved way of looking at the "mind over matter" issue. It's not simply thinking your way out of pain, but rather attuning your body and your mind to where you are more mentally attuned to whats happening physically. And whats neat is, there is yoga for EVERYTHING that ails you, just look it up, "yoga for _____" However, I'm still trying to find "yoga for round bodies" lol. (although, it IS out there!). peace - and good luck.