Foreclosures

United States
September 7, 2008 1:12pm CST
Not long ago, several people in this area were sentenced to prison for defrauding people, causing their homes to go into foreclosure. OK, so they're not doing that anymore, but others are. There should be a way to help people who've been defrauded so that they wouldn't have to lose their homes or their credit ratings. This doesn't mean people who are just not careful those who spend more than they can afford, but people who are victims of fraud. Putting the evildoers in jail doesn't help them at all! How can we all help them?
3 people like this
6 responses
• United States
7 Sep 08
You have another good discussion here. I have to agree. I think that if someone gets Arrested and convicted! Then the name of the innocent should be cleared, and the credit rating restored. It was not their fault. Restore their credit rating and let them pay back what they ower over like a 24 month period. Sure beats losing their home, their credit rating,( which would make it very hard to get another home )and blemish their good name. Public humilation for the innocent has got to be change for sure!
• United States
7 Sep 08
Louise, my friend, I'm glad we "met". It's fun to have an occ disagreement, but you and I obviously think alike about many things. We ARE our brothers' (and sisters') keepers!
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Sep 08
Thank so much!
@leenie50 (3992)
• United States
7 Sep 08
Hi Cobra, It's funny you should ask. Actually there is nothing funny about this situation. There is an organization called ACORN. (Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now). here is a phone# 1-866-67-ACORN. This organization will help anyone who is struggling to hold on to their homes. It's a wonderful organization and welcomes anyone in trouble. Even if you have been careless in the past, it isn't too late to get help. No one gets judged just helped. Our economy is taking down a lot of people who have lost their jobs and can't find other jobs. My husband has been out of work for a year and a half. I'm on disability and unemployment is not what it used to be 25 years ago. We struggle every single day, trying to figure out how to keep our utilities on, how to buy food and all the other things in life that cost money. Cobra, thanks for bringing the very real situation to the forefront so that I may share this very important information. It's not just here in Florida so friends call the number. leenie
• United States
8 Sep 08
Leenie, I've missed you! I'm so sorry your situation is as sorry as mine. I told you that one of these days I'd tell you about what's so tough, and I guess this is the time. My darling husband is in prison for a crime the perpetrator admitted to, but the court said he can't get out anyway. We're fighting like crazy, but there's not a nickle to spare. I refinanced the house twice to pay for lawyers, but to no avail as yet, because the guy who admitted to it was killed committing another crime, so he can't be cross-examined. My nice new car had to be replaced by one that's 12 years old so I had no payment to make, and my retirement savings are gone. Sometimes life just stinks. Still, John and I are both optimistic that somebody will listen and help us one of these days, and we're hoping my health, poor as it is, will hold out until I'm old enough for Medicare, because nobody in their right mind would ever insure me. Then I can retire from the school system and find another job to have an income to supplement retirement income. In any case, what's happening to you and so many others is beyond horrible. A few of my friends have had to give up their computers, so we can only be in touch while they're at work. Others no longer have telephones. Several have had to stop helping their kids with college expenses, rent out rooms or move in with other family members. I want America back!
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Sep 08
By the way, thank you so much for the information about ACORN! I've already passed it along to three people in need! You're really a blessing!
@leenie50 (3992)
• United States
8 Sep 08
Cobra, I am so sorry to hear of your troubles. I have always said that there is always someone much worse off than I am and feel that complaining takes away from others who take their problems in stride. But I realize that isn't always possible. I took a few days away from mylot this past week because I have been suffering from the loss of my precious little mini dachshund (Bogie). Someone poisoned him. Both my husband and I have been in a state of shock. I got Bogie when he was 6 wks, old and weighed only 2 pounds. He would have been 9 in Dec. He got me through taking care of my second husband who suffered a terminal illness for five years before he passed. Without Bogie, I would have been so lost. He put those smiles on my face when nothing or no one could. My heart has been shattered. Today is really my first day back on mylot. I think I needed to release some of my sadness. Now back to you. Sweetie, have you gotten any help through a local legal services? These services have lawyers to help you through just about any thing. Check with your local social security office. You are a very strong person and I know somehow you will make it through all of this. I will keep you in my prayers. We'll talk more later. I will send you my email address if you like so we can further our discussions. Take Care Sweetie.xoxoxo leenie
1 person likes this
@Sam334 (125)
• Singapore
8 Sep 08
It's a very sad truth, however, there are certainly loopholes everywhere... Criminals are getting away due to these loopholes, they are getting rich using these loopholes, and have been causing people to lose their lives... Once again, it's really sad, that there is almost nothing you can do against people who make use of such loopholes... They are no different from people who play cheat by making use of glitches to gain benefits... There is no way you can help the victims... unless you are a lawyer, or a swindler. Looking back then, to enlist help from swindler means you swindle money back! While a lawyer is more towards a legal way... to sue them on court in hopes of getting a compensation... To say the truth, while these two are the best methods, the lawyer part doesn't really stand true afterall, since frauds and swindles are tricks that rarely leave behind any evidence...
1 person likes this
@Sam334 (125)
• Singapore
8 Sep 08
Oops, wrong window :P
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Sep 08
How horrible that so many are willing to live on the carrion left behind when their victims are destroyed!
@di1159 (1580)
• United States
8 Sep 08
Living the mortgage fraud capital of the United States (Miami), and working in the business, I've seen some really mind boggling schemes where people turn over their credit and/or homes. With the credit, it is a tougher situation, as many brokers offer people money (usually a minium of $1,000.00) to use their credit. When the property goes into foreclosure, the credit goes out the window. Many claim they didn't know how serious it could be, but they were willing to go along with the fraud and get the bank to lend money they never intended on repaying. With the homes its a easier, especially if the owner can establish residency and at least in Florida, judges tend to rule on the side of the homeowner. Lately, we have experienced in increase in pro bono real estate cases where an attorney is assigned a case to help the homeowner's free of charge, just payment of some court filing fees. It's the Bar's way of giving back and helping the real estate community get back on its feet.
1 person likes this
• United States
8 Sep 08
Miami's my home, too. There are 81 homes in my development, and 5 are empty while the foreclosed properties are sold or auctioned or whatever. It's great that the Bar is taking on some responsibility for helping people who overpay them most of the time!
@Chevee (5915)
• United States
7 Sep 08
Yes that does happen a lot. It is public humiliation. And they will put it in the newspaper under foreclosures, it happens here they have a section in the paper where a home is lost or foreclosed it is put in the paper. And then they auction the homes off that also in in the paper. Some people in my neighborhood lost their homes and FHA gave them a chance to get their homes back but that was years ago. Thank God I didn't have that problem and my home is now paid for it wasn't easy but I made it.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Sep 08
How fortunate! I wish I could say the same. I'm glad I owe far less than a third of the value of the house, but the mortgage payments seem to stretch on forever. I wonder what would happen if there we sort of emergency, and I couldn't make the payments, because Miami has just about the the worst real estate market anywhere. At least I haven't been defrauded, and I haven't made the payments higher than I can manage, but people have outpriced themselves, relying on a future that's been destroyed by the current economic slump. I know several people who have had to rent out part of a home, or move in with other family members, because expenses keep rising as incomes keep falling.
• United States
8 Sep 08
Depends on the situations on ourselves i guess. I mean, if someone is in a good financial position then he should do what he feels he has to do in order to help these people. Otherwise i guess emotional support is alays good.