Aperture Priority and Shutter Priority, when should I use them?

Philippines
September 9, 2008 2:57am CST
When I go shooting, I usually set my camera to Aperture priority and then just set the aperture to fit the setting I'm shooting in. In some cases, I use the manual settings to get a certain effect. I rarely use shutter priority. I was just wondering which one is better to use, aperture priority or shutter priority?
2 responses
@trickiwoo (2702)
• United States
9 Sep 08
I mostly use Program or Manual when shooting. I rarely use aperture or shutter priority. Aperture and Shutter priority modes are sort of "half manual, half auto". When you set value, the camera will pick the other to for an acceptable exposure. So if you want to use a fast shutter speed, set your camera to Shutter Priority, chose the speed you want, then the camera chooses the correct aperture for a correctly exposed photo. And when you want a specific DOF, you set your camera to Aperture Priority, chose the f-number, then the camera will select the correct shutter speed for a correctly exposed photo. Usually I let the camera select both (program), or I select both (manual). The best advice I can give is to use all four modes extensively and really get to know them. Learn which modes work best for you. You'll get to know which modes work best in which situations for your individual shooting preferences!
• Philippines
10 Sep 08
Are there certain conditions that I should use them? Or is it based on your preference?
@trickiwoo (2702)
• United States
10 Sep 08
Really it all depends on your preferences. Often camera manuals will suggest things like if you want to get a stop motion shot of a fast object like a race car or a hummingbird flapping its wings, then use shutter priority. Or if you want to shoot a landscape with everything in focus or a flower with the flower in focus and the background blurred, then use aperture priority. However, if you feel more comfortable achieving these effects by manually setting the controls then that's fine too! Or if you're happy with the result you get with the camera automatically setting both controls, that's fine too!
@oiixdaii (1059)
• Philippines
10 Sep 08
Like what trickiwoo had said, I think these settings depends on the situation. For example 1. Shutter Priority - You could use these settings if you are shooting sports and you would like to freeze the motion of the subject without blurring it. 2. Aperture Priority - You could use these if you want to control the Depth of field of the photo. Other two settings 3. Program Mode - This mode is like the auto because the camera takes care of the shutter speed and the aperture. I think you only need to adjust the ISO settings based on the light level. 4. Manual Mode - This setting is used if you have time to take test shots because in this mode you control the aperture, shutter speed, iso settings, exposure, etc. If you became interested with the Manual settings, you could take a photograph using aperture priority or shutter priority, then check the exif of the image and try to imitate it using the Manual mode.