Celebrity Support for Presidential Candidates...is it right?

United States
September 9, 2008 7:53pm CST
The Government has placed limits on Pastors so far as stating who they will vote for from the pulpit and if so they loose their tax exempt status. Do you think that is fair that Celebrities be allowed to indorse Presidential Candidates if Churches/Pastors are not? If so why? If no why not?
3 people like this
6 responses
• United States
10 Sep 08
It's called a separation of church and state. If a church uses it's money and influence to campaign for a politician, they lose their "tax exempt" status. Period. Celebrities are not representative of anyone but themselves. If they have political opinions, they have the right to express them - just like you do. Oh, and by they way, they don't have tax-exempt status.
2 people like this
• United States
10 Sep 08
Okay, well just because the "Church" is tax-exempt dosent mean the STAFF/Pastor is. So what is the difference?
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Sep 08
Pastors still pay taxes even if the Church does not
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Sep 08
"Okay, well just because the "Church" is tax-exempt dosent mean the STAFF/Pastor is. So what is the difference?" It's the church that cannot be used as a promoter of politicians, not the pastor in his personal life. Palen's former church and pastor announced to his congregation that if they voted for John Kerry, he would be concerned about their immortal soul. If you can't see the difference between that and what Britney Spears says, I can't help you. Personally, I think all churches should pay taxes.
@Sheepie (3115)
• United States
10 Sep 08
I'm one of those people who also support the separation of Church and State. Celebrities are just people who get a lot of attention. They can share their opinion and do whatever they please, really. Pastors and such have people depending on them and listening to their every move and analyzing it. It will make it harder for religious people to have their own opinion because, they might feel too obligated to agree with their leader.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Sep 08
while I think you have some good points, celebrities are also people who are listened to and have every move analized. After Brittney Spears kissed Madona did you not see our country start a new fad? While yes gay/lesbians have been around for centuries, would we have ever allowed a song called "I kissed a girl" to play on our childrens ipods/radios/tvs? No. But once Brittney and Madonna made it ok, so did America.
2 people like this
@pmenard (139)
10 Sep 08
I think it is so unnceccesary. Do you remember when Chuck Norris supported Hukabee? I was at the gym and it was on MSNBC for 20 minutes. I couldn't believe it even made the news.
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Sep 08
Speaking of Huckabee, he was a pastor, so a pastor can run but not endorse? hmmm...that's not right.
1 person likes this
@piasabird (1737)
• United States
10 Sep 08
Separation of church and state. Trinity should have lost their tax exempt status when Wright preached for Obama as a candidate. Made it sound like he was the second coming. And who really cares what celebrities say?
1 person likes this
• United States
10 Sep 08
Lots of people care about the Celebrities not to mention the young voters unfortunatley. Yes Trinity should have lost their status I agree, but Seperation of Church and State dosent really have anything to do with endorsement of a presidential candidate.
1 person likes this
@RevSkull (271)
• Tokelau
10 Sep 08
There is no relationship between the two unless John Travolta starts preaching about politics in his Scientology church. Clergy are free to endorse who they want as private citizens but not in front of their congregations. I don't care what they say...my fellow clergyman or some celebrity. My concern is with myself and my family.
@evanslf (485)
10 Sep 08
Celebrities can endorse whoever they like as they are citizens like everyone else. Same goes for church leaders so long as they do it in an individual capacity. As far as the churches themselves, when church leaders speak to their congregations, I think it is legitimate for them to point out the issues Christians should concentrate on, but those issues should not be confined just to abortion, there are many other issues, eg poverty, world peace, the environment for example that should also be of concern to church leaders and their flocks. I think it is legitimate for church leaders to point out these issues to their congregations and explain each candidate's stance on these issues. This would then enable the congretations to decide for themselves and the Bible talks about giving individual free will (ie free will to follow God or not, same should apply when deciding who to vote for). What church leader and of course charitable organisations should not be doing is ramming their endorsement of a particular candidate down their congretation's throats.
@RevSkull (271)
• Tokelau
10 Sep 08
There's one enormous problem with your response...why do you only talk about Christians and the bible? Which brand of Christianity are you selling and why? If we are to take all non-Christians in this country, we'd have more than 50 million people. No cleric who wants to have the tax free exemption should be allowed to tell his congregation how to vote. No matter how you parse it, any cleric in front of their congregation talking positively about one candidate and negatively about another will be perceived by his flock as having told them how to vote...clearly a violation. The only "free will" in the bible relates to whether to sin or not or to believe or not. Servants are to obey their masters and the congregation will always consider themselves as servants to their clergyman.
@Taskr36 (13923)
• United States
10 Sep 08
Churches are non-profit, charitable organizations that should not be advocating for politicians. However, if they begin to lose their tax-exempt status then such actions need to be taken against other non-profits who have been doing the same thing for the last 8 years, namely the NAACP.