Part 3 - The Impact Of The Obama Economic Plan For America's Working Women.

United States
September 13, 2008 2:02pm CST
Since Sarah Palin and John McCain refuse to discuss the issues facing America's Working Women, I have nothing to go by. But here is Barack Obama's position on the issue. More than 19 million women are uninsured in this country, and women are more likely than men to delay or not get medical care because of high costs. Barack Obama is committed to ensuring that all Americans have health care coverage by the end of his first term in office. Obama’s plan will encourage insurers and providers to adopt electronic claims systems, electronic medical records, and patient safety reporting systems. These improvements will reduce administrative costs and health care inefficiencies such as duplicative testing and medical errors, which in turn will reduce costly medical malpractice lawsuits. These common sense steps will cut overall health-care costs by up to 10 percent or more. Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women, accounting for nearly 39 percent of all female deaths. Studies show that after a first heart attack, women are less likely than men to receive diagnostic, therapeutic, and cardiac rehabilitation procedures, and are more likely to die or have a second heart attack Women are also more likely than men to report having arthritis, asthma, autoimmune diseases, and depression. Health care disparities among minority and poor women are especially pervasive. Barack Obama has fought to maintain funding for the Centers of Excellence in Women's Health at the Department of Health and Human Services. Barack Obama also supports legislation to encourage research that will examine gender and health disparities. The same legislation would establish community outreach programs in underserved areas to help women access health care and maintain healthy lifestyles. Ovarian cancer is the fourth-leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the United States. Because of the lack of early symptoms or a proven screening test, ovarian cancer also has the highest mortality of all cancers of the female reproductive system. Barack Obama is an original co-sponsor of Johanna's Law. Signed into law in January 2007, the law will educate women and increase awareness of ovarian cancer. Obama has also supported efforts to combat breast cancer, another leading cause of death among women. He helped pass legislation in the Illinois State Senate to expand insurance coverage for mammograms. Since Sarah Palin and John McCain refuses to discuss these issues, I'd like to know where they stand. Lloyd
3 people like this
11 responses
• United States
13 Sep 08
in the beginning of this campaign series i stated i wouldn't vote for obama i was strictly behind Hillary but now things have drastically changed .while i wish obama had chosen Hillary the fact that republicans chose a woman running mate to sway the women s vote did nothing to attract me for Sara Palin is no Hillary Clinton !Obama has my vote now!
• United States
14 Sep 08
I understand your feelings in the beginning of this campaign. But I was always confident that once people got to know Barack Obama, they would change their opinions of him. Barack is full of energy. He has a definate vision for the American people. He has fresh and well needed ideas. And he is full of compassion. In my opinion, the Sarah Pailin effect is starting to wear off as we get to know more about her. I don't think she has the best interest of the average American citizen in mind. I believe she is just more of the same. I wish she and John McCain would begin discussing the real issues facing the American people. I have yet to hear how they will deal with the record home foreclosures, record unemployment, record budget deficit or any of the issues that impact the average American citizen. John McCain and Sarah Palin should not be given a free pass. Lloyd
3 people like this
@ZephyrSun (7382)
• United States
13 Sep 08
I really do not understand why Republicans fight universal health care. Aren't they for helping businesses? Think of how much money that would save all business not just small business. I'm a victim of Bush's HSA and my family should not even have health insurance although our plan is better than some. My husband's employer puts in a tiny bit of money a month, then once we reach ten thousand dollars in medical bills the insurance company starts picking up some of the expenses. We still pay a lot of money each month for the plan, if nothing else that Bush has done in office hasn't proved he is an idiot HSA's should. I say harooy to Obama for this. And, I'll be waiting for your break down of the education plan lol just kidding
3 people like this
• United States
14 Sep 08
Many Republican politicians are basically hypocrites. They enjoy the benefits of taxpayer funded healthcare for them and their families, but rail against those same taxpayers having affordable taxpayer funded healthcare. I tried to purchase affordable healthcare on the open market and the plan that suited my needs was over $1000 per month. And that still included a deductable. The United States of America is the only Superpower in the world. Yet we are the only industrialized nation that doesn't provide affordable healthcare to its citizens. In my opinion, that is immoral. We can and must do better. Lloyd
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@ZephyrSun (7382)
• United States
14 Sep 08
I agree. We pay almost $300 a month for a family of five and have a deductible of ten thousand. Not really worth having insurance in my opinion but my husband is afraid something major will happen so we continue to pay the high cost.
3 people like this
• United States
14 Sep 08
In order to decrease that deductable, you would have to pay about 1000 dollars per month. Either way, this is not affordable healthcare. We need to do a better job of providing Americans with affordable healthcare. Lloyd
2 people like this
@lvaldean (1612)
• United States
14 Sep 08
I agree with you on the issue of McCain and Palin not addressing many of the issues that are affecting the people of the United states today. These include the following: Housing Medical Insurance Availability & Health Care Jobs & Employment Economy & Trade Diplomacy (really part of Trade) Equity in Lending Immigration Taxation However, Lloyd I have got to say this in part because I am a woman and I believe it is important for people to understand that gender is not 100% of the reason for the pay disparity. Choice is approximately 90% of disparity issue and it is impossible to correct disparity unless the government makes a decision to apply rules that would create greater burden and reverse discriminatory practices. I, as a woman, would be disturbed by this, to say the least. Here is the real issue behind pay disparity. I am going to use a small scenario so that you can see the timeline and process involved. Joe and Sally are the same age with the same intellect and capabilities. They attend the same university and receive the same grades in all their core classes in accounting and finance. They are both recruited straight from college by a big name accounting firm and do their time in junior roles receiving high marks and both sit for their CPA at the same time receiving passing scores. For the first 5 years of their careers they essentially are tracking similarly earning the same money and the same promotions with 3 months of each other. At the 5 year mark they are both earning $65K and they are both managers with the firm. They also both marry at this time. They are both 27 years old. They are also both on the Partner track which means that within another 5 years assuming they continue to perform well they will both be offered a Jr. Partnership within the firm and within 10 years they will be offered a Partnership. Now is when the fun begins. At 30 Sally has her first child. She takes time off, 3 months, to stay at home with her child. Joe has his first child as well but he does not take time off. Sally returns to work after maternity leave with no real affect on her position, however her work begins to suffer as her focus is now differently directed. Joe continues to be highly focused on the prize. At 32 both Sally and Joe have their second children, this time Sally decides to leave work for an extended period (5 years) while Joe remains focused on his career. Joe makes Jr. Partner and is working toward Partnership, Sally is a SAHM with no earnings. Joe's earnings are now in the $150K + bonus range. Sally sees her children into the school days and decides to return to work. Joe and Sally have kept in touch through the years and he offers her a position in the firm she left 5 years ago. He knows her capabilities and skills. He will bring her back as a group manager at $60K annually. Joe can do this as he recently made Partner! His earnings are now in the $500K + bonus range. This was an extreme case, however it is accurate. It is choices. The fact is that women and men make different career choices all the time. Men choose careers that are harder, dirtier, more physical and that pay better. Women choose careers that will allow them time with their families. Men do not exit careers for periods of time to care for their families, women do. Some of this obviously is the difficulty in entering certain job classifications, men are physically stronger than women and women are child bearers. But some of this is simply the way in which society works. I would not have the government step in and say you must pay a woman the same as a man despite that woman not having the same experience and skills. That is simply BS. Women must learn to stand on their own two feet and compete, they must stop whinning. Yes the Court ruling that they only have 65 days to complain was bogus. Yes, gender discrimination happens just as other discriminatory practices happen. However, not everything is due to discrimination. Sometimes it is because we don't negotiate well, sometimes it is because we don't stand up for ourselves and say this is what I am worth in the market so this is what you must pay me. We allow ourselves to be underpaid and then whine about it when we find out the guy in the office next to us made a better deal - it isn't because he has a outtie rather than an innie it is because he did a better job at selling himself.
• United States
14 Sep 08
Thank you for providing a detailed opposing point of view on this issue. The case scenario you speak of may have something to do with the wage disparities between men and women, but I also believe there are other reasons why many women earn less than men in similiar work environments. I agree with you that women should stand up for themselves, but I don't believe they should be punished for child bearing and rearing. Once again. Thank you for your well thoughtout response to this discussion. Lloyd
2 people like this
@lvaldean (1612)
• United States
14 Sep 08
It isn't punishment. It is however a choice. If I choose to have children and take time out of my career to stay home - it is choice. If I choice a career that allows me to do so -- again choice. Women are not victims anymore, sorry. Much of this is Feminist mythology. If I have the same capabilities, same education, same skills, same time in career path, same history of success then I am worth the same in the market. If I fail to negotiate the same package of money, bonus, and benefits I am a victim of only myself. If on the other hand as an employer you have a pattern of paying my gender less you have a pattern of discrimination. Yes it happens. I do not disagree that it happens, however it does not happen most of the time. You cannot compare apples to oranges and call it discrimination. You must compare apples to apples and then determine whether discrimination exists. As a woman I know that it does exist. However, as a woman I do not want to be a victim of Fem-nazi tactics that assumes all disparity is a matter of discrimination. It is not. Most is a matter of choice. Women are not being punished because of their choices, they are however having to pay for their choices and that is called the free market. I want a free market. I also want small government. I want accessible healthcare. I don't want a government however that manages it. It is purely a matter of how we see the world Lloyd. As a woman I want to be free to compete. I don't ever want anyone to say that I won my position because someone had to give it to me not because I was deserving but simply because I was a woman. I am deserving. I win because I am willing to go to the same wall that my male counterparts go to. I negotiate as hard, I play hardball. I win!
1 person likes this
@coffeebreak (17811)
• United States
13 Sep 08
All I heard in the CLinton admin was better health care, more health care for the needy...I never saw it.
2 people like this
• United States
14 Sep 08
There were never over 40 million Americans without affordable healthcare during the Clinton Administration. Anyway, Clinton is not running for office, even though he would be elected in a heartbeat. Tell me about John McCain's and Sarah Palin's plans to deal with the healthcare crisis here in America. Does he even have a plan? It's easy to pick apart Barack Obama's plan because he HAS one. Lloyd
2 people like this
@coffeebreak (17811)
• United States
14 Sep 08
My point was, all I heard during the CLinton admin was about affordable health care and I didn't have it cause I couldn't afford what I was offered.
2 people like this
@venshida (4837)
• United States
14 Sep 08
Where did you get the stat that women are less like to seek medical care. Every stat I have read said that men are the one who do not see medical care especially routine care like Prostate Exams. On the electronic claims, Most insurance companies are already doing that. I work in the health insurance industry for years, and I know the large insurance companies start doing that 5 years ago or more. I know the amount of paper claims that comes through the companies I am familiar with are about 1%. You are right electronic submission does decrease administrative cost. I think Obama has some good ideas, and would really help the poor more than John McCain. I don't think John McCain has really work on any woman or poor people issues during his time in the Senate. I am not a 100% though.
• United States
14 Sep 08
According to the Society for Women’s Health Research, women make three-fourths of the healthcare decisions in American households and spend almost two of every three healthcare dollars. While 59 percent of physician visits are made by women, women are less likely to seek preventative screenings and medical care for the same diseases that affect others in their families. You can read more about it at the following link" http://www.womenshealthresearch.org/site/PageServer?pagename=hs_main As for electronic claims, I know that insurance companies have been doing that. What we need to focus on are the medical records. I strongly believed that electronic medical records are advantageous over paper charts with regard to storage of patient data, ability to generate patient reports, and track patient outcomes. That would also decrease administrative costs. As far as John McCain is concerned, we all know who he represents. It's not middle or lower class Americans. Lloyd
2 people like this
13 Sep 08
Hi lloydamthony111, QWell if Obama gets in to power let hope women are not treated as second class citzen and why is America in this day and age treats women like a second anyway? Tamara
2 people like this
• United States
14 Sep 08
I believe Barack Obama does care about how women are treated. Here are just a couple of examples. Fighting for Pay Equity: Despite decades of progress, women still make only 77 cents for every dollar a man makes. A recent study estimates it will take another 47 years for women to close the wage gap with men at Fortune 500 corporate offices. Barack Obama believes the government needs to take steps to better enforce the Equal Pay Act, fight job discrimination, and improve child care options and family medical leave to give women equal footing in the workplace. Expanding Paid Medical Leave: Today, three-out-of-four low-wage workers have no paid sick leave. It is fundamentally unfair that a single mom playing by the rules can get fired or lose wages because her child gets sick. Barack Obama supports efforts to guarantee workers seven days of paid sick leave per year, a moderate proposal that should not impose too onerous a burden on employers. Investing in Women-Owned Small Businesses: Women are majority owners of more than 28 percent of U.S. businesses, but head less than 4 percent of venture-capital-backed firms. Women business owners are more likely than white male business owners to have their loan applications denied. Barack Obama encourages investing in women-owned businesses, providing more support to women business owners and reducing discrimination in lending. In my opinion, Barack Obama is the right choice for women. I don't hear John McCain or Sarah Palin discussiong any of these issues. Maybe they just don't care. Lloyd
2 people like this
@mehale (2200)
• United States
16 Sep 08
I must say that the more that i hear about and from the McCain camp, the more they scare me. With Palin under ivestigation, and McCain avoiding more issues than he is willing to talk about, I fear what our nation will become if he is elected!
1 person likes this
@clrumfelt (5449)
• United States
16 Sep 08
lloyd, thanks for all the info, but by now I thought you'd have realized that Obama just TALKS. His plans for the nation are not financially doable. He is prominsing everything and will deliver nothing. For example, he has made a big deal about his plans to remedy the pay discrepancy between men and women in the workplace, but when you look at the record on his campaign staffers shows he is paying women on his staff just 83 cents for every dollar he is paying the men. All he gives is flowery words and lofty speeches, but he is never going to deliver on them and his actions prove it. Hypocricy, Hypocricy, Hypocricy. Those who believe him are buying into a pipe dream because words are all they are going to get. Here's the scoop on his campaign staff: http://article.nationalreview.com/?q=NmEzMTZmNTk5MDI0NTZmNjUwMjllN2ZlZTc0MWFmYzY=
@suruchi86 (1873)
• India
14 Feb 09
I'm so sorry for coming so late. Since now Obama is the president of USA we can see his plans turning into reality.
• United States
14 Feb 09
Hi Surichi. President Obama was the right person at the right time to deal with all the problems left behind by the previous administration. He's facing the problems head on and I believe that we will soon see his plans turning into reality. I know that there are many who openly state that they want him to fail, but it won't happen when you have the support of the majority of Americans. Lloyd
@suruchi86 (1873)
• India
15 Feb 09
I strongly believe that Obama will surely succeed in changing the America as wel as the world, people everywhere have put lot of faith in him.
@Tifana (1)
• United States
14 Apr 09
I have some questions about Obama economic plan's for America working women. What will happen if his plan is "right"? and what will happen if his plan is "wrong"? Actually, I'm not American, but I am really interested in his point about women and low incomes families. So I really want to know your opinion about that. Tifa,
@anniepa (27520)
• United States
21 Sep 08
Gee, Lloyd, I really have nothing much to add other than to thank you for pointing out what Obama has done and will do for women's health and economic issues. I might add that with Joe Biden as his running mate we women can feel even more sure that we have two true friends in the Administration. I'm still totally blown away that apparently the McCain camp thought women would jump to his side just because he picked a female as his VP. Don't get me wrong, I certainly realize there ARE conservative women who are probably quite impressed with Palin but for them to think any Democratic women and former Hillary supporters would jump ship for that reason alone really offends me. I have a feeling McCain and Palin will continue to refuse to discuss these issues because they have nothing to offer! Annie