Convicted felons in Florida have their rights restored?

United States
September 17, 2008 9:01am CST
Hello everyone. I heard just this morning from a friend in Florida that Governor Crist has done something to restore convicted felons constitutional rights. This would include the right to vote and the right to keep and bear arms. I was just wondering if this is true or not and if so, what you all think about it. My friend told me he did it to get more people to vote. If it is true, I have mixed feelings about it. I've always known that the convicted felons could buy back their rights but very few could afford to do so. I'm all about letting them vote but am not too sure about them having guns. And before every NRA member out there jumps on my back, I am a lifetime member of the NRA and fully believe in the 2nd amendment.
1 person likes this
2 responses
@cbreeze (1206)
• United States
17 Sep 08
To my understanding this is restoring voting rights to non-violent offenders who have completed their sentence and are off parole. Restoration of voting rights for convicted felons is inconsistent around the country and many ex-offenders don't even know they can have their rights restored. It isn't something new, it just shows how behind Florida was. I think there are only two more states that permanently disenfranchise felons from voting. I don't think that they should be denied the right to vote. If they have fulfilled their obligation to the state regarding their sentence, they should be allowed to vote. Keeping and bearing arms is a separate discussion from voting. Voting is part of making a viable contribution to society. How do you expect felons to make true change for the better if they are treated like non-citizens after they have paid their debt to society. It's like being invited to dinner but not allowed to eat.
2 people like this
• United States
17 Sep 08
I absolutely agree that their voting rights should be restored. Yes, you are right about treating them like non-citizens. You don't have to sell me. I have 3 family members who are convicted felons (non violent crimes) who have served their time and probation and are currently productive members of our communities. Thanks for a great comment on this disucussion and I hope you have a wonderful day.
@xfahctor (14126)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
18 Sep 08
Honestly, this is a state issue and is entirely up to the people of florida to decide. I am all for people who have paid their debt and aren't guilty of expecialy horrd crimes haing rights restored. But again, it is up to the state they reside in to decide.
1 person likes this