Families and Politics

@clrumfelt (5452)
United States
September 27, 2008 9:26am CST
Some of my family members have gotten into an intense political discussion and there was a disagreement which left some of them mad and not wanting to speak to the others. My daughter also tries to draw me into political discussions and she always disagrees with my opinions. I won't argue with her, but she keeps bringing it up anyway. Does your family have intense political discussions and disagreements Do they have polite and civil discussions or do they go away angry?
4 people like this
9 responses
• United States
27 Sep 08
My family has a pretty wide range of political views and beliefs - and those views tend not to be partisan. My parents disagree on most political issues, my brothers all have their hot buttons, I'm in the middle of the road and my kids are - like my brothers and I were at their age - pretty darn radical. I wouldn't call our political discussions 'civil and polite' - we yell at each other, we roll our eyes at each other, we suggest that the other is uninformed or just plain wrong. But when it comes right down to it, our political beliefs don't change our relationships and our love for each other. We don't hit below the belt, and that saves a lot of hurt feelings. It's fun these days watching my dad argue with my kids - who both are pretty left and liberal to his pretty right and conservative. I actually learn quite a lot from both of them.
@clrumfelt (5452)
• United States
28 Sep 08
It's great when families can disagree agreeably. It can also be entertaining to listen to their debates on the subjects from a spectator's perspective. Respecting each other's right to believe the way the do goes a long way toward promoting harmony in family relationships.
@kenzie45230 (3560)
• United States
27 Sep 08
I suppose this used to be a problem. But my family has learned not to talk about politics. About 2/3 of the family are conservative Repulbicans and about 1/3 are Democrats - some more moderate and some more liberal. We might briefly chide one another, but we've learned not to get into lengthy discussions.
2 people like this
@clrumfelt (5452)
• United States
28 Sep 08
I think such an agreement between family members promotes harmony. When families get together it is best not to mar the unity with political or other divisive discussions.
@Bobbysox (224)
27 Sep 08
Politics is a topic of discussion that always brings out the best and the worst in us all,and many of us get so pig headed about our own views that we close our ears to the views of those around us,believing that our views are the right ones ,we know there are many political viewpoints,and unless we are prepared to listen to all sides then we have a bit of a biased view.
2 people like this
@clrumfelt (5452)
• United States
28 Sep 08
I think people, in spite of what they say, tend to vote for the party rather than the person. They don't want to consider who is running and what they stand for.
28 Sep 08
Yes, I think this is happening to many families. In our family, I think my husband, two grown up children, and myself are the only Obama supporters. In the past, a lot of the family voted for Bush, but I had at least one other family member voting against him. This time, I think my sister's family might be voting for McCain, and it is likely because Obama is black. That bothers me, but I can't change it. I am trying to leave people alone, but I wish I could have an impact on their votes. However, I am unwilling to shred my family relationships for the sake of an election. I need and want them in my life long past the time when the presidency of either of these candidates is up.
@clrumfelt (5452)
• United States
29 Sep 08
You have made a valid point. Our families will long outlast the political terms of those officials and it's best to keep their loyalties intact by not promoting bad feelings because of political differences. Thanks for your comments.
@jzjqdkd (273)
• China
28 Sep 08
I am sorry for your story. i don't have that kind of problem,i don't think it is a good place to talk about politics, maybe as a way of entertainment to talk about it ,which will be okay,that occassion won't be serious.family is a spot that we can stay for rest not for angry or unhappy union.
@clrumfelt (5452)
• United States
28 Sep 08
I think it's better to be as your family and use political discussion only for entertainment. That way no one will take it personally and go away with hurt feelings.
@suspenseful (40314)
• Canada
28 Sep 08
We do not have any political arguments. My husband used to be for the NDP, and I am for C.H.I.P and we both like the Progressive Conservatives. The NDP is far left, and the C.H.I.P is a Christian party, but we both hate the Liberals that are like your Democrats, and the Progress Conservatives are like REpublicans but more to the Center. But I used to live in British Columbia and there was the Social Credit Party there and there were quite a lot of arguments because my father had friends who were staunch Social Credits and they could do no wrong. I was too young to understand their policies though.
@clrumfelt (5452)
• United States
28 Sep 08
It's great that you and your husband can focus on your points of agreement rather than have disharmony over your differences. You have the best of both worlds.
• United States
27 Sep 08
they are usually fine, but occasionaly people go away angry
1 person likes this
@clrumfelt (5452)
• United States
28 Sep 08
I guess it goes with the territory. Politics is a highly volatile subject.
• United States
27 Sep 08
my family and i for the most part agree on political issues.
1 person likes this
@clrumfelt (5452)
• United States
28 Sep 08
It's great when you can have civil discussions without worrying about hurt feelings, especially with a volatile subject like politics.
• United States
27 Sep 08
Pretty much the rest of my family except for my wife (thank God) thinks of my political opinions in the same way as many many myLotters. However, I have never let the fact that so many others are wrong bother me in the least. In my family, I have learned to not discuss politics. After asking them to at least read a book or a few articles on different subjects before discussing those same subjects and being ignored, I gave up on trying to have an informed discussion with any of them. Except, of course, my wife, who fortunately holds most of the same opinions as myself, except in those cases where I am wrong.
1 person likes this
@clrumfelt (5452)
• United States
28 Sep 08
Probably the most divisive topics for discussion are politics and religion. I agree with you. If a person is closed minded enough not to read and study both sides of the issues, it isn't going to help to argue with them.