Have you watched your parents grow old?

@dragon54u (31636)
United States
October 1, 2008 9:17pm CST
It's such a shock when I see my mom. She lives in Florida, I live in Ohio and she comes here during hurricane season. I love having her here but it's always a shock to see her looking so old. Although she doesn't look as old as she is, I remember her playing tennis with me up till she was 70, snorkeling with me at the same age, playing badminton with me as a child. She's so frail now, it nearly makes me cry. How do you deal with your feelings about an aging parent? Do you feel like crying when you think of their dying or when you see how fragile they are, remembering how they used to be your rock?
1 person likes this
3 responses
@sameroad (3180)
• United States
3 Oct 08
I see my parents growing old.. it's sad. they are still young though 50 and 52... but i can see it.. especially with my dad.. hes like hard of hearing and is just so ugh sometimes lol and i know its because hes getting old... it really sucks and it does make me want to cry... i've cried about it before lol when i stop and think about it.. i don't like it because it means i'm getting closer to having to say goodbye...
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@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
3 Oct 08
They have quite a while to go if they're only in their early 50's! But it's sad when we think of their not being here with us. What's worse is to watch them get so fragile where once they would swing us around and play with us, they can barely move without pain. Enjoy your parents while they are still relatively young and make sure that they know you love them.
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• Jamaica
2 Oct 08
Yes. It is a very difficult change to accept. In the end you, the child, becomes the caregiver to someone you have depended on all your life, to give you the care you needed. The emotions one feels can be mixed. You can feel sad one moment and frustrated the next, especially when they are being difficult about doing the things that needs to be done. Add to that the health problems, such as Stroke, or Alzheimers, and you have your job cut out for you. Without the support/cooperation of all in the family, it becomes a monumental task. My mom has had several strokes, but is a real trooper. Despite getting weaker every day, she always tries to be cheerful. Her attitude, and the fact that she was a loving, caring mother, gives me the drive to do the best I can for her. We have cried several times over the past few months because she got very sick. But then she pulls through, and once again delights in the simple things of life. The thought of her dying is also ever present. But I strongly believe it is a temporay state. That view helps to ease some of the anxiety.
@Thoroughrob (11748)
• United States
2 Oct 08
I have, and we live close and see each other often. It seems like one day I am with her and don't notice and the next, it hits like a brick. At this point, they are doing well, and going strong. I dread the day that something happens to either of them. I try not to think about it too much.
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@dragon54u (31636)
• United States
2 Oct 08
It's good that you're there for them. I don't understand families that move hundreds of miles from each other and only visit once a year or every few years.
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