Small amount of change..what do you do to them?

@katkat (2378)
Philippines
November 2, 2008 11:19pm CST
I have lots of 5 cents and 10 cents at home. I got them as a change for my groceries in supermarkets. I just stock them in big jars. I know I should use them but it is easy to use a whole bill than cents. Do you use them or just stock them in your house?
3 people like this
8 responses
• Malaysia
3 Nov 08
In my country we still do not have any coin changer in any supermarkets. I wonder why didn't they do this. Instead, in Malaysia we are practicing the method of "Senang Kira". Here every price will be rounded to nearest five cents. For example if a price is RM0.06 it will rounded to become RM0.05, RM1.28, RM1.29 will be rounded to become RM1.30, and so on. I like it when I don't have to pay for the extra cents. For example when the product's price is RM3.47 I only have to pay RM3.45 and I save 2 cents from there. However when the price is RM3.48 I have to pay RM3.50 and that means an extra of 2 cents. I don't keep my coins in a jar because to me it is better to keep it in a piggy bank so I can use it on rainy days. So far my piggy bank is almost half full and every time when it is full I will change it to money rolls. I do this by exchanging them with the grocery stores. They always accept coins because they need to use coins for their business transactions.
@katkat (2378)
• Philippines
9 Nov 08
Thanks for the response.
@zer0charly (5616)
• Philippines
3 Nov 08
oh! same here.. banks are accepting cents and change it.. there are also some grocery stores that change cents. if you are here in the Philippines, puregold grocery stores can help you out with your problem.
@katkat (2378)
• Philippines
9 Nov 08
Oh, thanks for the info.
@gr8life (6252)
• Malaysia
3 Nov 08
Hello katkat, My little son has just started to learn how to put money into his piggy bank. So, whenever I have coins, I will give them to him and wait for him to put the coins into his piggy bank. I don't bring coins with me anymore.
@katkat (2378)
• Philippines
9 Nov 08
My mom also taught us to save money in such a young age.
1 person likes this
@MizzLadyB08 (1174)
• United States
3 Nov 08
If you have A Food Lion Grocery store, they have a machine in there where you can cash in your change. A slip of paper willl print out of how much you have and you take it to a cashier and they will give you cash for it.
@katkat (2378)
• Philippines
4 Nov 08
It sounds great but we don't have that kind of store here. Thanks for the response.
@SomeCowgirl (32219)
• United States
3 Nov 08
Wow, you must have a lot of jars if you just stock them. Do you not change them for cash after a while? That is what my fiance and I do most of the time. Unless of course the total of our transaction is like 5.10 then we will dig for a dime. Have a happy day!
@katkat (2378)
• Philippines
4 Nov 08
I have two medium sized jars full of them. I think banks accept them as deposit. Maybe I will deposit it to my bank account.
@zhaychel (610)
• United Arab Emirates
9 Nov 08
I usually put my small change in my piggy bank. I dropped it there because I let my little cousins break it during christmas. They're so happy to see many coins scattered so I'll always do that thing for them. ^^,
@PearlGrace (3171)
• United States
4 Nov 08
I save up my change and drop it in a large clear glass canister. It reminds me of a flour canister but it is clear. It is over 3/4 full now. Then, I take it to the credit union and pour it through the coin counter and cash it in, usually for extra money when we are going on a trip. Occasionally, I'll dig change out of the bottom of my purse when I'm buying something, but usually, I don't go to the trouble.
@wiccania (3360)
• United States
3 Nov 08
I have a coin sorter that I put my change in at the end of every day. You'd be amazed how fast it adds up. I started using the sorter in February, and by May had saved about $150 in change. The sorter made it easy to put into coin rolls. I used a couple of the rolls as emergency gas money. The rest went toward some summer activities. Particularly a trip to Knoebles with some friends. I know in the states there are a lot of places where you can get your change converted into bills (which is what I did before heading out to Knoebles -- carrying around all that change all day would have been a huge pain in the butt).