can you catch aids by mosquito bite?

United States
November 7, 2006 10:52am CST
I think yes.
1 person likes this
35 responses
@J_peso (2434)
• United States
7 Nov 06
Mosquitoes do not inject blood when they bite. As a result, mosquitoes do not transmit the virus. What they do inject is an itch-inducing saliva that acts as a lubricant to aid blood extraction, but it does not carry the virus. Even if the mosquito you squashed had just bitten an HIV infected person, the virus would stay alive within the mosquito's body for a short time. The fragility of HIV makes it impossible to be transmitted through inanimate objects, casual contact, or insects. Mosquito bites do not transmit the virus in the same way that needlepricks do. Syringes are dangerous because they allow virus-infected blood to survive in a shielded, airtight environment. Mosquitoes, on the other hand, carry only a tiny amount of residual blood on the outside of their mouths after a bite. That blood is exposed to the virus-unfriendly outside air. . Even after an infected bite, the blood on the bug's mouth might not contain the virus at all. In any case, stop worrying about this one. You can rest easy now, Bitten not Smitten. Its a copy paste from awell known site but hope this explains everything u wanted to
3 people like this
• United States
7 Nov 06
i will ask you few more question.
• United States
7 Nov 06
ok will the mosquitoe itself will be infected.
1 person likes this
• India
8 Dec 06
NO
• United States
7 Nov 06
They say that you cannot, but I have always wondered if this is true. If you can catch malaria and such, why not AIDS? I always figured we were told it wasn't possible to prevent widespread panic or people visiting their doctor for a test every time they got bitten. However, just now I decided to dig a little bit and I came up with a website that explains why mosquitoes really cannot transmit AIDS. Rather than copying and pasting the entire article, I'll just pick some clips I find particularly relevant, and leave the link if anyone would like to read further: http://www-rci.rutgers.edu/~insects/aids.htm Mosquitoes Digest the Virus that Causes AIDS When a mosquito transmits a disease agent from one person to another, the infectious agent must remain alive inside the mosquito until transfer is completed. If the mosquito digests the parasite, the transmission cycle is terminated and the parasite cannot be passed on to the next host. Successful mosquito-borne parasites have a number of interesting ways to avoid being treated as food. [However] Studies with HIV clearly show that the virus responsible for the AIDS infection is regarded as food to the mosquito and is digested along with the blood meal. As a result, mosquitoes that ingest HIV-infected blood digest that blood within 1-2 days and completely destroy any virus particles that could potentially produce a new infection. Since the virus does not survive to reproduce and invade the salivary glands, the mechanism that most mosquito-borne parasites use to get from one host to the next is not possible with HIV. Mosquitoes Do Not Ingest Enough HIV Particles to Transmit AIDS by Contamination Insect-borne disease agents that have the ability to be transferred from one individual to the next via contaminated mouthparts must circulate at very high levels in the bloodstream of their host. Transfer by mouthpart contamination requires sufficient infectious particles to initiate a new infection... an AIDS-free individual would have to be bitten by 10 million mosquitoes that had begun feeding on an AIDS carrier to receive a single unit of HIV from contaminated mosquito mouthparts. Mosquitoes Are Not Flying Hypodermic Needles Unlike a syringe, the mosquito delivers salivary fluid through one passage and draws blood up another. As a result, the food canal is not flushed out like a used needle, and blood flow is always unidirectional.
2 people like this
• United States
7 Nov 06
quite a lot information. thanks for your reply.
• India
7 Nov 06
no never
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Nov 06
But why?
1 person likes this
• India
8 Dec 06
TRUE........... GO THROUGH THE ABOVE COMMENTS
@newwife (17)
• United States
7 Nov 06
that is a good question...if you can catch them from needles and a mosquito bite is pretty much like a needle since it penetrates the skin, I have always thought so too. How many people have hiv or aids and cannot trace it back to an individual? sounds logical to me, but doctors try to discourage that kind of thinking. Mosquito bites pass alot of other diseases, why not aids/hiv?
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply. yes i woundr myself. why?
1 person likes this
• India
8 Dec 06
HIV,A VIRUS CALLED HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS CAUSES AIDS(ACQUIRED IMMUNO DEFICIENCY SYNDROME) THIS VIRUS CANNOT, I REPEAT CANNOT SURVIVE IN MOSQUITOES............ SO AIDS CANT BE SPREAD BY MOSQUITOES......... ANY DOUBTS STILL??????????????
• United States
7 Nov 06
I don't think so, or everyone may have it
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply.
1 person likes this
@xiaojing (54)
• Singapore
7 Nov 06
errs. not at all.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply.
1 person likes this
• United States
7 Nov 06
When a mosquito bites someone, it does not inject its own blood or the blood of an animal or person it has bitten into the next person it bites. The mosquito does inject saliva, which acts as a lubricant so that it can feed more effectively. Yellow fever and malaria can be transmitted through the saliva, but HIV does not reproduce in insects, so the virus doesn't survive in the mosquito long enough to be transmitted in the saliva. Additionally, mosquitoes don't normally travel from one person to another after ingesting blood. The insects need time to digest the blood meal before moving on.
• United States
7 Nov 06
no
• United States
7 Nov 06
why?
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply.
@fvalente (851)
• Portugal
7 Nov 06
I think you can...
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply.
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply.
@burgoonster (3760)
• Canada
7 Nov 06
No You Can't
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply.
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply.
@myklj999 (47954)
• United States
7 Nov 06
From what I have read in magazines and such, the answer is no. But they could be wrong.....
• United States
7 Nov 06
lol. loved your answer.
1 person likes this
• India
8 Dec 06
THEY CANT BE............
• United States
7 Nov 06
I doubt it!
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply.
• India
8 Dec 06
NO DOUBTS.........
@sandronir (1444)
• Italy
7 Nov 06
No man don't joke please:D
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply.
@tusharb (3159)
• India
7 Nov 06
never..watch TV man
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply.
• India
7 Nov 06
Thats tooo rubbish man..
• United States
7 Nov 06
thanks for your reply.
@suzieque (2335)
• Canada
7 Nov 06
I've never heard of that. But I don't think you can contract aids by a mosquito. You can only catch aids by sleeping with someone, or transfusion of blood, or if a person with aids cuts herself and you have an open wound and touched it.
• United States
7 Nov 06
but the mosquito also sucks the blood will it also get hiv infection
@carlomeno (1086)
• Italy
21 Dec 06
No, this is a legend
@Xrated (3766)
• Pakistan
9 Dec 06
Yes I think it is possible
• United States
8 Dec 06
No you can't, in fact you can't really "catch AIDS". You CAN however catch HIV which then progresses in to AIDS.
@Tessia (12)
• United States
8 Dec 06
No they do not carry enough blood to give you the virus