Merry Christmas at retail outlets? I vote NO!!

@cyntrow (8524)
United States
December 11, 2008 3:22pm CST
Let me preface this by saying that I am a Christian woman and I do celebrate Christmas. I also realize the December 25 was not the birthday of my savior, but that is not the issue. I DO NOT WANT TO walk into my local Walmart and hear the greeter say Merry Christmas. THis says to me that Christian is the only religion that matters to the chain and the person. Happy Holidays includes everyone. It makes me feel sad that certain Christians feel the need to exclude everyone else. Any thoughts?
1 person likes this
14 responses
@Sheepie (3112)
• United States
11 Dec 08
Well, I celebrate Christmas and it has nothing to do with religion to me. It's just something we've always done and I think it would be strange to just not celebrate a fun thing just because I don't believe anymore. It just is what it is. I find it odd that people get offended at different things. For example, if someone told you "Happy Hanukkah" you probably wouldn't be offended, just wonder why they assumed like that, you were Jewish, when they have no idea if you are or not. People kind of just assume that most people celebrate Christmas. I mean, nowadays it's a little different, but I don't mind either way, I don't think it's something to really get too bothered by, because you have the rest of your life to worry about.
2 people like this
@ParaTed2k (22968)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
11 Dec 08
I case you haven't noticed, Christmas is a cultural holiday as well as a religious one. The people of the US celebrate Christmas for whatever reason they choose, religious or otherwise. I know a lot of people who don't have any particular religious beliefs at all who celebrate Christmas. A few years ago, i self recorded a CD of Christmas songs... the first person to buy it was a Jewish man in Israel. I've always thought it was ironic when stores put out a sign that says "Happy Holidays" so they won't offend any of their non Christmas celebrating customers.. but then "deck the halls" with nothing but Christmas decorations. If they mean "Happy Holidays" then they should include all the holidays they mean, Including Hanukkah, Winter Soltice and whatever else there might be...If they mean Christmas, they should say Merry Christmas.
2 people like this
@caver1 (1763)
• United States
11 Dec 08
I agree with you on several points. I also am a Christian woman and I celebrate Christmas. I also realize that December 25 was not the birthday of the Savior. But I don't mind hearing Merry Christmas, no matter who is saying it. Happy Holiday doesn't bother me either. I don't feel like it is excluding anyone, people can take it or leave it.
2 people like this
@owlwings (44060)
• Cambridge, England
11 Dec 08
I disagree. I celebrate Christmas but I would be delighted to be wished 'Happy Hannukah' or 'Eid Mubarak' by someone who celebrated those festivals. 'Happy Holidays' is just so namby-pamby and fearful of possible offence! For heaven's sake! If people are offended by good wishes of any kind, then it's THEIR problem, not mine. Walmart greeters can't, of course, be expected to blind guess everyone's religion (or none!). They are, presumably, told by their employers what to say (which makes their greeting less sincere than it might be, of course). I dislike the concept of 'greeters' anyway - behind their smile is the question "Now what can we sell you today? And how much more can we persuade you to spend than you would otherwise have done?" In that context, any seasonal wishes are, to my mind, out of place!
@lilcee (2703)
• United States
11 Dec 08
I don't really have a problem with "Happy Holidays" but when they start putting Xmas on everything than I have a problem. Keep Christ in Christmas. He is the reason for the season. I also don't like it when they call it a "holiday tree". What happened to Christmas Tree?
1 person likes this
@owlwings (44060)
• Cambridge, England
11 Dec 08
I hope that people reject such sayings such as 'happy holidays' and 'holiday tree' (I hadn't heard that) and the dreadful 'Have a nice day!' (said with no feeling whatsoever). 'Xmas' must be one of the earliest of the 'txtspk' phenomenon, invented by salesmen who wanted to fit as much into as little space as possible. It has the feeling of Xboxes, X-wings, ex-husbands, ex-wives, ex-lovers &c. I suggest that 'Christmactivists' print off some stickers with the word 'Christ' and stick them over the 'X' of any sign you can! An 'X' is the mark we use to erase something, so 'Xmas' is saying, really, that the festival has NO significance to anyone who uses it! I propose that we wish our fellows to be 'ever green' and that 'the light may shine on' them.
• Dayton, Ohio
12 Dec 08
Actually if i racall right, along with the Icthus, the Early Christians used the symble X as a designatir for Christ, so, you have them to blame for Xmas.
1 person likes this
@cyntrow (8524)
• United States
12 Dec 08
They were closeted Christians, dancer. Frankly, I have never heard of a "holiday tree." Give your source, please. I see this a propoganda and I find all propganda hard to swallow.
@Ldyjarhead (10241)
• United States
12 Dec 08
I'm confused. If you are a Christian as you say you are, you know there is no other God but the one true God. If you say that's not true, then you are not a Christian and need to go do some reading or consult with your pastor or something and see if you can figure out exactly what it is you profess to be. Loving everyone as God has commanded is one thing, but saying that it's ok for everyone to have another god is quite another matter entirely.
1 person likes this
• United States
19 Dec 08
AMEN, Ldy! I totally agree! Merry Christmas to you and God bless!
@phoenix25 (1541)
• United States
1 Jan 09
Well, Judaism and Islam both worship the same God that Christians worship. Christians worship the God of Abraham, which you can read about in the old testament of the Bible. The Jewish Torah (which is the first five books of the Bible), Muslim Q'uran, and Christian Bible are all in worship of the God of Abraham. So, some religions do worship the same God.
@benhilo (871)
• Tripoli, Libya
11 Dec 08
I also object, all should be included! Further I do not like to celebrate Christmas, with all its pagan references. However, no offense to our fellow pagan humans. Besides, for what Christmas stands for in general, I like to celebrate it year round. I like to give family, friends and sometimes total strangers gifts when they lease expect it! Make it more memorable and satisfying!!!
@owlwings (44060)
• Cambridge, England
11 Dec 08
'May light always shine for you!'
@benhilo (871)
• Tripoli, Libya
11 Dec 08
Thank you!!!
@Sillychick (3277)
• United States
12 Dec 08
It doesn't bother me a bit. I am a Christian, but I don't mind if someone says Happy Hanukkah to me. The message is not that their religion is better than mine, but that they want to share the joy of the season. When someone says that to me, I say 'thank you, Merry Christmas.' I know people who give Christmas presents even though they don't celebrate Christmas, but they are acknowledging that the recipient does, and they take the opportunity to express gratitude and share in the joy of the season. That is what the season really should be about, not about segregation based on religious beliefs. In today's world, political correctness is being taken way too far. People put up Christmas trees in public places and call them 'holiday trees.' That's not what they are. They are Christmas trees. They don't want to tell children about Santa Claus because it is 'lying.' They can't celebrate birthdays in school because children of certain religions, such as Jehovah's witnesses, don't celebrate birthdays and they don't want them to feel bad. Where does it end? Tolerance is about seeing the differences in each other and accepting them, not about hiding the differences. In your post, you say 'happy holidays' would be a more appropriate greeting to include everyone, but that doesn't include everyone. There are many people who don't celebrate any holidays this time of year. So to include those people, we would have to avoid holiday greetings altogether. Speaking to strangers at all is offensive to some people, so to avoid offending anyone, we should just never talk to anyone. That would solve all of our problems, right?
1 person likes this
@greysfreak (1384)
• United States
12 Dec 08
I am a complete supporter of Merry Christmas, not that I don't appreciate the traditions of other religions, but really, if I said it to someone I'm speaking more from a secular tradition than a religious ideal. I am not really religious, I believe in God, heaven, etc... But I'm not super religious, so I really don't take the remark "Merry Christmas" as someone trying to shove their beliefs down other people's throats, and I really don't think anyone who says it means it that way. I mean, are you offended by "Happy Thanksgiving"? That is about the same, it may not be regarded as a religious holiday, but it's basically about the same thing, family, food, friends and tradition--with Christmas having the addition of presents. Everyone is entitled to their own opinions, I just don't see the big deal, I had a friend in college who is Jewish and she organized and participated in our dorm-floor's secret santa, at the time I thought that was a pretty big deal, but I've heard that it's not completely unheard of for Jewish people to celebrate Christmas. I definitely don't want to offend, but I'm just so tired of this idea that "Merry Christmas" is equivalent to insulting someone or cussing them out. Christmas has been celebrated for a very long time, and it's only in the last few decades that it seems to have gotten some enemies, and that truly saddens me, there is too much negative in the world already, we need to try to stick to some traditions, some are actually positive, even if the PC police don't think so. Just my 2 cents, I say all of this completely out of respect, but also feel very strongly about it. Life is just too short to nitpick over every little thing, someone is gonna be offended no matter what at some point, so to spend a lifetime worrying about hurting someone's feelings is ridiculous, sure--don't do it on purpose, but something like Merry Christmas is meant in a positive way, and if someone doesn't believe in that they don't have to say thank you or even respond to it. Seriously, I have had my feelings hurt a lot in my life, and it was personal attacks that killed my self esteem, yet I don't see people running around trying to get people to stop name calling based on appearance and style and stuff like that, actually they encourage that, my point is, we all have to choose what to take in and what to throw back at people.
@phoenix25 (1541)
• United States
1 Jan 09
I really could care less either way. Either way, someone is going to be offended. I hate arguments like this for that very reason. Honestly, "Christmas" has become a period of time in American culture that is celebrated in December. I just wish people would make up their minds about whether or not people will be allowed to say the word "Christmas" and quit arguing about it.
• United States
29 Dec 08
I agree. In fact it is good to read that a Christian gets what the true meaning of freedom of religion really means.To assume that Every Walmart shopper is a Christian or that they celebrate Christmas is a huge mistake. It is times like these I wish I could vote for the best post, like the best response.
@Springlady (3986)
• United States
19 Dec 08
I will always say Merry Christmas! It is because of Jesus Christ that we celebrate and I will not be ashamed of Him! God bless.
• Philippines
12 Dec 08
If that so better you stay in your house and dont go out anymore, your are a pathetic person. lol
@Galena (9118)
12 Dec 08
another Pagan that doesn't mind being wished a happy Christmas. for many many many non Christians, Christmas is still something they celebrate. enjoying Christmas does not mean you are a Christian. I do largely view it as a secular midwinter celebration for a lot of people. to me, the TRUE meaning of Christmas is being with the ones you love, and appreciating them, eating well, and looking ahead to the coming year together.