Is cup hotter than the drink itself

India
January 18, 2009 10:36pm CST
When i am small my mother used to give me a big cup of milk everyday i used to say it is hot and i can't drink she used to say that the cup is hotter that the milk and convince me and make me drink the milk. Now i feel that it is true because milk gives its heat to the cup since some heat is lost the milk becomes colder than the container anyway i am confused can anyone explain me about this.
3 responses
@oyenkai (4396)
• Philippines
29 Jan 09
That sounds strange. I never had the same experience - if I use a ceramic cup, the cup never becomes hotter than the drink but it does become warm. If I use a glass and pour down the hot milk, then the whole glass is hot and I can't hold it, but the milk in it is still hotter. However, there is a valid explanation for your experience. If your cup absorbs the heat (law of conservation of energy says that it can be transferred - so the milk HAS to lose some of its heat when the cup grows hotter) but is made of material that hold the heat better than liquid then it can maintain that heat while the milk cools down (transferring the heat to air). :) That sounds about right. Thanks for the response on my discussion!
• India
29 Jan 09
Yes it may be true. Thanks for the response.
• United States
19 Jan 09
We do have cups at home that seemed to be hotter than the rest when placed in the microwave oven. These cheaper mugs were not exposed to certain heat when they were in the process of making it. Ceramics have their own classification that is why there are other ceramics called fine china. This types are made of porcelain and have been baked in the oven with right amount of heat over a period of time. They can be thick or thin but for sure they can withstand the heat of the food or liquid we place in it.
• India
19 Jan 09
Thanks for the responce.
@Yori88 (1468)
• Philippines
26 Jan 09
As in, the liquid is just hot, and there's nothing heating it up or anything, right? Well, I would have to say, the highest area of the container (assuming that there is a container) holding the liquid is the hottest. You've heard of convection, right? Where hotter liquids and gases rise up due to lighter density, and colder liquids and gases sink down due to heavier density. Same thing. Different parts of the liquid is assumingly at different temperatures, even if the difference is tiny. Any liquid that the slightly hotter than the rest will rise up to the surface. If it cools, then it will sink down, and any other liquid that is almost just as hot will rise up to take the sinking cold liquid's place. But of course, eventually, the liquid will cool to temperature of the surroundings...I hope that answered the question.