Frugal on one income, what does that mean exactly?

United States
February 13, 2009 9:55pm CST
I spent the early portion of my 20's watching a cooking show faithfully each week called The Frugal Gourmet with Jeff Smith. I used to think, growing up, that to be frugal meant one was cheap. I thought it meant cutting back on all expenses, saving every cent like a church mouse, and not enjoying anything that someone might deem an unecessary luxary for someone in my income bracket. I then began watching his show and realized that frugal didn't mean cheap. It didn't mean you couldn't enjoy life, but that in fact being frugal meant enjoying life on what you had. I've learned that for myself I plan out the things I want to invest in, even though we live on one income. For example, I buy olive oil even though it is slightly more expensive, because I can use less of it cooking, and it's healthier. I make sure to buy things to make brownies or cookies with during the two weeks because afternoon snacks are a treat. I invest in good clothing because I know it will last longer, just like investing in good shoes so that I'm not having to replace them several times during the year. How are you frugal? What sorts of frugalities do you enjoy with your family?
2 people like this
2 responses
@mysdianait (65104)
• Italy
14 Feb 09
I totally agree - spend more to save more! I wish I had learnt that years ago. I always thought that by buying cheap I would be saving but how wrong I was. Not that all expensive stuff, be it food or clothing, works out like this in the long run but a lot does. Over twenty years ago I made my best investment. I spent what seemed a fortune on a set of saucepans with some other utensils thrown into the deal. I'm not sure whether they are available world-wide but they are the sort they are not sold in the shops (well there are some copy-cats but not the real thing). I bought them when I attended a demonstration party at a friend's home. Of course the person selling them knew his job well but after all these years I am soooo thrilled with them. They are still in use daily and I have no udea of the amount of money (and time) I have saved by using them over the years. It took me months to pay for them but I have never bought a new saucepan since. They are the sort that once they reach a certain temperature, carry on cooking even though the burner is turned off. I also do the grocery shopping in the same store every week and often they have offers for non-food stuff. Spend a certain amount and you can buy glassware, crockery and other things at a quarter of the normal price. I have a stock of glasses, plates and lots of things now which will replace things as they break over the coming years, if they ever break as it seems I'm lucky and don't get too many breakages. Not to mention the portable heater (for winter) which I bought in a heatwave in July a few years back at half the price it was selling in mid-winter
2 people like this
• United States
15 Feb 09
That's fantastic. There is nothing to be said about having great cookware and knives in the kitchen. I have a really nice set of cutlary that I just adore. I also invested in a rice cooker a year ago and it was my best investment. It was a bit pricey to start with, but it's been with me all year and lots of perfectly cooked rice!!
1 person likes this
@mysdianait (65104)
• Italy
16 Mar 09
Thank you Anora! Happy Lotting!
@eaforeman6 (8983)
• United States
14 Feb 09
We cook and have great meals and get togethers. I rent movies from the library which dosent cost any money. We work on gardens together. I have a bread mchine and make bread. I make money online so its extra for things. I think we entertain ourselves at home alot more!
• United States
14 Feb 09
Oh, I love home made bread. I took to making bread about a month ago for the family. I can make two loaves in about three hours, for less then I'd spend buying pre-bought bread. I'd forgotten that libraries rent movies. I'll have to check that out. Thanks for sharing.
1 person likes this