So what do I know about it anyway?

@TLChimes (4838)
United States
March 21, 2009 4:43pm CST
Do you have links to some helpful site? Do you post such information any time you post about something? How do you "prove" what you know to people who don't believe you? I was told that I should share some links to some information on ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) because "otherwise all you are doing is spreading false ideas about it. This is neither helpful nor informative in any way." I get a bit upset when people tell me that I don't know what I live everyday. It crawls under my skin and festers. I know... I know... Let it go. And I will, after I state a few things and post some links. None are referral links so don't get trigger happy with the report button. I know from life itself that a few are always true: - no kid is like any other and even less so when they have a disabilities. - if you start young, the child can go so much further in life. - love alone isn't enough, it's a hard long road even with tons of help. Now for those links so I'm not spreading uneducated, and misleading garbage around: Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD): Guide to Educators and Parents http://www.med-ed-online.org/pdf/l0000004.pdf Children and Autism Spectrum Disorders 101 http://www.lowershoreccrc.org/autismarticlemaci.htm Providing Care for adults with Autistic Spectrum Disorders http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/118711021/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0 Early on (I highly recommend everyone with a young child and concerns to look at this site and any that your state or area may have) This is Michigan based but still some great resources and information. http://www.1800earlyon.org/ That should start you all off.
2 people like this
4 responses
@mummymo (23707)
24 Mar 09
Oh Chimes sweetheart what an awful thing to say! That is like refusing to believe someone who says it is raining outside without looking to check for yourself. Has it really come to pass that people will believe nothing that is not backed up by an internet site? Surely these are not always correct anyway! I trained and qualified as a nursery nurse many years ago and I KNOW that all these thigs you have said are true! xxx
1 person likes this
@TLChimes (4838)
• United States
24 Mar 09
Yes, it's not the nicest feeling to have someone say that to you. And knowing that I can't really defend myself, makes it worse. Thank you for standing with me. It's nice to have such a great smile around!
1 person likes this
@mummymo (23707)
24 Mar 09
Anytime Sweetheart, I feel really strongly that even if we do not always agree there are was of disagreeing - agree to disagree no point in hurting other people just to try and make them believe as we do. I have made really good friends with people who have been on the opposite side of a debate with me - even on really controversial and emotive subjects - do not let anyone make you feel as though you have to think the same way as they do - that is wrong and would make the world a very boring place indeed! Be You sweety - there is no one better you could be! Hugs xxx
1 person likes this
@TLChimes (4838)
• United States
25 Mar 09
Yes Mum. If I forget... remind me. Please and thank you.
1 person likes this
@syankee525 (6293)
• United States
26 Mar 09
yeah i have ant used to have people tell me the same about bipolar which i do have. they tell me this and that. i did the samething i sent different sites to family and close friends
1 person likes this
@TLChimes (4838)
• United States
26 Mar 09
Silly people.... they question those who know it best and don't get that they are being hurtful.
• United States
22 Mar 09
This looks really informative. I thank you for doing this I know I'll need to come back and dig a little deeper. Not only that I hope others take a little interest in knowing a little more about this subject, a little knowledge can be dangerous, knowing something is the cure and key to the path onto being wise and educated.
1 person likes this
@TLChimes (4838)
• United States
22 Mar 09
Yes, anytime they send us in a new direction I research and ask questions and I compare answers because not information covers all situations. The more we know... the better prepared we are.
• United States
23 Mar 09
TL- This is a good start for parental resources. You may wish to also include ERIC which is one of many national clearinghouses for journal articles. http://www.eric.ed.gov/ The links that you have listed will also reference various journals as well, but this website will allow parents to pull them up based upon their own personal studies. There are many websites out there on ASD that are very misleading about the disorder, and provide inaccurate information. Much does stem from a desire to see the world a perfect place but when doing any sort of research one should always review the literature available. Empirical data is always the first one that should be looked at because it involves "pure research". Quantitative research is preferred, but most of the research in education will be Qualitative (case studies, etc). One should keep in mind to look at the qualifications of the researcher. One should also avoid popular magazines as their main resource for anything dealing with research. They may lead you to key terms but they will not help you know accurate information. No offense against parents as they are a valuable asset in the IEP process, but research written by a parent more then likely isn't going to be "pure research", it's going to be a well heartfelt account of their life as a special needs parent. Again, as I stated in one of your other threads on this matter, there was a commercial just recently here in Minnesota for a parent's website about ASD stating her son had been "cured". That is extremely misleading. This type of propaganda is just as bad as the actors/actresses going around advising parents not to give their child vaccines when it is well known in the research community that the Denmark study was found to be unethical for many reasons and was thus retracted from print. That should tell people a great deal, so it's why I recommend parents to actually sit down and read actual journals over a popular website, blog, or threads on social networking sites. Threads on social networking sites are great for networking and support, but not all will provide legitimate research information. Namaste-Anora
• United States
23 Mar 09
The following is another link for your list: Special Education Links via CSADP (Center for the Study and Advancement of Disability Policy). This site has links to major resource sites for parents of special needs children, as well as those in the field. http://www.disabilitypolicycenter.org/links/specialed.htm
• United States
23 Mar 09
I came across the Autism Collaboration a year ago when doing some research on it during student teaching as a part of my graduate work. It's an interesting site as it has links to a great many other Autism links. http://www.autism.org/
@TLChimes (4838)
• United States
23 Mar 09
Most people know that you can't believe everything you read on the Internet. But about the woman who said her child was cured... There are many people who say that their child's symptoms all but disappear when they do certain things... there are medicines, diets and behavior changes that greatly help the kids. Here's the name of one that thinks her child is cured or controlled- Jenny McCarthy. She's not some nut, she's well educated, well spoken and knows how much better her child is now compared to then. As for the vaccines... the popular thought among ASD parents is to spread them out not force them in all at once... now that the amount of mercury is "out" (which it isn't but that's a whole other discussion. And nothing I posted in the other thread needed this one. Thank you for your links. Be well.