So much for the "Pro Choice" Lie!

@ParaTed2k (22977)
Sheboygan, Wisconsin
March 27, 2009 1:41pm CST
I have long contended that both "Pro Life" and "Pro Choice" are just political buzzwords used by people who lack the spine to say what they really think. I've also thought it was funny that both the "pro life" crowd and the "pro choice" crowd are quit to agree with me, but only about the other side. "Pro Choice" people like to hide behind the myth that the term fits because "while I wouldn't have an abortion myself, I don't want to take the right to choose from anyone else." Ok, the Central Committee are putting the whole "choice" thing to the test. They are working to rescind what is called, "The Conscious Clause". The Conscious Clause is a long standing tradition that allows health care professionals the choice in being involved in abortions or not. To be truly "pro choice" a person would support the Conscious Clause, because it respects the right to choose. I wonder how many of you say you are "pro choice", but support Obama, Pelosi and Reid in their open attack on the freedom to choose?
9 people like this
24 responses
• India
27 Mar 09
I simply cannot support abortion. Individuals having the choice to pick any take is a nice thing, but there are occassions when choice of a person has to be curtailed, if possible. It's not dictatorship... it is to speak for the right of those who cannot speak, the weak and the vulnerable.
4 people like this
• United States
31 Mar 09
I can't help but add my amen to these!!
1 person likes this
@spalladino (17921)
• United States
28 Mar 09
Ted, I don't have the time to read all of the responses so forgive me if I'm repeating what someone else has already posted. The Conscious Clause is not just about abortion. Under the Provider Refusal Rule, workers in health-care settings -- from doctors to janitors -- can refuse to provide services, information or advice to patients on subjects such as contraception, family planning, blood transfusions and even vaccine counseling if they are morally against it. The bill was so broad, that it even allowed insurance companies to deny coverage of any medical procedure they deem against their morals/religion. I'm not saying that a doctor shouldn't have morals or ethics, but I do object to anyone in the medical profession denying services which are necessary or in the patient's best interests based on personal rather than professional morals and ethics. If that were the case, then Jehovah's witnesses could work in ER rooms, and deny patients blood transfusions, Scientologists could work as psychologists, and deny proper medications and treatments for people with serious disorders, pharmacists could refuse to fill prescriptions and refuse to give said prescriptions back to the customer, and part of a medical team in the ER could simply refuse to do part or all of their job because it's "against their beliefs".
• United States
28 Mar 09
Wow, you make some very good points that had not occurred to me before.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27279)
• United States
28 Mar 09
Thank you for making it so clear and easy for everyone to understand! It's not all about abortion. Annie
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
28 Mar 09
True, I think we can agree that the Bush expansions went too far.
1 person likes this
• United States
27 Mar 09
I am technically pro-choice, meaning that you should not be forced to have or perform an abortion or be forced to carry a pregnancy to term if you are ill equipped to handle the responsibilities of parenting or the pregnancy arose form a traumatic event such as rape. I agree that "Choice" means the right to CHOOSE, meaning that doctors and other medical professionals absolutely should not under any circumstances be forced to perform any procedure that they find morally objectionable. There are plenty of others who will do the job, so why FORCE somebody to do it if they find it morally objectionable? Choice means the right to choose, there is no force involved in true choice. Many doctors find euthanasia objectionable, so therefore choice involves being free to not kill somebody if you do not support that act on moral grounds. I fully support the Conscious Clause, if it will preserve the freedom to choose not to have to perform acts that you feel are wrong.
3 people like this
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
27 Mar 09
Thanks, I don't agree with your pro choice stance, but I commend you for not picking and choosing who should get the "choice" and who shouldn't.
4 people like this
• United States
27 Mar 09
Thank you.
1 person likes this
@oneidmnster (1387)
• United States
27 Mar 09
I'm completely Pro-Choice.Although a man doesn't really have a right to decide what a woman does with her body.All women should be able to choose what's right for her.
1 person likes this
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
27 Mar 09
But do you think health care professionals should be free to choose whether to take part in abortions (or other contraversial procedures)?
3 people like this
• India
28 Mar 09
But oneidmnster, should not the choice be given to the baby in the tummy too? Yes, the baby inside cannot choose to speak out, but given the choice I am sure none of them will choose to die.
2 people like this
@miamilady (4923)
• United States
29 Mar 09
soonernation...why shouldn't a dad have the right to prevent abortion? 9 months...labor pain...labor complications...DEADBEAT DADS. Having said that. I do believe the fathers feelings should be considered, but I also feel that the ultimate decision should be the mothers. She is the one that caries the fetus to birth and 9 times out of 10 if both parents don't raise the child it is the mother who ends up caring for the child.
1 person likes this
@irishidid (8716)
• United States
27 Mar 09
I really don't like the term pro-choice, but unfortunately we don't have another term. No matter how you argue it, you can't be the mind and conscience of anyone but yourself. Personally, I feel abortion is wrong but how I feel is not something I can force on another person. As for Obama and the others they have no more right to force their views than I do.
1 person likes this
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
27 Mar 09
So we should quit using the political buzzwords and say what we mean. I'm against abortion on demand, but as a medically trained person, I acknowledge that there are times when abortion is medically necessary.
2 people like this
@mommaj (22872)
• United States
28 Mar 09
I don't believe in abortion either but I am pro-choice. People should make up their own minds. I love children. I would hate to think that someone that wanted an abortion couldn't have it and then the children they had are abused or killed later in life by them or worse gets stuck in the system to be abused. As for medical professionals having a right to decide whether or not to do their JOB, I completely disagree with that. Suppose I wanted liposuction and every dr I went to said no because they wanted to see me exercise. Should they have a right to refuse me service when they chose their profession. I would agree that Dr.'s can choose whether or not they perform services as long as they can recommend someone who will do the service at a reasonable price. If your specialty is ob-gyn then no you shouldn't have the right to choose. It's part of your job and you need to find another one if you don't want to do your job.
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
28 Mar 09
Mommaj, you can't say you are against abortion, then say it should be legal. You are pro abortion, you just wouldn't have one yourself.
@Latrivia (2889)
• United States
27 Mar 09
"To be truly "pro choice" a person would support the Conscious Clause, because it respects the right to choose. " I'm truly pro-choice then. A privately practicing doctor should not be forced to a procedure against his will. He or she is under no governmental obligation to perform non-emergency medical services, as far as I know. There are plenty of fish in the sea willing to abort your fetus for you - all you need to do is take a trip to your local Planned Parenthood to find them.
1 person likes this
• United States
27 Mar 09
I thought I was the only "truly pro-choice" person! Thanks for making me feel less alone.
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
27 Mar 09
Thanks Latriva. Apparently some people say they are all about choice, but have no idea what the word means. I think they consider "choice" just a synonym for "abortion".
1 person likes this
@mommyboo (13197)
• United States
28 Mar 09
By not acting to SAVE a life that could be saved, two deaths may occur. By not saving at least the one that has a better percentage of being saved, that's like condemning them both. It's also not necessarily a wrong thing to decide who to save in order of who would be most beneficial to save either, in emergency situations, sometimes this is used, as in deciding whether to go back inside a burning building, or deciding which room to go to and who to get out, if you have to make a choice. Also, people waiting for transplants - if there is one genetically correct organ and two people and one is a child and one is a senior citizen, who is chosen? I know there is more than one factor there but many times it does come down to making a tough choice and yet people DO make a choice between the two instead of saying they won't make a choice at all, which is still essentially a choice. The only problem is that the choice to do nothing or not intervene sometimes makes the outcome worse.
@Taskr36 (13923)
• United States
27 Mar 09
I brought this up a while ago. The pro abortion crowd was really against the conscience bit. They think that they should be able to force doctors to perform abortions the same way some of the gay marriage folks want to be able to force priests to marry them .
1 person likes this
• United States
27 Mar 09
They really are simply "pro-abortion" and not at all "pro-choice" then. Forcing somebody to do something, anything, removes THEIR right to a choice. I happen to not have a problem with gay marriage, until they try to FORCE religious officials to perform them, then I have a BIG problem with it.
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
28 Mar 09
Exactly! To them "choice" is just a euphamism for "abortion".
2 people like this
@Taskr36 (13923)
• United States
28 Mar 09
"I happen to not have a problem with gay marriage, until they try to FORCE religious officials to perform them, then I have a BIG problem with it." Exactly. If gay people want to get married, I don't care. I'm not going to force my marital beliefs on them and they shouldn't force theirs on religious officials.
1 person likes this
@mommyboo (13197)
• United States
28 Mar 09
Well, I want each person to continue to have their own PERSONAL freedom to choose. I do NOT want someone who CHOSE to work in a health care (or any service profession) to have ANY right to NOT fulfill anything I ask them to do which is within their job description. This includes but is not limited to things like birth control, different procedures, other medication, alternative treatment, NO treatment, see where I'm going with this? I am the patient, client, or customer and I am paying someone who decided to work as an (insert profession here), and they had better fulfill their job obligations whether THEY agree with MY choice or not. They aren't required to ever agree with a patient or customer, they ARE required to DO THEIR JOB OR LOSE THEIR JOB. *I* respect the Conscious Clause, and I rather think that if you are going to work in the health care industry, you had better be prepared to do what people ask you to do within your chosen field. I did not vote for Obama so my answer to that is a resounding WTF... By the way, as it becomes harder to get the type of care or service that people want and deserve, there will be other ways to get what you want but it will either be expensive or unsafe - or BOTH. I wish people would think about this before shooting themselves in the foot by trying to take away choices from others. Sorry for venting but I get pretty hot about the idea that anybody else has any right to take away someone's decision or interfere with it because of THEIR OWN PERSONAL HANGUPS. You are right, I likely would not choose to have an abortion but I would have no problem counseling someone who WANTED to have one. If it was the right choice for them and I was able to help them because I CHOSE to be a doctor, then I guess I'd better do what I'm getting paid for, huh?
1 person likes this
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
28 Mar 09
So, what you're saying is, you respect your right to choose, but no one else's.
@mommyboo (13197)
• United States
28 Mar 09
I respect the right of each person to choose what they want as far as service. I do not believe a person in a service profession has the right to not honor what someone asks of them if it is their job. I know you don't see it this way but that doesn't matter. This isn't about MY choice. This is about each person's individually. Why should the right to choose be allowed within a job field? Again that's like saying you just don't want to be held to doing part of your job. I do not think people in a service profession should threaten, coerce, guilt, or discourage people into any choice, they should just be there to fulfill whatever the person DECIDES ON THEIR OWN. That is why they are there.
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
28 Mar 09
Mommyboo, quit lying, you don't respect choice at all, except for pregnant women. All others should be forced at gunpoint to do your bidding.
@grammasnook (1875)
• United States
27 Mar 09
I am considered to be pro choice because although I believe abortion should not be used for birth control there are circumstances that I believe are valid. As for doctors well let me put it like this sure they have a choice and their choice to work at a catholic or christian hospital that does not do abortion, but if they choose to go to a hospital that allows them then they should be held to perform them. I do not believe the government should be able to tell a religious hospital that they need to have these accomadations. The doctor does have the right to choose, he has the right to choose working in a hospital that performs or one that does not. As I stated above hospitals of faith should not be forced to have this service. I had to go to court with one of our mentally challenged individuals that had gotten pregnant the mother was trying to get the courts to force her to have an abortion because she is challenged. The woman which was 30 years old wanted to have the baby and with lots of resources she would be able to do this. I was the advocate for her human rights. We won and she had a beautiful little baby girl and both her and her now husband is making it and are wonderful parents with the resources they have. I also had to go to court for another individual that got pregnant and decided she wanted to abort the parent petitioned the court and said she would care for her grandchild. Our fight was that she was not emotionally ready to deal with the pregnancy and the judge ordered that she could have the abortion. The wheel goes round and round.
1 person likes this
@anniepa (27279)
• United States
28 Mar 09
Grammasnook, I think you could rightfully refer to yourself as both pro-choice and pro-life! To me the whole abortion/choice/life or whatever other buzz-word anyone cares to call this issue is a very personal one that doesn't have a "one Size Fits All" answer. I applaud you for going to bat for people on both sides of this issue. One thing that always puzzles me in discussions on this topic is that it seems like everyone is assuming every hospital or clinic in the nation offers and performs abortions on a routine basis and that is NOT the case at all, at least in my neck of the woods. There isn't a single hospital in my area that I'm aware of that does abortions for any reason other than in a medical emergency and the closest Planned Parenthood clinic that does it is about 80 miles away. Therefore, regardless of the law there shouldn't be a problem for any doctor who doesn't wish to perform abortions. Annie
1 person likes this
@mommyboo (13197)
• United States
28 Mar 09
That is fine if there is such a thing as a religious clause at a particular hospital, but I do believe that there should always be equal opportunity for people. If a doctor is working at a clinic or hospital that DOES perform abortions, then because they took a job at THAT clinic or hospital, they need to perform their job even if they do not PERSONALLY agree. When someone's personal issues get in the way of them doing a job, that needs to be dealt with, and I don't mean by allowing the person to let their issues continue to control them. I also am with you in that I do not feel abortion should be used as birth control. It is not something easy and it often scars women with regret for life, even if at the time it was the right decision for them. Like you stated, I really believe the choice should belong to the individual only who is getting the care, whether they want to keep a baby or are not mentally competent. I am extremely tired of all this round and round stuff including other people who really have nothing to do with the individual and shouldn't even have a say getting their fingers into the pot at all. Also, a health care person is supposed to be your partner and advocate in your care, they are supposed to outline all the possible choices and the pros and cons and then let YOU decide. They are not supposed to encourage or discourage, threaten, or sway you unless you ASK them for specific guidance. I wonder why things are falling apart in this arena now... do these people believe they are God or something??
1 person likes this
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
28 Mar 09
Grammasnook: I agree with much of what you say here. I believe in the right of healthcare professionals to be able to choose, but part of that choice is where they choose to work. The doctor or nurse who chooses to work for Planned Parenthood (for example) should be expected to carry out the policies of Planned Parenthood. The same should go for those who work for (say) a Catholic or other religious based facility.
• United States
29 Mar 09
This is utterly stupid! Doctors should be free to choose as much as anyone else. What is this world coming to? My husband dealt with an attorney once who would not represent him in his divorce from his first wife, he said it went against what he believed and referred us to someone else. He respected that decisions and contacted the other attorney end of story. Doctors should be able to refuse abortions, immunizations or anything else they morally disagree with.
1 person likes this
• United States
29 Mar 09
I agree with you, there are always others willing to do the job that some find distasteful, so why force anyone to do it against their morals?
@ZephyrSun (7382)
• United States
27 Mar 09
Well then wouldn't you agree with "Obama, Pelosi and Reid " for once? lol This is another topic that confuses me with the whole no big government as long as they tell women what they can't do with their body.... I am pro-choice and have had an abortion so I'm not "one of those people".
@xfahctor (14126)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
27 Mar 09
but do you feel it is right for a doctor to be forced to perform one? and do you think it is an appropriate place for federal law to permit OR outlaw abortion?
1 person likes this
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
27 Mar 09
Your "pro choice"? So do you agree with the Conscience Clause or not?
1 person likes this
@ZephyrSun (7382)
• United States
27 Mar 09
I feel that if doctors or any other professional does not like a certain aspect of their job then they should either find another job or they should get over their problem. I don't believe that when it comes to actual health care the government should not say you can't do this and you can't do that. I mean it's like if one has cancer the government should say you can't have chemo or you have to have chemo.
1 person likes this
@urbandekay (18308)
27 Mar 09
Here in UK, many medics will, rightly, refuse to perform abortions, it is good if your medics also get this right of choice. all the best urban
@urbandekay (18308)
27 Mar 09
And those that advocate abortion under the thin disguise of 'pro-choice' yet do not support such a bill are hypocrites all the best urban
@mommyboo (13197)
• United States
28 Mar 09
That is like telling someone 'you can pick and choose what you want to and do not want to do within this job field, and it's okay'. In my opinion, this is NOT okay. If you go to medical school and become a doctor or a nurse, you need to be willing to do everything that your job entails. If you are not, then you chose the wrong profession. It is not fair to make consumers and patients have to 'shop around' for a doctor or health care professional, there should be some definite 'all doctors do this' clauses or that doctor can find another profession. Sorry, otherwise as your burger flipper today, I can decide I do not want to make chicken sandwiches so if you order one, you won't be getting it. It's my personal choice to not make the chicken sandwiches but look - it's affecting you - the customer. Is that fair? No. Should I be allowed to keep my job? No. Should you get your chicken sandwich? Of course you should. Especially if you paid for it.
1 person likes this
@urbandekay (18308)
28 Mar 09
No, it is not at all like that. Medics here in UK take what is known as the hippocratic oath, in which they swear to preserve life. Therefore, a medic asked to perform an abortion may feel, rightly, that they are being asked to perform an operation that runs contrary to their oath. So, we can quickly see your analogy of the burger flipper is wholly inapplicable. all the best urban
@CRIVAS (1818)
• Canada
28 Mar 09
I personally believe that the choice to have an abortion should rest with the person getting it, and only that person. It is no one else's business what a women does with her body. I know that if I was in a situation where I had no choice but to get an abortion or give it up for adoption, I would abort. I know that there are a lot of people that think that this is the wrong choice, but I have to say it: IT IS MY BODY AND MY CHOICE. I think that Obama is choising what he thinks is best, it's his choice to make that doesn't mean that I have to agree with it. There is another reason that I believe that this is a choice that should only be made by the person having it done, if a women is determined enough she would find a way to get rid of the unwanted child if there was no one else available. I think it is wrong for people to take the right to choose away from another person. What makes them think that they know what is best for everyone? I know that personally I think that personal matters are just that, personal! I don't think that anyone should have the right to take that away just because they don't agree with the choice. I think that if we are going to start doing that, we might as well just forget freedome all together.
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
28 Mar 09
So it's no one's business what a woman does with her body, but if she wants an abortion she can demand it from someone else, even against their will? What about the rights of health care professionals to do what they want with their bodies? Should they be forced to use their hands, minds and knowledge against their will?
@Taskr36 (13923)
• United States
28 Mar 09
No Parated. The pro-abortion argument is that choice only counts when you are CHOOSING to have an abortion. They don't want the doctor to have a choice over THEIR OWN BODY. That just doesn't fit the pro-abortion agenda. Choice for them, but for nobody else. As this thread has clearly shown, "choice" is a code-word for abortion.
@spalladino (17921)
• United States
29 Mar 09
[i]So it's no one's business what a woman does with her body, but if she wants an abortion she can demand it from someone else, even against their will? What about the rights of health care professionals to do what they want with their bodies? Should they be forced to use their hands, minds and knowledge against their will?[/i] Who exactly is forcing these health care workers to work at these facilities? They have the right to choose where to work like anyone else in this country so, if the procedures are offensive, work someplace else.
@miamilady (4923)
• United States
28 Mar 09
I believe in "pro-choice" which some like to confuse with "pro-abortion" and yes, I agree with teh Concsious clause (if I am understanding it correctly). I don't think doctors should be forced to do procedures that they don't believe in. I also don't understand why a women would want to have her abortion performed by a doctor who doesn't believe in abortions. Of course I believe in a doctors choice assuming that there would be enough doctors who are willing to perform these procedures. It is always my belief that things are never black and white. I supposed if there was a shortage of doctors who were willing to perform these procedures then, we would have something more to think about, but as far as I know, this is not the case.
@miamilady (4923)
• United States
28 Mar 09
I just want to clarify my first sentence. I am pro-choice but not necessarily "pro-aborion" as some like to call it. I think abortion is a logical choice in some circumstances, but generally I don't think it's the "best" option. I do think it should remain an individual choice, but I wouldn't mind if people who choose this option were encouraged to be educated about birth controll in order to try to avoid repeat abortions.
@Taskr36 (13923)
• United States
28 Mar 09
I readily see a difference between the two. I define pro-choice as a person who want the option to be available, whether or not they agree with it. I see pro-abortion as someone who actively WANTS abortions to happen. Those are the people who want to force doctors to perform abortions, get children to have abortions without parental notification or consent, and are sometimes willing to break the law and transport minors across state lines to expedite rape.
@miamilady (4923)
• United States
29 Mar 09
Although I don't agree with your position on abortion, I do have to say I am suprised by how many pro-choice people on here are saying that they don't believe doctors should have the right not to perform abortions. The way I see it, if a doctor goes into a career as an OB/GYN they are going to go into a career to help women with their health and also to help them to deliver healthy babies. I'm assuming these are the doctors that would be forced to perform abortions even if they didn't want to? I don't see how performing an abortion is necessarily a part of their "job description". Now, outside of the topic of abortion, I WOULD have problem with a doctor who refused his services to a patient for other reasons such as race, nationality etc. I'm not sure if that is part of the concience clause or not.
@anniepa (27279)
• United States
27 Mar 09
Ted, please forgive me for being a bit confused here since I've been away for a couple weeks and therefore have been "out of the loop" when it comes to some of the latest political developments. Is this something new on this issue or is it about the Obama Administration's rescinding of the parts of the Conscience Clause Bush had just added right before leaving office? If it's something totally different and doctors and other health care workers would indeed be forced to perform abortions if it was against their conscience, that's wrong but the changes Obama had made before didn't do that at all. I'm also not sure what you mean by the "Central Committee". On the other hand, I don't think it's acceptable for a health care provider to withhold information from someone just because it's something they don't personally approve of or believe in, such as a pharmacist refusing to dispense birth control or advise a patient of other places she could get it. Bush's expansion of the Conscience Law went far beyond a doctor refusing to perform an abortion. Annie
• United States
27 Mar 09
Welcome Back Annie I sure missed reading your post and answers.
1 person likes this
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
28 Mar 09
Welcome back Annie! The Conscience Clause has been active for decades now. Before it was enacted, it was basically an unwritten rule in the medical community. Yes, Bush expanded it to beyond the traditional scope. The Central Committee (Meaning, Obama, Pelosi & Reid) do want to reverse the Bush expansion, and that is what led me to write about it, but I didn't limit it to the Bush expansion specifically. My interest in writing this was to challenge the buzzword "pro choice".. in other words, people seem to think "choice" is a synonym for abortion because that is the only context they seem to see in the word.
1 person likes this
@urbandekay (18308)
30 Mar 09
This discussion has exposed an interesting quirk. 'Pro-Choice' supporters often defend their view on liberal grounds; freedom of choice for the woman, etc. Yet, it is interesting to see how many, when faced with a liberal argument of choice for the doctor suddenly turn into little fascists. As I have always said, scratch a liberal, see a fascist! (To Americans here, I use 'liberal' in its generally accepted manner not your irregular manner.) all the best urban
@urbandekay (18308)
1 Apr 09
Not at all, it is fascist to curtail freedom for the sake of control where such curtails freedom but not for preservation of life, since laws preventing murder do exactly the same. We consider laws against murder not to be fascist, despite their being, to use your expression, your way or the highway because they protect human life. More generally, many laws actually increase freedom, consider if we had no law about which side of the road to drive on. all the best urban
@maximax8 (30105)
• United Kingdom
29 Mar 09
I am pro-life and I believe that life begins at conception. A fetus and a baby are innocent ones. Is is a shame that abortion is legal in my home country. The government allows abortion up to 24 weeks pregnancy because if it was illegal back street abortions would probably take place. The pro-choice crowd say it is the woman's right to choose and I see many have regrets after their baby has been aborted. I think Obama is pro-choice but I don't know about the beliefs of Pelosi or Reid.
@urbandekay (18308)
29 Mar 09
Well said all the best urban
@sid556 (30988)
• United States
28 Mar 09
I am pro-choice and I really really am. My own daughter was put in a position where she had to make such a choice. She wanted me to give her the answer. I refused. I told her of my experience and then told her to go with her heart. I was ready to support her and be here for her regardless of her choice. I,myself, chose to keep my babies even tho I got pregnant on birth control and in questionable times. That was me and my choice and I gave it much thought before choosing to keep my babies. I was very grateful for the freedom to choose. I also agree that health care officials should be allowed to refuse abortions if in their concious they are against it. In fact I think that a woman that is considering such a dilema should actually talk to doctors on both sides of the fence....should be a requirement as it will better inform her of both sides. Then let her have some time to make her own decision. This is not a light decision and the person wanting the abortion or struggling with it should be given thoughts on both sides of the argument and then time. The Pro-lifers are just as questionable,,,they get pretty violent at times too.
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
28 Mar 09
Thanks Sid. I agree, "pro life" is also just a buzzword.
@II2aTee (2559)
• United States
27 Mar 09
I get it now. I see what your saying, and it does make sense. Really the only argument against what your saying is where would we draw the line? Lets say a Doctor does not condone smokers. They could then, by this line of thought, be allowed to turn away smokers. Or, if we want to kinda get radical... what about a racist Doctor? A Doctor could choose not to see black or hispanics. I see what your saying, and you make alot of sense, so Im not trying to fight here. Just playing devils advocate. Where would the line be drawn if Doctors could pick and choose who they serve? Sometimes, in the line of duty, all people need to put aside our predjiduces, and do what is expected of them. And if we dont perform our jobs, as expected, we should be removed from that position. Especially in such a far reaching public capacity as the medical feild.
@ParaTed2k (22977)
• Sheboygan, Wisconsin
27 Mar 09
Why draw a line? The Conscience Clause has worked for decades now.
1 person likes this
@taface412 (3175)
• United States
3 Apr 09
When it boils down to it I agree with you. I think people who say they are prochoice but wouldn't do it themselves inherently know abortion is murder. because otherwise they would consider it an option for themsleves as well, or whatever the reasoning behing them saying why they say it. Personally I view it as a murderous act. I think any health care professional who does this other than for the means of saving the mother's life (as in severe complications to her life) is giong against the hypocratic oath of preserving life. I think this stuff needs to stay out of the governments hands. it helps divide people. I am not saying we need back alley abortion clinics, but we need people to realize that it is not birth control and the healthcare people who work in these clinics need to focus on that. This is not a politically correct view at all, but it is my feelings on the matter. But like I said I think the government should not have any control over anyone even though it happens everyday.