In the worst case senario, lets look at the facts, to be prepared, what steps

United States
March 29, 2009 7:20pm CST
should everyone be taking right now, in the event of a total depression getting worse? Let us look at the worst things that can happen, and what can we do to be more prepared? Heres what it was like for them http://www.kidsnewsroom.org/elmer/infoCentral/frameset/decade/1930.htm Imagine what it would be like to have a family full of brothers and sisters. Babies wrapped in blankets, no clothes underneath, their families couldn't afford them. Imagine all your other siblings in ragged hand-me-downs, and old scraps you found on the street. You're all so depressed, because Dad lost his job. You have to wait in line, all of you, every morning, really early, babies are still asleep, all for a microscopic crumb or crust of bread. This was the 1930's: The Great Depression was bearing down on all; Headline Events The 1930's was a time of depression, the Great Depression. The Great Depression lasted from the late 1920's all through the 30's. During this period, many people were unemployed, and many families didn't have much food. In this time, many other events occurred in our world, http://topics.nytimes.com/topics/reference/timestopics/subjects/g/great_depression_1930s/index.htm By Nick Taylor is the author of “American-Made,” a 2008 history of the Works Progress Administration. The Great Depression was a worldwide economic crisis that in the United States was marked by widespread unemployment, near halts in industrial production and construction, and an 89 percent decline in stock prices. It was preceded by the so-called New Era, a time of low unemployment when general prosperity masked vast disparities in income. The start of the Depression is usually pegged to the stock market crash of “Black Tuesday,” Oct. 29, 1929, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell almost 23 percent and the market lost between $8 billion and $9 billion in value. But it was just one in a series of losses during a time of extreme market volatility that exposed those who had bought stocks “on margin” – with borrowed money. The stock market continued to decline despite brief rallies. Unemployment rose and wages fell for those who continued to work. The use of credit for the purchase of homes, cars, furniture and household appliances resulted in foreclosures and repossessions. As consumers lost buying power industrial production fell, businesses failed, and more workers lost their jobs. Farmers were caught in a depression of their own that had extended through much of the 1920s. This was caused by the collapse of food prices with the loss of export markets after World War I and years of drought that were marked by huge dust storms that blackened skies at noon and scoured the land of topsoil. As city dwellers lost their homes, farmers also lost their land and equipment to foreclosure.
1 person likes this
4 responses
• United States
30 Mar 09
The Great Depression was, indeed, a huge disaster. We humans are resilient beings, however, and we came out of it stronger. We'll get through the hard times we're in now, too. I'm one of the working poor, but I can't help thinking that this, too, will pass, and we'll come out of it stronger and smarter than ever. It's frightening and intimidating, and people have to be creative in their juggling of the bills, but we survive and move on. Somehow, we'll be more aware of the greed and corruption that brings times like these upon us, and try to avoid future horrors. I know I'm often quite scared because of financial problems, but I also feel hopeful aobut the future. It won't happen quickly or easily, but things will be good agin!
1 person likes this
• United States
31 Mar 09
I think the problems will set in , when the very cheapest things that we survive on, begin to be eliminated. The costs rising are already affecting, some of those things. Rice and beans may not stay at the prices that they are at now. I think that these are legitimate concerns.
• United States
31 Mar 09
These are absolutely legitimate concerns. However, since it's unlikely that our incomes will grow at any time in the near future, we can only adjust. It's beyond hard, but without additional resources, most people can do nothing more than struggle on through.
1 person likes this
• United States
31 Mar 09
you are right. they give us no choice. We have to do the best that we can with what we have.It will be constant adjustment, but it won't be the fat cats doing it, it will be all of us.
@moneymommy (3419)
• United States
31 Mar 09
Well what we do is we keep food on hand for emergencys. This would be able to carry us for a little while. We have extra propane to cook with and a portable burners to cook on. We have will grow a vegtable garden for fresh veggies and we can always catch fish to cook and eat. We live in the south which would be easier to survive because you have many places to hunt and fish etc.
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• United States
31 Mar 09
Yes, the South, knows how to live off the land. The South knows how to raise food.....strong people in the South, and God bless them....Some of the best fishermen and hunters hail from the South......
• United States
31 Mar 09
hi eafore...the best that i could do is leave it all in the hands of God. i'm just inching along with $3.75 an hour. but my needs are provided for and i have good friends that pray for me. my job will end in august. but God has something for me. He always has. when i was pushed out of my job in 2007 i still had car payments. but i didn't lose my car. when i ran out of my money and ran out of help from others, i was hired by my present boss who paid me in advance to make my next car payment. even if i had lost my car i would still be in the hands of God. nothing is really ours anyhow. it is all a gift from God.
1 person likes this
• United States
31 Mar 09
Hello, my friend, I do agree with you and have faith in God, and do the works that the Lord that gives you to do. The faith in him will rise above any faith in man. The Lord does not have limitations.Blessings and best wish's.
@spalladino (17922)
• United States
30 Mar 09
The best thing anyone can do to be prepared for the worst is to have as much in reserve as possible. I live in Florida so we're used to being prepared for big storms and I look at our current economic situation as I do any other storm on the horizon. My husband and I have money in reserve, we're growing a vegetable garden and have access to a variety of fruits if it became necessary to take what we needed because we couldn't afford to buy it. There are fish in the rivers and the big lake, wild hogs that can be hunted. Down here in the south...and out in the country...it would be a little easier to get by.
1 person likes this
• United States
30 Mar 09
This is so true. hopefully we can share how to prepare and what all can we do. I was always taught to prepare for the worst, and if it's anything better then THAT celebrate. You have just given some greta ideas that could help people.