Power consumption of fans.

High Tension Transmission Lines - Electricity is transmitted at high voltages (110 kV or above) to reduce the energy lost in transmission. Power is usually transmitted as alternating current through overhead power lines. Underground power transmission is used only in densely populated areas because of its higher cost of installation and maintenance when compared with overhead wires,and the difficulty of voltage control on long cables.So overhead transmission is employed in of the places. which carries the voltage more than 11000KVa
@kumarpslv (3216)
India
March 30, 2009 3:13pm CST
Will the fan consume the same power at all speed or will it consumes less in slow speed and more in higher speed?
4 responses
@owlwings (43063)
• Cambridge, England
30 Mar 09
An electric fan should take less power overall running at the slower speed.
@kumarpslv (3216)
• India
30 Mar 09
Thanks friend for your useful information, so far I have been informed that it will always consume the same power, what ever may be the speed as the power supplied to regulator is same. Still I am having slight confusion here.
@owlwings (43063)
• Cambridge, England
30 Mar 09
I think it depends on how exactly the regulator works. A very early method of regulating the speed of a fan (or the power supplied to a light bulb, for example) might be to have a constant load - resistance - off which one drew what power was needed by a potential divider - the rest would have to be dissipated in heat somehow. I have a 2 speed fan by my desk and the switch does not seem to do anything as crude as that. The motor either has two windings which can be switched, there is electronics to limit the power (a thyristor) or there is a mechanical gearing which allows the fan to run at two speeds. What ever way is used, it certainly consumes less power at the slower speed, though I do not have an ammeter to tell me precisely how much. There are, in fact, several ways in which one can limit the power drawn by a load using alternating current and all of the ones commonly used today restrict the actual mean current drawn and thus use less overall power. The power used at half the speed is never, of course, exactly half the power used at full speed (there is always a small amount of power used by the limiting device) but it is certainly significantly less.
• United States
5 Apr 09
I would think to go faster like most other things would require a higher conusmption of energy.
@kumarpslv (3216)
• India
5 Apr 09
Thanks for your opinion and it seems it might be a true one
@benny128 (3621)
30 Mar 09
yeah its all down to the power the faster its turning the more energy it requires to keep turning, so slower speeds use less but not alot less. Tho fans use the most power starting and changing speeds.
@kumarpslv (3216)
• India
30 Mar 09
Thanks a lot for your useful information friend. I am searching for this still, and if I find any thing with large deviation with our opinion, I will let you all know.
@polachicago (19073)
• United States
30 Mar 09
I think that consumption is related to speed, but will not consume that much more. It is relatively higher consumption but maybe only 10 % more.
@kumarpslv (3216)
• India
30 Mar 09
Thanks for your information and still i am referring some articles related to this.