Dateline Woman says "I'm not responsible". Seriously

@taface412 (3175)
United States
March 30, 2009 10:27pm CST
On a dateline episode with Chris Johanson he interviewed people who are being affected by the banks who overlended money to people they knew could not repay. There was one woman who knowingly borrowed too much money. And when Johanson asked her who was responsible for getting her into this mess, she blamed the bank because they approved her. Now come on...maybe they were responsible for setting her up to get in debt but she was the one who signed the dotted line after all. Why do some people think they can always get a free ride with no consequences involved?
1 person likes this
9 responses
• United States
31 Mar 09
Some people never do anything wrong. If their life is a mess its someone else's fault. Too bad Chris Johanson didn't ask her is she was indeed an adult and if she could read. Why can't a grown person take some responsibility? So what, you lost your house....so did a pile of other people. If she can't understand what she was signing she shouldn't have signed it. I'm sure no one was there twisting her arm.
1 person likes this
@Qaeyious (2361)
• United States
31 Mar 09
I do not know if this applies to this particular situation, but it is my understanding that professionals were advising such people, that is with bad credit, or unable to keep up the payments, that it was all right because they can sell their house when the payments become accelerated, then buy another home. If the market had continued the way it was going several years ago, that would have been true. But it wasn't. I'm afraid to do anything now, since these "professionals" who get paid commission for giving advise like this. One has to become a professional these days to make sure the lowlifes are not taking you for a ride.
1 person likes this
• United States
1 Apr 09
Because there is no more personal responsibility left in this world.
@deejean06 (1953)
• United States
31 Mar 09
Hi taface...This is ridiculous! Of course she is responsible! She is the one who initiated the debt in the first place. Unless you're responding to a credit card offer, I believe you have to ask the bank to give you a loan for a mortgage or a car. So you are the one responsible for the debt - no one else!
@twoey68 (13651)
• United States
31 Mar 09
This is a double-edged sword here. Yes, the banks and lenders were wrong for giving loans to ppl that they knew couldn't afford to pay them back. At the same time, ppl were applying for loans that they knew they couldn't afford to pay back. Here's an example from real life: A friend of mine who is engaged and has 3 kids and lives mostly off welfare (her b/f works a minimum wage job), called me to tell me about a house they went to look at. As she's describing this gorgeous house, I asked her how much was it...try $250,000!!! I was stunned...there's no way she can afford it...heck, she couldn't afford to live in the ditch of that house. She says no problem b/c the reality agent said she could push through a loan for her! I told her to save her time and trouble and don't bother with it. The point is, she had no business trying to get a house that expensive with their financial situation and the agent had no business trying to set them up to fail. So while the banks should have been more strict about who got loans, ppl should have had more personal responsibility then to get in over their heads...and they have no one to blame but themselves. [b]~~AT PEACE WITHIN~~ **STAND STRONG IN YOUR BELIEFS**[/b]
@connierebel (1568)
• United States
31 Mar 09
That is the problem with a lot of people today. They refuse to accept responsibility for their actions and always put the blame on somebody else. That is also the cause of all the frivolous lawsuits there are nowadays. Yes, the bank was partly to blame, but she knew she was taking advantage of the system even though she couldn't afford the loan. She is part of the reason why we are in such an economic mess today. What a lowdown skunk.
@us2owls (1681)
• United States
31 Mar 09
I make my self well aware of what I can or cannot do in a financial matter before I sign on any dotted line at any time not just in the present credit crunch. I use a small town bank in central Illinois and I have to say this the banker I deal with is great. If I need a loan for anyhing I can go in the bank - sit down in privacy with the head banker and we discuss which is the best way for me to go. I listen to him and he listens to me. If we don't entirely agree at any time we always manage to come to a compromise. To just take out loans large or small that you know you can't make timely payments on is an idiotic move. This woman deserves to lose anything and everything that she has.
@Savvynlady (3685)
• United States
31 Mar 09
I feel if you went and got a mortgage and signed, that means and I'm remembering this from my Business Law class that if you entered a legally binding contract with someone, you are responsible to pay it back. Plain and simple. Of course, she can default, lose her good credit and all and let that be that. Which won't help her none in the future.
@saundyl (9686)
• Canada
31 Mar 09
She's responsible for signing and for repaying. However if she was advised even with bad credit and other bad debt to get the loan then it is bad advice someone else gave and rather silly of the bank to have loaned her the money if they knew she was over borrowing.