Okay....................that's it! I've had with all of the.....................

United States
April 3, 2009 6:39pm CST
crapping in my closets, on my shoes, and even on my sofa. I had to finally give my cat Louie away. He would use the bathroom wherever he wanted to. He has messed up my son's shoes for church, a couple pairs of sneakers (for both of my boys), he has messed up a couple pair of my boots (black and brown) and a nice pair of black shoes. But the worst part is when he started peeing on my couch I have washed that couch (love seat) so many times and was ready to throw it all but the only thing is is that I didn't have my set for that long, only a few years. And talking about a stink house! my sister says that he was spraying and that's why it was smelling like that. Well now the smell is gone and i can leave my closet doors open without worrying about a Gray Tabby crapping on my stuff............. I do miss him though
1 person likes this
11 responses
• United States
6 Apr 09
Did you bother to find out why he was doing this before you tossed him out like that crappy couch of yours? When a cat eliminates waste outside of their litter box it;s trying to get your attention to let you know what was wrong. A trip to the vet was in order, not a kick to his a*s as you booted him out the door.
3 people like this
• United States
13 Apr 09
Well said! Cats don't like to make where they aren't supposed to, they do it when they are trying to TELL YOU SOMETHING!
3 people like this
• United States
14 Apr 09
I am sorry but having a pet requires patience and responsibility if you are lacking either if those then you shouldnt really have a pet Did you ask your vet for suggestions? Did you ask an animal behavioralist for tips? or did you just throw the cat out like yesturday's garbage?
2 people like this
• United States
13 Apr 09
WTF is WRONG with you? I see a week later you're posting about wanting a new cat when you couldn't even care for this one and simply threw him away when it became inconvenient. I see you also gave away your dog when your CHILDREN didn't take care of him! Are you an adult? When you take in an animal, it is YOUR responsibility to care for it, it is a LIFETIME COMMITMENT! If you are unwilling or unable to hold up to that COMMITMENT you should not under any circumstances be getting pets!
2 people like this
@Opal26 (17683)
• United States
4 Apr 09
Hey Linda! Oh! I'm so sorry about Louie! I know that he didn't mean it! He just didn't know any better! Cats don't understand what they are doing. It is just a natural instinct and something that is just what they do! I hope you gave Louie to someone who will love him and take care of him! I guess you never go him fixed! That was the problem! Although, my two cats Cougar and Jaguar were fixed and they still made a mess of the house too! I think because they were fixed too late! I am so sorry about Louie! I know you loved him, but you have enough to deal with right now!
1 person likes this
• United States
4 Apr 09
It's my experience that inappropriate potty behavior is "usually" not due to hormones, but to some emotional or physical upset that begins a problem, and then bad habits continue it. You're absolutely right in that it's always better to neuter an animal, and it's true that it can and sometimes does help "some", by eliminating one possible source of the problem. But most of the time when I'm trying to help with a cat who's using the entire house as his or her bathroom, the animal has already been neutered. I've yet, in over ten years of helping people with their pets' issues, found one single case where having an animal fixed after the bad behavior has begun has actually stopped the behavior. It always takes retraining, scrupulous cleaning, and careful maintenance to finally help the cat to understand that his behavior is what is causing Mom to go off the deep end of upset, and what the correct behavior is to help his Mom regain her sanity. Neutering and spaying can help if there is a hormonal factor involved (a female going into heat, a male who senses other male cats in his territory, even at a distance), but shouldn't be seen as the total solution.
1 person likes this
@cbjones (1155)
• United States
4 Apr 09
Cats are unbelievably awesome. This one actively hated everything in your home, yet was still able to remain a resident for a good period of time. That, ladies and gentlemen, is the power of adorableness. This is why the feline uprising will be the hardest fought was mankind has ever seen. We don't have enough yarn balls in production to stop the lot of them.
• Australia
4 Apr 09
Oh that sucks. is it just a kitten?
• United States
4 Apr 09
This is liable to be a long post, but as a professional animal communicator, I help people deal with inappropriate elimination problems in dogs and, especially, cats all the time. This is the most common reason I'm called, and I'd like to pass along things that have helped literally hundreds of frantic feline families to deal with this very issue. It's a common belief that cats are inherently clean and will always choose the litter box ... which is, in part, true. However, it's not true that this is accomplished without any training. Not all kittens are litter trained by their mothers, and the truth is, that some cats simply don't know where the proper place is unless they're taught. In other cases, illness, territorial issues, and emotional upset can cause a cat to stop using the litter box. For a cat, it's normal instinctive behavior to use marking and elimination to try to communicate. If a cat who was previously clean starts going in odd places, the owner's first responsibility is to try to find out why the cat is upset. The very first stop in this journey of discovery should be the veterinarian. Does the cat have a bladder infection, a bowel disorder such as inflammatory bowel, or some other illness which may be upsetting his equilibrium? What is he trying to tell you? There is always a message -- poop and pee are not just poop and pee to a cat, they are part of his instinctive communication repertoire. Sometimes it happens that a cat which has begun inappropriate elimination due to a real reason simply continues it out of habit. Once an animal has gone in a place, its scent lingers (despite efforts to clean it up), and this tells the cat that this is an okay place to go. Unless the owner takes the extra effort to retrain the cat, in a gentle manner (no rubbing noses! Ugh, how would you feel if someone shoved your face in your own poop or pee?), the cat is going to continue going in shoes, on beds, in corners. It's not that he's being bad. It's that he thinks its okay, because his instincts (to go in a place where his smell lingers) over rides his owner's wishes, because the owner has failed to communicate, in a way the cat can understand, what the rules are. The key phrase here is "in a way the cat can understand". When we take an animal, of any species, into our lives and homes, we immediately start setting down guidelines for proper behavior. There's nothing wrong with this, but what most humans, in their typical human-centric way, fail to realize is that by doing this, we are asking our cat to stop being a cat! It is not natural instinct to use a litter box. A litter box keeps all of the leavings in one place. It's a human need, not a cat's, because it's easy to clean up. In nature, a cat marks territory by spreading his urine throughout his range. This is a good kitty, instinctively -- it keeps him safe, it keeps him alive, it prevents battles with neighboring cats. A cat, in nature, tends to hide his feces in places where it's safe -- places away from his den, and where the odor won't draw predators toward his resting place or, in the case of queens with kittens, her babies. Putting poop in the same place all the time, in the wild, would mean shouting to the coyote neighbors, "Hey! I'm here, come eat me!" So many of the things we ask our pets to do are totally opposite of what nature tells them they should be doing. The only reason they agree is that a. we have communicated our needs to them and shown them clearly what we want, and b. they love us. And yes, in their own way, they do love us. Some people would say that cats and dogs don't "love the way humans do", but who cares? They love the way cats and dogs do, but that doesn't mean it's not true love! If your cat is going in places where you don't want him to go, there is either a physical or emotional trauma going on, or there has been a failure to communicate. Either reason puts the onus on the human, who made the rules and therefore is responsible for correctly teaching them, to fix the problem. A cat can be retrained to a litter box. It's not an easy procedure, and takes an owner who's willing to put in the work to make sure all of the "no-no's" the cat has made are properly cleaned up and deodorized while the cat is confined. There are good enzymatic cleaners available in most online pet supply places that are actually quite good, and a black light will help you to track down hard to find spots. The cat should be confined for up to a week in a small room, such as a bathroom, with the litter box. Remove all soft surfaces such as towels and throw rugs, as this will make the litter the only place to go. Litter boxes must be kept scrupulously clean (I change the litter in mine every day, I don't like scoopable litters because even though they may mask odors for human noses, the cats can still smell that the bottom of the box is dirty). You may wish to switch to Cat Attract cat litter, in fact ... it's a great product that has helped solve potty problems in many feline households. After the week closed with the clean, fresh litter box, and a week of soaking potty places throughout the house with a good enzymatic cleaner, the owner should monitor the kitty's behavior to help him remember the rules. He should not be left unsupervised in the house for a while, but closed into his private quarters when the owner's not home, or when sleeping at night. Some cats prefer to have a second box in Mom or Dad's bedroom and be closed in with them at night -- kitties get lonely, too. Basically, when we ask our cats to move in with us, we're asking them to stop being cats in so many ways. That is a huge request on our part, and unless communications between human and feline are very clear, reinforced in a positive way, and reminders always in place, there are going to be gaps. The plan will fail when the kitty gets upset and communications break down, or when there is illness interfering with the process. I'm very sorry to hear that you gave your kitty away. I know you must be very sad. Please pass the above suggestions on to his new owner, because Louis is probably very upset, too. This means that he may start the behavior in his new home, and we don't want to come to find out that Louie's next stop is the local humane society.
• United States
4 Apr 09
Thanks, I hope it helps humans and kitties out there a little bit. :-)
• United States
4 Apr 09
great post
• United States
6 Apr 09
I'm so very glad you adopted the mamma-dog and helped her puppies. I know she was a great mother but that must have been a hard life, and I'm so happy to know she found a friend.
• United States
4 Apr 09
Aww. I absolutely love cats, but I can understand why you would be very upset with yours. I may also have been to the end of my rope and had to give him away. My cats had never had any problems going to the bathroom in the litterbox, but then out of nowhere we had a problem with one of my cats peeing around the house. We got pretty mad and were very close to getting rid of him, but turns out he was doing it because he was terminally ill and he finally passed. I miss him like crazy.
• United States
4 Apr 09
i love cats too but if it wasnt ment to be than it wasnt ment to be, there are other fish in the sea
@ShepherdSpy (8558)
• Omagh, Northern Ireland
4 Apr 09
as a kitten new to the house,my puss did some territory marking of his own,(which stopped once he was used to the place..)but at least he didn't continually take dumps in inappropriate places..this behaviour of your cat-He did this all the time? it wasn't just a phase? that'd be a lot to accept...sorry you had to let him go!
• Australia
4 Apr 09
It's completely normal for kittens to do things like that. U need to let it get outside alot more so just sit outside with it and when it wants to go to the toilet......then pick it up and place it on the dirt so it can dig a whole so it will learn. It's like toilet training. We've all done it
@lynnemg (4536)
• United States
4 Apr 09
As much as you miss the little kitty, at least you can finally breathe a sigh of relief and not have to worry about finding unwanted "packages" all over the house.
@CJscott (4195)
• Portage La Prairie, Manitoba
4 Apr 09
My dad would rub their noses in there mess, they smell way better then we do. Then he would put him in the proper bathroom place, and usually inside a month they would be trained. If not, off they went to the "farm." Whatever that meant.