Going Green

@JC1969 (1226)
United States
April 23, 2009 4:35am CST
Has anyone else noticed that they are really starting to embrace "Going Green"? What I mean is that you are actually becoming more aware of environmental initiatives we can incorporate into our daily lives. I got on the recycling band-wagon years ago. Actually, I think I really became aware of recycling when I was a young child and an active member of Brownies/Girl Scouts. I remember every month we would gather up old news paper and aluminum, and bring it to the local recycling venue. It was a great way to earn a little something for our troop, and a great way to help fund some of our fun-filled trips while doing some good for our environment---without even realizing it. But, I really have noticed that our family is really embracing "Going Green". We are buying more environmentally friendly products at the grocery store, we are learning more about what else we can recycle besides: paper, plastic, and cans. We are even starting to eat more healthy by using more organic products. Anyone have any good easy "Going Green" tips? Here's mine: Now, I know that "Green Products" and Organic/free range foods can be more pricey, but if you switch 1 or 2 products you will be doing your part.
3 responses
@Lakota12 (42681)
• United States
23 Apr 09
I think most people have done this already and I am geting tired of hearing GREEN lololo Would help alot if they would stop building more houses around here and messing up the desert1
@JC1969 (1226)
• United States
23 Apr 09
Hey Lakota12 Believe it or not, lots of people do not recycle, they do not take environment issues serious at all. I wish most people did. I lived in Arizona for several years, and it was difficult to get those that lived on our base to jump on board with the recycling program. Most said, it was easier to toss out the trash and the extra five minutes it took to take your plastics and put it in the plastic bin the base provided, and take your paper waste and put that in the paper bin they provided, was too much work. Now, I'll be the first to admit that buying "Green" products can be a bit more costly. But, there are so many other ways to jump on board. Heck I remember the, what the doctors on base called, "CRUD" cloud and smog that hangs over some parts of Arizona. If people would maybe walk more, bicycle more, and carpool more---wow maybe that Arizona Desert would rid some of that polution. I guess I live overseas now (though my mother is still in Arizona), and I see how wasteful and overindulged we Americans can be compared to our host country. They bicycle everywhere, they walk everywhere, they buy organically grown and raised produce and meats, they compost and they recycle. But then, this is nothing they had to jump on a band-wagon to do, because it is learned behavior that is part of their culture. You are right about the over-populating of the Desert areas, and definitely more has to be done to preserve this.
@DavidReedy (2411)
• United States
12 Aug 09
What we need is an entire cultural paradigm. I have an idea, one that I know will immediately flop, but here goes anyway: Put an end to the drive thru. And while we're at it, slow down the economic on the go pace that forces these things to be a necessity. By eliminating the drive thru and it's accompanying mindset we would: A) Minimize massive amounts of trash, litter, and CFCs. B) People would eat healthier (and thus be healthier and save on healthcare) and C) Families would eat together again re-strengthening the time-honored tradition that keeps families and friends strong in their relationships. That's all for now, Rev. David A. Reedy...
• United States
1 May 09
I attended my first Earth Day celebration back in the eighties. I am very pleased that the rest of the world is catching up. Using resources more wisely is very important to our survival as a planet. I have 7 acres in Tennessee with a greenhouse, where I am growing organic vegetables. I would like to build an Earthship (earthship.org) to live in. I have been recylcling for a long time.