Is Northern Ireland in danger of losing it's identity?.

@Colmuc (708)
May 8, 2009 2:33am CST
I, as a Scotsman, have been complaining about Mylot using the Union Jack to identify discussions about England. It has surprised me that no one from Northern Ireland has so far shown any interest. So far as I can see, the Union Jack is the only official flag Northern Ireland has. It is represented in that flag by the cross of St Patrick. I do not want to raise any political issues but would be very interested in hearing what Northern Irish people think about the Union Jack being used to represent England as if Scotland and Northern Ireland no longer exist. Do any USA residents with Northern Ireland ancestry have any feelings on this?. England's flag is the St. Georges Cross and that should be used whenever only England is being referred to.
1 person likes this
2 responses
@catdla1 (6005)
• United States
8 May 09
I'm dating myself here, but when I was in school, Northern Ireland had a flag other than the Union Jack. What I remember is posted at this site (reference only): http://www.flags.net/NOIR.htm For whatever reason, I guess it was discontinued in 1973. I can't understand why Northern Ireland uses the Union Jack flag as their own, as it's the flag of the United Kingdom too. Why wouldn't they want something unique to them? I think that England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland and Northern Ireland all should have their own flag, and that flag should be recognized as such. Here in the United State, we have the US Flag, but each state within the union also has a state flag that is unique and recognized. At official locations, both flags are flown together.
@Colmuc (708)
8 May 09
Thank you, catdla, for an interesting response. Scotland has the St Andrew's Cross and also the Lion Rampant. Both are used extensively. I do not understand why the old Irish Flag is no longer accepted except by the Unionists. There must be some story behind it.
@Lakota12 (42681)
• United States
8 May 09
ya know what I dont know if there are any here from Ireland at all.