What is your greatest achievement as an aspie?

Philippines
June 13, 2009 10:55pm CST
There are other people like me who diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome even though that there are some people have doubt them from the start, these aspies won't give up until they become successful in life. As for me, my biggest achievement is that i've already survived three years of my college life (i have to endure this nasty racket which my classmates have made during classes at this period of time) and as an incoming 4th year student for this school year, i'll do my very best and give all what i've got for in order to graduate on time. How about you? What is your greatest achievement as an aspie?
3 responses
@StarBright (2799)
• United States
14 Jun 09
Good for you! Hang in there. My grandson is 7 and has Asperger's. It is encouraging to see your post. I see that need to succeed in him. However, when learning, he gets frustrated when he can't be the best right away and you have to really work with him to get him past that point. He is learning to play chess right now. He is good, but again, he wants to do everything in a hurry.
• Philippines
14 Jun 09
Your welcome Starbright! Now as for your grandson, you have to teach him how to be patient and to accept mistakes because success don't actually sprout overnight, he needs to develop the will to succeed for in order to hurdle a lot of challenges, you have to observed his interest which becomes the catalyst for the road to success, professional help, and not to mention the support from family and friends. I hope that he becomes successful in the future! Just take note that your grandson's impatience just to get things done, he's just like me as well.
• United States
14 Jun 09
Thank you so much for that. We are working with him. Or is he working with us? (LOL) He is a real delight. We feel fortunate that we discovered the Asperger's early.
1 person likes this
• Philippines
14 Jun 09
I'm glad that i can able to help you.
@ALouie (118)
• United States
19 Jun 09
My greatest achievement has been to be a successful homemaker. Additionally, just having discovered and researched aspergers I am able to just now, after 42 years, begin to study and navigate myself through social situations. Even though I don't fully understand the nuances, I can now study and act through most social situations successfully. The other really big accomplishment is learning words to a song. I have never been able to learn a song's words, to mouth, hum, or sing along, and for the first time I am 3/4 through learning the words to James Blunt's song "You are the brightest star". I write one phrase a day on a square piece of paper. It requires a lot of patience but it can be done. Keep at it. It is worth the hard work. I made it through college and I did not even know what aspergers was. Your awareness of aspergers is a huge accomplishment in itself. Knowing what you are dealing with gives you a great advantage. I learned 0 song lyrics in 42 years and 3/4 of a song in just 12 days.
• Philippines
20 Jun 09
Well you've also accomplished way ahead of me by becoming a homemaker at your own will while as for me that i'm in my final year which i'm been working really hard to graduate on time (i hope and pray at the same time). And besides that it's never too late to discover our conditions and how to deal with throughout our lives for the better. Right now that i'm helping my professor in Literature of creating a new university-wide organization that is exclusively for the differently-abled students of my university since the number of students with impairments enroll here are growing. Thank you for sharing your thoughts!
@ALouie (118)
• United States
20 Jun 09
The program you are working on is truly an inspiration. I always look for and wish for programs like that to be more available. Please keep mylot posted on the work for this program and lots of luck to you working towards graduation. What type of assistance is the college program you are working on going to provide? I have been toying with the idea of putting together a guide for neurologically atypical people, such as aspies or adhd, but I don't know where or how to start. I have always been seeking comfortable environments due to my "sensitivities" and I thought it would be helpful to have a guide for people to consult when looking for anything from a school, a town, a restaurant, etc...Your college sounds like it may be one to go in such a guide, for instance. Another example, I always get very stressed waiting in lines, and I found one deli that always has a very neat and orderly line. They also have several counter persons, and one person takes one entire order for each customer, from start to finish. It is very clear where the line begins and ends, and the way it is set up it is very unlikely that someone will cut the line. Also, so far, no one has tried to cut the line and generally everyone waits their turn. I would also put this deli in the guide. Sort of something to help make the quality of our lives a little bit better. Cheers.
@ponkers (20)
• Poland
24 Mar 10
The doctors failed to diagnose my disfunction as Asperger's for most of my life, although for real I've been struggling with the syndrome ever since I was a little kid. I think my biggest achievement is actually finding out what is up with me. I mean, I used to, and still do, feel inferior because of my unusual behaviors. I failed on my relationships, I almost failed in high school and right i struggle with graduating from college. But I don't give up. It's easy to give up. I suppose that if it wasn't for a lot of people who actually do a lot to raise awareness for the syndrome, I would've never thought it even exists. When I was 6 my parents decided to send me to school a year earlier but psychologist wouldn't let me. If it had not been for their fight I would've had just repeated preschool year one more time. Just because I was not sociable and really shy. And because I COULD read. I remember being a child I was so filled with love for the world and wanted to talk to everybody but I had no idea how to start, what to say and all my attempts turned out to be catastrophies. I suppose that the fact that I carry on with what I'm doing and never gave up school is an achievement. Also I think that whenever i got kicked by some people who had no faith in me I thought - "I'll make progress later, you'll see". It is really painful to hear from 'normal' people (what does that mean, anyway?) that having education or even job is a miracle when you're Aspergian or autistic. It is, but not because we are less gifted than they are. Most frequently autistic people are genius but the problems with communication blocks them from presenting what mean. I would like to thank John Elder Robison for his book that helped me begin to accept my dysfunction and also, helped me begin to understand the state that me and my life are in right now. And for letting me know that i'm not the only child who had been said "look me in the eye, kid".