The power of the word.

@eileenleyva (13767)
Philippines
July 12, 2009 7:08pm CST
I am so disappointed with myself. I made a typographical error on the title of a discussion and I didn't notice it until it was already too late to edit. A mentor once told me that when one writes, one must never show it to anyone until he is sure that what he had written had been correct and true. The power of the word produces deep impact, so one must always be careful.
4 responses
• United States
13 Jul 09
Typographical mistakes tend to be the most forgivable ones a person can make. It is a far better thing to show someone an imperfectly written work and receive constructive criticism than to pour over every word, check for every mistake, and have nothing from which to learn.
1 person likes this
• United States
13 Jul 09
After many years of working with the written word both in offices, as a medical transcriptionist, and now as a writer, I have found that it is important to have someone else go over your work because mistakes are easy to miss. You tend to read over mistakes and not see them when writing because the work becomes too familiar to your eye. As for making a mistake, it happens to everyone, I forgive myself and go on hoping that the main idea was not lost in the error.
@eileenleyva (13767)
• Philippines
13 Jul 09
The same mentor told me that once you've written something, leave it for a while and do something relaxing. Come back to it after sometime and you'll see it entirely from a new perspective. But I guess that is not possible with the internet. We publish immediately, errors and all.
@cbjones (1156)
• United States
13 Jul 09
I've only made one topic on MyLot thus far. Didn't notice my mistake until it was too late. I misspelled the word chocolate as chotolate.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (13767)
• Philippines
13 Jul 09
Mine was emty for empty. Guess it just happens, even to the best of us.
• United States
13 Jul 09
Ah yes, there is deep power in words. However, mistakes happen, the best people are still going to have a typo here and there they don't catch. Whatever Douglas Adams might think, it is highly improbable that misspeaking or mistyping once will cause a massive war because someone thought you insulted their mother. It may, however, cause a giggle or two.
1 person likes this
@eileenleyva (13767)
• Philippines
13 Jul 09
Thanks for telling me about the lighter side of committing errors. For the longest time it had been like a mortal sin for me. The printed word, especially the message it entails, is difficult to erase. Once it had been written and read, it is there forever.