An achoholic in the UK..

United States
July 20, 2009 6:53pm CST
I can't post links here but I saw on the drudge report that a 22 year old from the UK was refused a liver transplant cause the system didn't think he would be able to stay sober... You guessed it of what health care they have!! Now I know the guy was a drunk and as goes with smokers they never truly quit until they are diagnosed with cancer or something. What gives the government the right to tell him they think he won't quit and therefore he has to die?? The man was 22, everyone thinks they're invinsible at that age.
1 person likes this
3 responses
@nicholejade (2430)
• Canada
21 Jul 09
This may come off a little harsh but I do agree that why should he get a liver transplant when he damaged it by drinking in the first place. I am sure most of us know that drinking causes liver damage over time. However I do feel for this guy because he is so young. But the government can't bend over backwards for this guy as there are many others that need a liver and they never drank in their life. I know here in Canada we have a huge guideline and stipulations that they have to follow as well. But I am saddened because he is such a young guy.
@Rollo1 (16699)
• Boston, Massachusetts
21 Jul 09
I did see this and it is very sad. Of course, even here in the US he might not have gotten a liver in time, because even if approved there could be a long wait. I saw a case not too long ago that pointed out the insanity of NHS rules as regards who is and is not eligible for care. A fellow had broken an ankle, and even though it had been set, it had not healed properly because they only casted it, when it really required surgery to insert pins. He is unable to work because of this ankle that healed improperly, but he is unable to get the surgery on his ankle because he smokes. That's right. According to the NHS, certain services and surgery can be denied to people who smoke or who are overweight. They are punishing people basically for personal habits they dislike. Now, smoking has very little to do with a broken ankle, but no matter. Rules are rules. So this guy can't work and can't have surgery unless he stops smoking. In the meantime, he is collecting benefits due to his disability and they can't stop paying him unless they make him well which they won't do because he smokes which he doesn't really need to stop doing because he's still getting paid for not working. Welcome to the wonderful world of nationalized health care.
23 Jul 09
Thing is though, smoking is related because 'it has a very big influence on the outcome of this type of surgery and the healing process would be hindered significantly' according to the hospital that are refusing to operate on Mr Nuttall. I am not a doctor but I'm willing to believe that this is a good enough reason not to operate. However, this case does highlight how two government departments - the Department of Health and the Department for Work and Pensions - don't always work together.
1 person likes this
@Rollo1 (16699)
• Boston, Massachusetts
23 Jul 09
Well, I completely understand non-smokers feeling this way but I am a smoker and I have had several surgeries, even having been told once that I healed surprisingly quickly for that type of incision. So, I frankly don't believe that smoking is a good enough reason not to surgically reset a broken ankle. In fact, it's a fact that nicotine blocks pain receptors in the brain and the CDC issued a report indicating that smoking patients should be given special consideration in pain management due to the fact that they will be denied this pain-blocking substance following surgery. Hey, maybe he would quit during his hospital stay. The real reason is the nanny state punishing those who don't do as they say. The taxes on smokes is high to make it financially difficult for people to smoke. Yet motorcycle fatalities are much higher than those for people in cars but taxes on motorcycles are not higher than those on other vehicles. One day, they may be. They just haven't gotten around to it yet.
@xfahctor (14126)
• Lancaster, New Hampshire
21 Jul 09
Actually many hospitals here also prioritize transplants the same way. They go through the list of recipiants and choose the best candidates for the transplant.