How is law enforcement in your state?

United States
September 19, 2009 4:22pm CST
I grew up as a child in a society where my grandparents and parents were revered members of their various communities. My grandparents and parents were always considerate, tolerant and at the service of people. My parents never looked down at people or thought we were above the law or anyone. So naturally I grew up with the belief that government is servant of the people. I actually expect any government official I run into to greet me and ask how they may assist me! I know. I know. I returned to the US as a youth and have never understood why government officials are so rude and seem to be of the persuasion that they are master to the people! Each time I have an encounter with a government official, especially law enforcement, there is a clash – not because I despise government, but because I do not like their method of approach! Today in Houston, Texas, various branches of law enforcement are having displays of their gadgets at the parking lot of Greenspoint Mall. I walked up to HPD (and later FBI) and told them I was surprised they were acting friendly to the people. “We are friendly,” two replied. “But your record says otherwise. A good number of the killings, miamings and beatings in the past few years started from very minor incidents,” I said. “We have to enforce the law!” said HPD. “And I have no problem with law enforcement. But when you start beating, jailing and killing people simply because they question your actions, then we have a serious problem!” “They just have to do as told,” replied HPD. “And that is where we differ. Do you know that the common denominator all the people who usually clash with law enforcement have is the ability to think and know when that fine-line between policing and harassment has been crossed? You see, officer, people have the right to question you. You are servant to the people!” “No! I am not servant to the people! I am protector!” said HPD. “Yuh? You, officer, are servant to the people! All government officials, from trash collector to President, are servant to the people.” “No! I think that is where you get it wrong," said HPD officer. “I am not a servant. I protect!” “(Laughs) Officer, I see where you get your brutally from. You do not understand your relationship to the people; which is why there will always be conflict between y’all and the people.” Time: About 2:15PM Central. How is law enforcement in your State? It is very bad down here in Texas.
3 responses
@irishidid (8712)
• United States
19 Sep 09
I haven't had much experience with the police in my state except when my ex kept stealing my car. The city I live in presently has a large number of policemen who are Croatian and that's only because we have a large population of Croatian people. The same goes for the fire department. Sure, we have our smart a** ones but so does everywhere else. Most of the ones I've come across were pretty nice.
• United States
21 Sep 09
I am glad to know that yours are pretty nice. Here in Texas, they approach people with the assumption that people are already guilty, become non-logical when one tries to reason and will kill you for no reason and get away with it. They just do not like anyone, regardless of race, who has commonsense. They have this "teach them a lesson, if they give you a hard time" policy - and often the "hard time" is simply the ability to think and reason! In Texas we have no protection under State law against government officials.
• United States
1 Oct 09
Irishidid, make sure you remain in your State! Here in Texas officers assume they can do as they please and you are supposed to kiss their behinds! Law enforcement officers over here will issue citations, take people to jail, taser, beat and/or kill people for almost nothing! Would you believe that most of them here in Texas are offended when one is not bothered by their presence?
@spalladino (17921)
• United States
19 Sep 09
The law enforcement personnel in my state of Florida are, for the most part, dedicated and reasonable...but I think you're a little bit confused when it comes to their role in our society, especially when compared with those who work for other government agencies. While law enforcement personnal are, in fact, public servants they are also figures of authority...they have to be in order to be able to protect and serve. When an officer issues a command, whether it's to pull your vehicle over or to stop if you are walking, you are obligated as a citizen to follow his/her commands. Our officers and deputies regularly put their lives on the line and, for everyone's protection, they must have the ability to control any situation they become party to. In order to do this there must be cooperation from the public. Our deputies will speak nicely but they will also do whatever is necessary to ensure their safety and the safety of others. You mention in your discussion killings, maimings and beatings. You neglect to mention what followed these events. Were the officers involved charged or did the "victims" bring these events upon themselves by refusing to follow directions and/or becoming combative? Law enforcement officers are not in the same category as other government workers because they have to deal with criminals and willingly enter into situations with both known and unknown dangers.
• United States
21 Sep 09
Spalladino, I understand the danger involved in policing. I understand that law officers sometimes do not know what is ahead of them. But when they go about with this assumption that people are not suppose to talk back or question them, then we, my dear, have a problem! Most of the beatings, jailings and killings in Texas all resulted from mere minor traffic violations and alleged traffic violations. Our Texas officers will kill people and children already subdued on the ground simply because these people questioned or reasoned with them (and all these stem from their policy of "teach them, if they give you a hard time!) And by the way, did you know that law enforcement officials take daily shots of adrenaline?
@bestboy19 (5480)
• United States
19 Sep 09
"How is law enforcement in your state?" I try my best not to find out.