Anyone fancy a raw olive?

@thea09 (18316)
Greece
October 13, 2009 9:23am CST
Some may like them, some detest them, there seems to be no middle ground with olives. There are two kinds, olives for oil and olives for eating, but did you know that an eating olive directly from the tree is inedible? It takes 40 days of soaking in salt water to produce an edible product. I often ponder who actually discovered this, surely if someone just took one from a tree to eat it would be thrown away in utter disgust. So what do you eat that you have to mess about with to make it edible, what can you think of which has to be prepared like an olive?
9 people like this
21 responses
@SomeCowgirl (32255)
• United States
13 Oct 09
I was not aware that it took 40 days for an olive to be ready to eat. I like olives on my salad, I kind of forgot that until this discussion here. Most recently I've had them on my sub. I think I'm the only fan of olives really, lol.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
13 Oct 09
Hi Amber, 40 days of messing about with the little things could go some way to explaining the price, though I'm sure they've found a quicker method of doing them en masse. Okay I've got to ask and sorry if it's a typo but what is a 'sub'. I take it you mean the only olive fan between Mr and Mrs, I should think there's rather more than another several million of us out there.
1 person likes this
@SomeCowgirl (32255)
• United States
13 Oct 09
A sub is a sandwich between to pieces of bread either six inches or a foot long. Oh, and by the only "fans" I meant between the people of the house which is myself, my husband and his parents... unless you count our dogs and two cats, but don't know that they'd eat an olive either, lol.
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
13 Oct 09
So a sub is a sandwich on French bread. Is it a real word? I've truly never heard of it before. Can you have a toasted sub?
1 person likes this
@dawnald (84069)
• Shingle Springs, California
13 Oct 09
I did know that about olives. I love them, all kinds! But something else that takes that much preparation? Nope, no idear atall atall...
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@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
13 Oct 09
Well luckily I don't have to do any of the work there, I get given the things. My trees only produce oil. Amazingly the avatar managed to produce the best olives I've ever tasted.
1 person likes this
@dawnald (84069)
• Shingle Springs, California
13 Oct 09
One of my neighbors in my old neighborhood use to pluck the olives from the neighbor's tree (with permission) and soak them. He told me all about it one day...
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
13 Oct 09
I really can't imagine olive trees in the US. They must be babies. Actually someone gifted my son an olive tree which is 800 years old but it's not on my land so I just leave it sitting there and let him pick it still.
1 person likes this
@ANTIQUELADY (36468)
• United States
14 Oct 09
I don't know of anything that i eat that takes that long but of course i didn't know it took olives that long either. That is very interesting. u JUST TAKE THINGS FOR GRANTED NEVER KNOWING HOW THEY GET IN A JAR OR A CAN.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Hi Aunty, I think the mass produced jars of olives go through a speedier process these days but the locals still prepare them for their own use in the traditional way, the avatar actually gave me a jar of the best ones I've tasted so far, but he left them in a net soaking in the sea to start with. I think that once the 40 day rule was discovered it was then applied to other foodstuffs they weren't sure how to make edible and I believe that packing anchovies in salt was another one.
1 person likes this
@ANTIQUELADY (36468)
• United States
14 Oct 09
This is all very interesting to me. I like learning new things. I want ever eat another olive w/out thinking about this. thanks.
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
I'm glad you enjoyed it Aunty. I don't have any eating olive trees, just ones for oil and the harvest of those starts first, so I'll post a discussion when it comes to olive picking time. The eating ones will be left until the New Year and I may take some as they are and have a go, but I'm afraid they'll all go mouldy if I try it myself.
1 person likes this
@Sandra1952 (6052)
• Spain
14 Oct 09
Hello, Thea. We have an olive tree in our garden, but so far we've had no olives on it. Our neighbour's tree is a couple of years older than ours, and last week she harvested two buckets of olives, which she spend hours pricking ready to soak in salt. We can buy a big can of olives from LIDL down the road for about 50 cents, so I asked her why she was bothering, but she wanted some olives from her own tree. I'll probably be the same when my own olives materialise. I love langoustines, and we can buy them on the markets very reasonably. They're easy enough to cook, but they're so messy to peel that I usually just by frozen, partially cooked king prawns. A couple of minutes in the pan with olive oil, garlic and chilli flakes and they're ready to eat, and no messy fingers. My husband loves ox tongue, and I usually cook one for Christmas for him. That has to be soaked, then boiled, then peeled, then pressed in a basin with savoury jelly, so it's quite a palaver, but he loves it, bless him, and it's only a once a year job. The rest of the year I just buy it on the deli counter. Only in England, though, as the Spanish prepare their tongue differently and it's not so flavourful. Tongue is one of the very few items that England can do better than Spain.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Hello Sandra, I would have read this later when my meal had digested if I'd realised you were going to digress onto tongue. It takes seven years before your tree will produce olives and they may end up being the oil kind. I wonder if your neighbour is trying to make oil olives into eating olives. I don't have any eating olive trees but 10 olive oil trees, some of them are huge and have been there for I don't know how long. A friend of mine pruned them back so much two winters ago that the only thing left of them was trunks which he assured me would mean more crop but having just been down and checked them tonight I don't think they'll make up more than an 18 kilo can, but it really is worth doing them to have my own oil. Or rather find a volunteer to come and do them, it's wonky work up those three legged wooden ladders. I may pick the lower ones myslef by hand, I'll only need to borrow an olive sack to do that. Is it hot there by the way Sandra? I'm actually cold indoors and it's way too early to pay for heating.
1 person likes this
• Spain
14 Oct 09
We've been told ours are eating olives, and my neighbour's olives certainly look just like the olives they're selling in the markets. Sorry if I put you off your meal, but it just seemed a natural progression to me. It's very hot here - after the floods at the end of September, we've had an October heatwave, and it's still getting up to 30 degrees in the daytime and not dropping much below 22 degrees overnight.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Here its been cold mornings and heating up after about 2 to needing the fan on at night. This is the first night without the fan and with socks on, so a bit early. The tourists are still on the beaches though, even when it's black clouds and rainI just want the weather we should have had in September to arrive, best month of the year and all we had were clouds and humidity. Looks like you timed your visit away well.
@malpoa (1218)
• India
14 Oct 09
I almost knew this or I should say I guessed this. Coz not a single show has been aired on travel and living where they show raw olive being eaten!! I have this faint memory of someone saying that it is disgusting to eat raw olives. We get the salted ones here in bottles and I have wondered what it tastes like when raw...But oil is extracted from raw ones right without keeping it in saline water? We have this dish prepared from mangoes which are kept in saline water for more than 3 weeks. It tastes good and diffrent. The mangoes are peeles and mashed to make a curry with yogurt. It is prefect for a hot summer day.
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Hi malpoa, you were right. Oil is extracted from a different type of olive to the ones we eat, I can see the difference when they are on the trees. Locally the eating ones grow bigger and blacker than the oil ones, which are small and green with some turning purplish at harvest time. My olives are only suitable for oil but some others have both kinds of trees growing side by side, but generally it is the oil ones which grow in more abundance. You can't tell the difference by looking at a tree, only by looking at the fruit as it matures. I've never tried salted mangoes Malpoa, but have often had a sweet mango chutney with curry. Do you need to change the salt water daily as with the olives, or just leave the mangoes to sit in it for 3 weeks?
@malpoa (1218)
• India
15 Oct 09
AS for this purpose, we use both raw mangoes and the small mangoes waiting to grow bigger and ripe on day hi hi. THe smaller ones tastes better when put in salt water and we make pickles also with htis. No, we do not change water. Actually it ismore of salt and less water, say for five or six kilos of mango, we put a little less than one cup of water. A sort of preserving mangoes...Now i miss all those dishes...I cant recollect the time I had it for the last time...:(
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
15 Oct 09
Time to get drying then Malpoa, sounds like an easy enough task for the brother in law to help with
@zed_k4 (17624)
• Singapore
13 Oct 09
Thea.. I've never had any raw olive before. Not that I can think of anyway. But I do love olive oil. So healthy for one's health, as you already know. Here, olive oil can be so expensive, around 12 bucks per bottle.
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@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Hi zed, well there are two kinds of olives, one which produces the wonderful oil and those are the kind of trees I have, then the ones which produce olives to eat. But either type if plucked from a tree and attempted to be eaten taste beyond foul, bitter, nasty and foul. After processing though the eating variety are delcious and can just be eaten alone with a glass of something. If you see them in the shops you should try a small jar, they will be much less expensive than the olive oil. They are an acquired taste though and some people hate them whilst it is compulsory to love them in Greece. If you like them though you won't be able to stop,though I do prefer them in hot weather. They are about the hottest food item in Greece (hot as in chilli but not nearly as hot as).
1 person likes this
@zed_k4 (17624)
• Singapore
14 Oct 09
WoW... awesome. Thanks for explaining in detailsto me, Thea. So there are 2 types. I dislike bitter taste, so I shall pass that, haa...
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
15 Oct 09
Bitter is an improvement on bland.
@Hatley (164229)
• Garden Grove, California
13 Oct 09
hi thea the only thing that this early in the morning that I can think of that needs a lot of things done to it is hominy,which is corn that has been treated someway with lye water,yep sodium hydroxide, and the stuff really does' taste good, but whenever I eat it I have to make myself forget this hominy was made with lye water other wise I am apt to wonder if hominy is going to corrode my insides.lol. also there is sauerkraut that my mother used to make,you essentially make the beginnings of coleslaw but leave off the dressing and let the shredded cabbage set in a warm 'room until it sort of ferments and turns into sauerkraut. I love the stuff if it is homemade, the canned sauerkraut is messed up with too much vinegar so all you taste is cheap vinegar that puckers up your mouth and doesnt give you that crisp sauerkraut taste. I often wonder who invented the processes that take good food and turn it into something else, either good or bad. I did know about olives, that they have to be soaked in salt water for a long time. I love both black and green olives.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
13 Oct 09
Hi Hatley, you've completely lost me as I'd no idea what hominy is or lye water. So is this just raw corn from the cob mixed with sodium hydroxide, I thought that was the stuff which made teeth go white. How do you eat it? Is it part of a meal, a dip, what, I'm clueless? I can't recall if I've ever had sauerkraut but the description of fermented cabbage sounds odd too. Do you add vinegar to it, you didn't say, and what kind if you do? I think I'll probably just stick with homemade coleslaw on that one.
14 Oct 09
Pickled cabbage is a northern European thing. Cabbage is a good scource of vitamin C, and pickling is the only way of preserving cabbage and other vegetables through the winter. In the days before modern food production, these pickled vegetables provided the only scource of vitamin C during the winter. Pickled herring is also a northern European and and Scandinavian thing and the Swedes also produce a fermented herring product that must be rather like the Roman Garum which was a fermented fish sauce that was very popular to judge by the number of Garum amphorae that have been discovered.
@PeacefulWmn9 (10424)
• United States
15 Oct 09
Now let me think...I do love olives, by the way...green with pimentoes or the dark olives, too. And I cook now always with extra virgin olive oil for it's taste and health properties. I hate raw fish, so I don't eat sushi...but cooked and season a fish first. I eat no raw meat, or rare meat. It must all be well done! That's the first thing that comes to mind, lol. Perhaps I'll be back if I think of something else.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
15 Oct 09
Hi Karen, I don't think anyone really sat around mulling for days if a nice fish was edible, they probably just got on with it, same with a roving animal I should think, once fire had been discovered. Glad to hear you are an olive fan, I shall recommend our local ones to you as they are the best in the world 'Kalamata olives', black ones.
• United States
14 Oct 09
I love olives of all kinds and always have. I used to eat green olives like popcorn. I also love raw oysters with hot sauce. Yum yum! I really love most foods that are pickled :)
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Hi jodylee, glad to hear you are another olive fan though generally they aren't picled but packed in olive oil. I do have some pickled ones which are really good though and also some stuffed with sour lemon. I would love to eat oysters.
@happy6162 (3009)
• United States
14 Oct 09
I did not know that it took 40 days for an olive to be edible. I love the black olives but the green olives are just to salty for my taste. If I start eating black olives I can hardly stop eating them I almost eat a whole can of them.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Hi happy, that is indeed the way with olives, no middle ground, they are either hated and spurned or totally addictive. Don't rule out green olives though as there are so many varieties which differ in flavour and the salt comes from the salting process, not from the actual olives, so maybe its just a particualar regions olives you haven't liked. As a general rule though the smaller green olives are best added whilst cooking and the black ones for eating. Our local ones, Kalamata black olives, are reputedly the best in the world. Like you, once I start I can't stop, unless there's a soggy one in there and then it puts me off.
• United States
13 Oct 09
I love olives! I eat it with everything...salads, pasta, sandwiches, pizza...I sometimes even it it by the spoon full! I have tried an olive directly from a tree; I knew that it has to be processed first to make it edible but my curiosity got the best of me. And let me tell you, it was indeed disgusting! I couldn't spit it out fast enough and the foul taste lasted in my mouth for nearly an hour. I also love to cook with olive oil, since it is a lot healthier and has more nutrients than regular canola or corn oil.
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Hi Winddancer, a true olive fan even tempted by one in the raw state. You are the first here to confirm how truly awful a raw olive can be. Here in Greece the most common way to eat black olives to have a small dish on the table, sat in a little olive oil, and just eaten. They are also added to Greek salads. One thing you may not have tried which I'd highly recommend for an olive fan such as yourself is a jar of 'pasta'. That is the Greek word for it and it is a paste made from olives which is an excellent dip, or spread. It may be labelled as 'tapendas' or simply olive paste. It is wonderful pungent stuff and lasts for ages once opened.
@jellymonty (2354)
13 Oct 09
I realise that you're still upset with me for not including you in my will, but please don't punish me with an olive... I beg you spare my life and I'm totally at your service I'm highly allergic to anything with olives so you won't catch me anywhere near an olive..
1 person likes this
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Oh Jellymonty, I did not realise that you suffered from an olive allergy. Whilst I turned a blind eye to your stealing of my wonderful cooking I have to tell you now, whllst presumably on your hospital bed, that there were olives cut up and added to eveything you stole. Please don't hate me for inadvertantly poisioning you but I'm sending a jar of olives over right now as a get well present.
@jwfarrimond (4474)
14 Oct 09
The only thing that I can think of is potato which is quite inedible in the raw state.
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Hi jwfarrimond, that really doesn't qualify here at all, it doesn't take 40 days or any days at all really to turn a raw potato into an edible state.
14 Oct 09
True.... But I'd hardly think that it was worth the trouble to spend 40 days soaking something that'll just end up as a salad garnish or stuck on a stick in a fancy drink.
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
It's a shame you can't see the wider picture beyond an olive on a cocktail stick. Think back to Greece in the past, to a mainly barren area where little grew beyond olives and wild weeds, to the long months when the sea was too rough to fish and the daily diet was a spartan fare of bread, chesse and olives. The oil was not just used for fancy cooking, it was used as light, soap, made bitter field wilds palatable, as a medicine, many other things. As the health properties of both oil and olives became known the exportation of these things became the essential export the people needed to bring themselves into the modern world.
@Iriene88 (5346)
• Malaysia
13 Oct 09
Dear Thea, Have not tried the raw olives. Previously I do not know how to appreciate olives till one day when I went to Egypt, Israel, Jordan and Bahrain where they served superb olives with salad. The green and dark colour ones was great indeed! Now, olives is my favourite! I guess there are many fruits that I would not know their names in English, were pickled so that it is edible.... In Bahasa Malaysia, we have this fruit call 'kedondong'. Thanks and happy myLotting!
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
13 Oct 09
Hi Iriene, yes you wouldn't want to taste a raw olive, they are completely foul and inedible. That is what always makes me wonder how someone invented the process of actually making them edible and to know how many days it took to get it right. I'm glad to hear you've discovered olives and like them, our local type are black and just served on their own in oil, or with salad. I've never heard of your fruit I'm afraid and never tried a pickled fruit.
1 person likes this
@Iriene88 (5346)
• Malaysia
13 Oct 09
Dear Thea, The process of putting olives in water with salt for 40 days is called pickling. So, we will called it pickled olives. In Asia, we pickle mangoes, nutmeg (with sugar)and many more. In Korea, they pickled those cabbage and called it 'kimchi'. We also put duck eggs in salt water for 21 days or more depends on individual preference on it saltiness. We then call this egg 'salted egg', great to eat with porridge. There are eggs that been wrapped in soil and with some 'chemical' and it turns black, which we called it 'century' egg. Thanks for a great topic :)
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@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
13 Oct 09
Hi Iriene, we'll have to differ on that one, pickling is done when something is preserverd in vinegar, such as pickled onions. Most olives aren't pickled but the avatar did give me a huge jar of wonderful olives which he had added vinegar to so they were pickled olives, but generally olives aren't pickled. The egg wrapped in soil and a chemical sounds perfectly delightfuland the poster below is talking about the Korean kimchi saying something extra is added to make it hot.
1 person likes this
@stvasile (7316)
• Romania
11 Dec 09
I was thinking about this some time ago (I'm not sure if I even mentioned it in a discussion) - how I've never seen a fresh, raw olive in my entire life, and how you can only find olives in that black salty juice... I was really puzzled on how they manage to import many sorts of exotic fruit, bringing them from half around the Globe, but they can't bring fresh olives from Greece or Turkey, which are a few hundred kilometers away.
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
12 Dec 09
Hi stvasile, I don't think olives are exported anywhere in their raw form, the people who produce them will sell them onto be processed. I have seen them raw on the market which is really strange as can't imagine many here would buy them as they would either do their own, get them from others or buy them loose but done in the supermarket. There would be no profit at all in selling raw olives on as until they are processed they are worth nothing and turn mouldy very quickly. I would suspect that's the reason you've never encountered a raw one. But imagine if they were sold raw there and people didn't know what to do with them they would waste their money buying this totally inedible fruit.
1 person likes this
@stvasile (7316)
• Romania
12 Dec 09
That makes total sense, but when I was wondering why I don't see any raw olives around I had no idea raw olives are not edible.
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
12 Dec 09
Then I'm most glad to have been of service imparting that fascinating fact.
1 person likes this
@Shahrus (68)
• Philippines
14 Oct 09
I love olives! As to other foods that need to be processed before being edible (to humans), 5 come to mind: 1) sabah: a kind of super starcy banana that can be eaten in any variety of ways, as either a fruit or a vegetable. The only way sabah can NOT be eaten, however, is raw. 2) soybeans: since these are high in trypsin inhibitors in their natural state, not only do they taste awful when raw, they can also be harmful. Tofu is traditionally made by soaking soy beans in salt water, but I don't think they need to be soaked very long. 3) nathak: is a kind of harder, starchier version of tofu made from trees (don't know which). The bark from a tree trunk is peeled off, then the remaining log is ground down to a pulpy paste. The resulting goo is filtered, so the fibers are removed. Let it set for a few hours (or was it days? I forgot), and voila! Nathak. 4) sago: don't know if this is a fruit or a vegetable, but it is used as both here in the Philippines. Like soy beans, this can be eaten in any number of ways, except raw. I understand it has to be boiled in salt for a bit. 5) edible camphor: which comes from the camphor laurel. I understand oil from this tree is processed the same way as turpentine, but by adding some other equally poisonous substances to it, the combination creates something edible. How ancient people figured the right combination of deadly chemicals to make something edible, is beyond me. They were probably trying to find a more lethal poison, and came up with it by accident: "Raj, you idiot! He's still alive!?" "I don't understand it! I put enough poison in that damn turpentine mix to kill 3 elephants!"
14 Oct 09
Sago is the pith of the Sago palm. Offhand, I don't know how it is prepared though I think soaking in water comes into it.
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
An olive fan Please don't taunt me with tofu, I adore it and can't get it in Greece. I even checked the Greek word for soy beans so I could try and locate them and attempt to make my own, amazingly it was 'soy' with the Greek word for beans on the end. Still not found any though. You've hit on the bit that intrigues me though, how did they know that they could eat something and not be killed by it. Who sat under an olive tree in the first place munching a totally raw olive and worked it out. I've never heard of edible camphor before, I thought it was goo thing like vicks which is rubbed on ones chest for coughs, why would anyone want to eat that? Maybe the answers will remain all time elusive mysteries.
• Philippines
15 Oct 09
Camphor in its edible form is used as both a medicine, as well as a spice, to add some heat to the food, as well as an intense minty flavor without the bite chili peppers provide. As a medicine taken internally, it helps with asthma and fever, and helps thicken the blood. In India, camphor candy is very popular (it tastes like Vicks mixed with sugar, eeuuw!), and some temples offer it to attendees, after first offering it to the Gods. Maybe some raw olives fell into sea water (not a stretch of the imagination, considering Greece is made up of small islands), and some some starving person came along and thought: "What the heck!? I'm so hungry I'll eat anything!" Plucked up the olive and voila! History was made!
1 person likes this
@sunny68 (1327)
• India
15 Oct 09
i have never tried raw olives so can't say about its taste. here we only get olive oil (i wonder if the taste of the two can be related?). but then you are right. there are many natural things that do not taste good unless they are processed. (including tea, coffee and chocolate). it would be interesting to know how their processing was discovered.
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
12 Dec 09
Hi sunny, well it's definitely my turn to be late this time, but only 2 months. Sorry I never saw your response sat on the end here until it just got revived. That's exactly what I always wonder with an olive, just who discovered that this totall inedible hard bitter fruit would become edible after sitting in salt water and cleaned out every day for forty days. Someone very hungy and patient I would imagine.
@sunny68 (1327)
• India
13 Dec 09
....better late than never.....
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
13 Dec 09
• United States
13 Oct 09
Hi Thea, I never knew that about the olive. I love olives in martinis but have given up the martini but not the olives. The only thing I can think of that took the same type of preparation but not as long as 40 days was something I didn't even make but my dad did. It's called kim chee (Korean). We had it at a Korean restaurant and it was so good, salty and spicy, not a clue to what was in the mixture but my dad seemed to know and he decided to try to make it. He cut up vegetables (mostly cabbage, I think) and other non-descript stuff) and soaked it in a "for dad's knowledge only" solution(I don't think he remembers what he put in it) for about 3 days (edible at this point) to 1 week (very seasoned at this point) and voila, homemade kim chee. It was good, hot going down and coming out (if you know what I mean.)
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
13 Oct 09
Hi limanmachina, the kimchi you describe sounds rather like the suaurekraut which Hatley describes above, which I think is German. That is made from fermented cabbage apparently. I like really hot things so would rather fancy trying this Korean kimchee but really wouldn't know what this missing Dad's only secret solution could be. Possibly salt and chilli. There you go putting something that sounds tasty up and then say the final ingredient is secret. I know someone else who does that and when I ask I just get told it's petrol.
1 person likes this
• United States
14 Oct 09
Hi Thea, my dad will not give up his secret solution, although it may be called petrol since it was quite spicy. He did let on that he used Chinese Chilli peppers and hot oil (from the same type of chilli peppers). Eyes watering hot, gasping for air hot ...and I love it!
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
I'm going to ignore that part about the chillies as there's nothing as remotely hot as that around these parts, and I'd just be jealous. I am going to believe that your Dad's secret recipe is indeed petrol.
@ZephyrSun (7382)
• United States
14 Oct 09
Here we can only get olives in a can. So I imagine that they have some sort of cooking process but, I really don't know. I really don't care for the taste of green olives but, I will eat them if they are in sauces or potatoe salad. I much prefer black olives.
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Hi Zeph, our black olives are the best, we don't produce green eating olives round here, so obviously you show good taste in your olives. I don't think I'd fancy canned olives, they are meant to come packed in olive oil but I think of something a bit nasty when I think of them from a can.
@pcruz77 (452)
• Guam
14 Oct 09
I hear that those things are very disgusting raw, people prefer the ones that are pickled...those are the best...
@thea09 (18316)
• Greece
14 Oct 09
Hi pcruz, you heard right, they are truly disgusting and foul even though they may appear to be ripe. Generally they aren't a pickled thing though quite a few people here have referred to them as such, but they can be. It all depends on what is added to the final jar really and in Greece it is generally olive oil.