What has happened to respect?

United States
November 17, 2009 8:46pm CST
The past two days I have arrived home in the afternoon to find two of the neighbor's boys in the pasture with my horses. Both nights I have told them that they are NOT allowed in the pasture unless I am there with them. My horse is very large 1200 + lbs, and although not mean, could hurt them easily by just stepping on a foot. I have also asked their father to speak to them and tell them that they are not to be here unless I am home too. I truly don't mind the boys coming over when I am here, but I am a worrier by nature and this is unacceptable to me that anyone would think that they can just walk onto my property and take liberties with my livestock at their own whim. Perhaps I need to be a bit sterner with them if they do it again, but I truly hate to be the 'witchy' lady down the road. :(
1 person likes this
3 responses
@eloouuu (176)
18 Nov 09
It is essential that you assert your authority on this situation because if the children come to any harm, regardless of how many times you have previously warned them, you could be responsible for the cost of their health care just in the same way as you would be if you were the cause of a traffic collision or were negligent in any way which could potentially lead to the harm of others. It may be worth explaining to the father the dangerous situation into which his children are putting themselves and that you simply have the welfare of his children in your best interests. Would it be possible for you to arrange a time when the boys could spend time with your horses under your supervision or alternatively for you to install measures which would prevent the boys from gaining access to your pastures when you are not there? It is highly irresponsible of their parents to demonstrate such a blatant disregard for the care of their children and in too many cases like this, people get hurt. You are exercising your responsibility of your livestock by presenting these cautions to your neighbours and again to their children so they are fully aware of the risks and they ought to exercise their responsibility of controlling their children! It clearly not only demonstrates a lack of respect for your wishes but also a lack of common sense and correct moral discipline. Although speaking in a strictly legal sense, what they are doing is essentially trespassing and would never have been forgiven if I had been guilty of the same thing as a child.
• United States
18 Nov 09
Although I do have very good liability insurance, our state law has provisions for equine owners in case of accidents. The code of Alabama states that the owner is not liable for accidents. The boys have been told repeatedly that they can only visit if either I or my husband are at home. I can chain the gates closed, but gaining access to the pasture is as simple as climbing over/under a fence. We have 75 acres, and there is no way that I can afford to change our fencing around the entire property just to keep two wayward boys out. I only tolerate them coming over because I do feel sorry for the boys. They are being raised by their father and elderly grandmother, and have been allowed to go unsupervised for most of their lives. Thank you for your reply.
@TrvlArrngr (4051)
• United States
18 Nov 09
I was just talking about this today with my pastor. Respect is gone from our youth and it is a real shame. They no longer respect their parents, teachers, elders, etc. It makes me sad to see how some of them act. I am actually embarrassed by some of their actions too.
• United States
18 Nov 09
Thanks for your reply! It is truly amazing to me how different the generation of today is from the time when I grew up.
@sid556 (30989)
• United States
24 Nov 09
You don't mention how old these boys are but your concerns are valid. If something were to happen to either one of them while on your property then you would be responsible. You need to be firmer with the parents of these boys. The parents should know where their kids are. They have no business being on your property when you are not home.